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SSioQrapbical IRevicw 



THIS VOLUME CONTAINS BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF 



LEADING CITIZENS OF 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY 



NEW JERSEY 



" Biography is the home aspect of history " 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1896 






h^StJ) 



PREFACE. 



VE take pleasure in presenting to our patrons the completed volume of biogra- 
phies of representative citizens of Cumberland County, New Jersev, feeling- 
confident that this collection of contemporary life sketches and portraits, filling 
a ]olace hitherto unoccupied, will be found to possess sufficient intrinsic merit to 
justify its existence. Its publication in the one hundred and fiftieth year of the 
existence of the County of Cumberland, which in 1747 was separated from Salem 
County and named for the victor of Culloden, may well be regarded as timely, the 
book being in some sort a mark of the progress of a century and a half. Some of the 
family names here registered, it will be noted, go back much farther than that, even 
to the early years of the settlement of Fenwick's Colony ; and others recall the daring 
deeds and heroic sacrifices of the determined men and devoted women of the Revolu- 
tionary period. 

It is interesting to note the transmission of sterling virtues, as industry, love of 
freedom, reverence for law and order, patriotism, from a remote ancestry; and not less 
^ profitable is the tracing of individual effort in the advancement of noble ends. This, 
moreover, is the proper function of biography, to preserve the memory of worthy 
names and useful actions, to the end that, happily, the good men do may live after 
them, may be productive of more and more good. And so 

" Let the great world spin forever down the rhiging grooves of change." 

UlOGKArillCAL RliVIEW PuiU.ISI UNO CoMl'ANY. 
November, iSy6. 



BIOGRArHICAL RKVIKW 



16S4, was a merchant in the city of New 
York. He was subsequently President of the 
Revisionary Council, and from August i, 
1731, till August I, 1732 (the date of the 
arrival of the regular Governor of New York, 
Colonel William Cosby) was Acting Governor 
of the colony, and was known as Governor Yan 
Dam ; anil history states that Governor Van 
Dam was much more popular than Governor 
Cosby. He married Sarah Van der Spiegel, 
and their son Richard had a daughter, Sarah, 
who married James White; and James White's 
daughter Cornelia was the wife of Abram 
Mesierandthe mother of Mrs. Nichols. Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Nichols were the parents of the 
following children: Emily, wife of E. H. 
Goodwin; Robert C, the subject of this 
sketch; John M. ; Henry G. ; I'ercival ; and 
Claudius H. 

Robert C. Nichols received his education 
in the schools of his native place. He went 
to work when about fifteen years of age, enter- 
ing the employ of Mr. William Torrcy, hard- 
ware dealer, with whom he remained until the 
family removed to Philadelphia. I'rom that 
city lie went to Norristown, Pa., where he re- 
sided some ten years. He was there engaged 
in the manufacture of nails and iron, and was 
one of the most successful business men in 
the place. For some time he was associated 
with Messrs. David and Benjamin Reeves; and 
a consolidation was effected with the Cumber- 
land Nail and Iron Works at Bridgeton, which 
rendered necessary the removal of the machin- 
ery to that place. Mr. Nichols as one of the 
partners managed the works, and by his busi- 



ness tact and energy greatly increased their 
capacity and enhanced the reputation of their 
products. In December, 1856, he became 
President of the corporation ; and he held his 
position, discharging the duties of general 
manager, until r.Sji, when he retired fiom 
active participation in the affairs of the com- 
pany, though still retaining an interest as a 
stockholder. A successful business man, Mr. 
Nichols inherited many of the noble character- 
istics of his father, and was widely esteemed. 
He was largely identified with the interests of 
Bridgeton, and was one of the originators of 
the 13ridget()n Building Association, President 
and Director of the Bridgeton Gas Light Com- 
pany, a Director of the Cumberland Mutual 
Insurance Company, and a Director of the 
Cumberland National l^ank. 

June 15, 1837, Mr. Robert C Nichols was 
married to Harriet A., flaughtcr of George H. 
Stanton, of New York. Mrs. Nichols is a de- 
scendant of Henry Stanton, who was a native 
of Liverpool, England, and of Captain Cor- 
nelius Winkoop, an officer in the Revolution- 
ary army. Henry Stanton was married to the 
daughter of Captain Winkoop, April 19, 1786, 
in Trinity Church, New York. Their son, 
George H., the father of Mrs. Nichols, was 
married to her mother, whose maiden name 
was Sophia Avery, September 3, i'8i2. Three 
daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Nichols, 
namely: Julia F. ; Harriet A., deceased, who 
was the wife of Charles H. Boardman, M.D., 
of St. Paul, Minn.; and Emily G., also de- 
ceased, who was the wife of James R. Walsh, 
of the same city. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



In early life Mr. Nichols was a Whig and 
later a Republican, but he was never an active 
worker in the political field. 

He was a communicant of the Episcopal 
church, having been confirmed by the vener- 
able Bishop White. He was for many years 
Senior Warden of St. Andrew's Church, which 
was founded mainly through his instrumental- 
ity, and which holds to-day two memorials to 
his worth. One, a lancet window of richly 
colored glass with appropriate design and in- 
scription, was given by his widow. The 
other, a hexagonal pulpit of burnished brass 
on a platform of ash, was placed there by his 
townspeople si.x years after his death, as a 
tribute of their respect and esteem. 

One who knew Mr. Nichols well writes: 
"There are encountered, not so often as 
might be wished, men whose characters are so 
symmetrical and complete, and upon whose 
lives, both public and private, is marked so 
clearly the impress of the Holy Spirit, that no 
one is at a loss to understand at once, and with- 
out any explanation, that they are the King's 
servants. Such a one was Robert C. Nichols. 
. . . No traits were more marked in Mr. 
Nichols than his humility and transparent 
simplicity. He was pre-eminently 'wise unto 
that which is good and simple concerning 
evils'; and he never transgressed the injunc- 
tion not 'to think of himself more highly than 
he ought to think,' but always regarded him- 
self as of those who were called 'the least of 
these my brethren. ' Cheerfulness and benev- 
olence, hopefulness and charity, gentleness and 
courtesy, all contributed their full share to the 



sum of the graces which adorned him; nor 
would it be easy to say which of these predom- 
inated. They were not the accompaniments 
of a character lacking in force. Mr. Nichols 
was a man of deep and earnest convictions; 
and, whether in business, in politics, or in re- 
ligion, he never failed to display in their as- 
sertion a courage and energy that were born of 
the consciousness that the cause he advocated 
was a righteous cause." 



-r^ HENRY STEVENS, LL.B., LL.M., 
I =1 one of the foremost members of the 
^"i— i^ legal fraternity in Vineland, N.J., 
was born in Providence, R. I., January i8, 
1842, son of Benjamin and Judith (Gifford) 
Stevens. Several generations of his family 
were born in Windham, Me., where his great- 
grandfather. Chase Stevens, was one of the 
pioneers; and previous to the settlement of 
Windham the family was for many years well 
known and prominent in Portland and vicin- 
ity. Nathaniel Stevens, the father of Ben- 
jamin Stevens, was a prominent land-owner of 
Windham; and for his family Stevens Plains 
in Deering, Me., was named. 

Benjamin Stevens, the father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born August 16, 18 16, in 
Windham, Me., and spent his early life there. 
His parents, who were Quakers, sent him to 
the Friends' School at Providence, R.I., to 
finish his education ; and when his studies were 
completed he remained in that city. The in- 
surance business interested him, and he be- 
came eventually one of the leading insurance 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



men of Rhode Island. An expert in all mat- 
ters relating to that business, he published a 
work for the use of agents which was of much 
practical value. For many years he was asso- 
ciated with Henry B. Anthony and other men 
of his stamp. In politics Benjamin Stevens 
was very influential, taking an active part in 
the rulings of the Republican party in the 
days of the Know Nothings; but, though 
urged to accept nomination for office, he in- 
variably refused. He was one of the five 
men known as the Journal office clique, who 
practically controlled the State nominations 
by their influence. He died July 28, 1859. 
His wife, who is now residing in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, is a daughter of Noah Gifford, of Little 
Compton, R.I., and is also of Quaker stock. 
She is the mother of six children, all of whom 
are living. 

N. Henry Stevens was reared in Provi- 
dence, and after a preliminary course of study 
in the public schools entered the Friends' 
School of tiiat city. Later he took the cur- 
riculum of Brown University under private 
tutors, and at the time of the breaking out of 
the Rebellion was studying law with the Hon. 
Charles H. Parkhurst, of Providence. An- 
swering the first call of the President for three 
years' men, he went to Massachusetts to enlist 
as a private, as his enlistment in Rhode 
Island would have been favored with a com- 
mission; and in August, 1861, lie was en- 
rolled at New Bedford in Company D, Twenty- 
third Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer 
Infantry. The regiment went first to Annap- 
olis, Md., to take part in Burnside's expedi- 



tion; and Mr. Stevens was seriously wounded 
in the first battle in which he participated, that 
of Roanoke Island. Discharged in March, 
1862, on account of injuries received on the 
battle-field, he enlisted again in May of the 
same year, this time as Orderly Sergeant in 
Company C, Tenth Rhode Island Volunteer 
Infantry. The regiment was sent to Virginia, 
and was stationed at Arlington Heights and 
in the vicinity of Washington until mustered 
out. At the end of his second term of service 
Mr. Stevens, who had done much of the re- 
cruiting of Company A, Sixth Massachusetts 
Regiment, started again for the South, as 
color guard of this company, having refused a 
commission. He joined the Sixth Massachu- 
setts in 1864, went with them to Virginia, 
and remained until the close of their period 
of enlistment. Then, with one hundred and 
thirty-eight men, he went to Nashville, Tenn., 
and served in the quartermaster's department 
until 1865. 

Between his terms of service he taught 
school in New York, Rhode Island, and New 
Jersey, and was awarded a first-grade State 
certificate from each of those States. After 
the close of the war he divided his time for a 
while between teaching and reading law, and 
in 1866 bought a fruit farm in Vineland, N.J. 
This furnished him with profitable recreation 
in summer, and during the school term he 
taught in Cape May City. He was also for a 
time occupied with editorial work, and was in 
the employ of a publishing house, for whom 
he revised text-books. In 1886, under the 
civil service law, he went to. Washington as 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



pension examiner, and was afterward appointed 
special examiner for Western Pennsylvania. 
While in Washington he followed his law 
studies with the same pertinacity of purpose 
that had marked his military career, taking 
the graduate and post-graduate course at the 
National Law School, and receiving the de- 
grees of LL.B. and LL.M.; and in June, 
1888, he was admitted to practise in the 
United States courts, his admission to the 
New Jersey courts following in February, 
1890. Notwithstanding his faithful service 
as a Union soldier and his undoubted qualifi- 
cations for the post of pension examiner, 
when the administration at Washington was 
changed, Mr. Stevens was deposed from office; 
and in 1889 he returned to Vineland, where 
lie has since followed his profession. He 
makes a specialty of commercial law and gen- 
eral practice, and, though not aspiring to 
court practice, has a large clientage in that 
line. Mr. Stevens's whole career has been 
marked by a modest perseverance which 
quietly surmounts all obstacles, tlie innate 
force of Ills character and his intellectual 
acumen and clearness invariably carrying him 
to a position at tlic front. 

July 3, 1876, he was married to Jennie M. 
Armstrong, of Tuckahoe, N.J., daughter of 
John and Sarah J. (Westcott) Armstrong and 
a member of an old New Jersey family. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stevens have one child, Henjamin, 
who was born June 30, 1883. 

In politics Mr. Stevens is an ardent Demo- 
crat, and has served as delegate to many im- 
portant conventions. He was made a Free 



Mason in New York State in 1872, and is now 
a member of Vineland Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
and Eureka Chapter; has been an Odd Fel- 
low since 1865; and is now Past Grand of 
Hobah Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he was the founder. But 
one other charter member of this lodge be- 
sides Mr. Stevens is now living. He is Past 
Regent of the Royal Arcanum, which he or- 
ganized in Vineland; is one of the charter 
members of the Order of Knights of Honor, 
and has been Grand Dictator of the State; is 
Past Master of Vineland Grange; belongs also 
to the Order of Knights of Malta; is Treas- 
urer of the Order of Chosen Friends ; has been 
active in Building and Loan Association 
affairs, and is Treasurer of one branch and at- 
torney for two others. He is likewise a jirom- 
inent member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, and belongs to several other social 
organizations. Mr. Stevens attends and sup- 
ports the Methodist church, of which his wife 
is a member; but he is still loyal to the faith 
of his fathers, and is a consistent P'ricnd in 
belief anil practice. 



—♦-•••-*— 



(shames romeyn iioagland, a.m.. 

Judge of Cumberland County, New 
Jersey, was born in Griggstown, Somer- 
set County, this State, March 7, 1832, son of 
Peter W. and Mary (Cruser) Hoagland. He 
is of the old Dutch stock that formed the 
strength of early New York, tracing his de- 
scent from pioneer ancestors. 

His grandfather, Christopher Hoagland, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



one of a long line of Christophers. He was 
born in Griggstown in 1764, and spent his life 
on a farm that had been held by the family for 
many generations, and is now owned by his 
grandchildren. He was a member of the 
Central Church, as it was then called, at Si.x 
Mile Run, now Franklin Park. His first 
wife, who was Miss Petronella Wyckoff, was 
the mother of his children. She dying, he 
married Miss Ann Quick, who died without 
issue. 

Peter W. Hoagland, the father of Judge 
Hoagland, was born on September 10, 1794, 
in Griggstown ; and, like his father, Christo- 
pher was content to pass his days in that 
vicinity, engaged in the peaceful jnirsuit of 
agriculture. He was at one time a member of 
the Light Horse Company of Militia. He 
died in May, 1S82. His wife, who was born 
in Mapleton, Mercer County, N.J., was a 
daughter of Alexander Cruser, and was also a 
descendant of one of the sturdy Knickerbocker 
colonists of New York. She died November 
16, 1 86 1. Mr. and Mrs. Peter W. Hoagland 
were members of the old Dutch Reformed 
church. The}' reared a family of five chil- 
dren, namely: Christopher, now living at 
Franklin Park, N.J.; Alexander, now in Cun- 
ningham, Kan. ; a daughter who died in 1892; 
James Romeyn, the subject of this sketch; 
and Peter V., a resident of Fairview, 111. 

James Romeyn Hoagland attended the 
schools near his home until fourteen years of 
age, when he entered the grammar school con- 
nected with Rutgers College, New Brunswick. 
There he prepared for college, and, entering 



Rutgers in the fall of 1848, was graduated in 
the class of 1852, with the degree of A.B. 
He is justly very proud of his Alma Mater, 
which has given some strong men to the world. 
He read law for three years with Mercer 
Beasley, of Trenton, now Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of the State, taking the degree 
of A.M. in the mean time, and in 1855 was 
admitted to the bar at Trenton. The follow- 
ing spring he began to practise law at Mill- 
stone, Somerset County, where he sojourned 
six months, and, then returning home, re- 
mained till March, 1857. At that time he 
located in Bridgeton and formed a partnership 
with D. H. Smock, which was dissolved at 
the end of a year. Since 1S58 he has man- 
aged all his business without an associate; 
and, as his clientage is a large one, he has 
had very little leisure time. 

In point of practice he is the oldest attor- 
ney in the city, and the many offices he has 
efficiently filled make him one of the most 
prominent lawyers in the State. In 1865 he 
was appointed by Governor Parker Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for this county, and when his five- 
year term was completed he was reappointed 
by Governor Randolph. The three succeed- 
ing chief magistrates. Governors Beadle, Mc- 
Clellan, and Abbott, retained him in office, 
so that his term of service as Prosecutor of 
the Pleas for Cumberland County covered 
twenty-four years; and during that time he 
was appointed twice to fill the same office for 
Cape May County, ser\-ing from 1873 till 
1883. In 1S89 he resigned his position as 
Prosecutor in order to accept that of Judge of 



i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Cumberland County, conferred upon him by 
Governor Green ; and he was reappointed Judge 
by Governor Wertz. Judge Hoagland in his 
official capacity has been connected with some 
criminal cases famous in the history of New 
Jersey, notably that of Charles K. Landis for 
murder. He has occupied other important 
official positions, filling the office of City So- 
licitor one year and that of Solicitor for the 
Board of Chosen Freeholders six or eight 
years. He has been connected with the 
Bridgeton National Bank since its incorpora- 
tion, being one of its founders and an origi- 
nal stockholder and Director. Judge Hoag- 
land served nine months -in the army at the 
time of the war, as Captain of Company G, 
Twenty-fourth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
having recruited the company himself in Sep- 
tember, 1862. The regiment was incorporated 
with the Army of the Potomac, and he took 
part in the battles of Fredericksburg and 
Chancellorsville. 

January 31, 1X67, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary J. Garretson, of Frank- 
lin Park, Somerset County, N.J., daughter of 
John and Catherine (Riker) Garretson. His 
wife's ancestors came from Holland in Colo- 
nial times. Judge and Mrs. Hoagland have 
the following children: Mary Cruser, born 
November 4, 1867; I'"ranklin Flmcr, born 
March 6, 1S72, now reading law with his 
father; Romeyn J., born l-'ebruary 14, 1875, 
a graduate of the West Jersey Academy, at 
present employed in the post-office; and 
Nellie P., born April 16, 1880. 

Judge Hoagland was active in politics until 



appointed to his present office. He was a 
member of the Common Council for the Third 
Ward for a year, was delegate from this dis- 
trict in 1876 to the Democratic National Con- 
vention at St. Louis that nominated Samuel J. 
Tilden for President, and has attended many 
gubernatorial conventions. A Free Mason in 
good standing, he belongs to Evening Star 
Lodge of Bridgeton, of which he is a charter 
member. He attends and supports the Second 
Presbyterian Church, of which his wife is a 
member. Judge Hoagland has a beautiful 
residence at 53 Lake Street, Bridgeton, which 
he erected in 1873. 




ON. GEORGE W. PAYNE, Mayor 
of Millville, N.J., was born in this 
city, September 7, 1843, son of 
Charles G. and Thankful (Van Hook) Payne. 
He comes of a strong old family of Eng- 
lish origin. His grandfather, Macey Payne, 
was a seafaring man; and his uncle. Captain 
Levi Payne, was a well-known New Jersey 
mariner. 

Charles G. Payne was born in Millville, 
February 18, 1820. He was left an orphan at 
the age of seven years, and grew u]) under the 
care of his brother. Captain Levi Payne, 
whom he accompanied on sea voyages. The 
greater part of iiis life was sjient on the water 
until he reached manhood, and lie then sought 
a permanent location on terra Jin/ia, learning 
the trade of glass blowing and establishing a 
home in Millville. He worked at his trade 
forty odd years, retiring a short time previous 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



17 



to his death, which occurred in 1891. His 
wife, who was a daughter of William Van 
Hook, was born at what was then known as 
Schooner Landing, a point four miles south of 
the business centre of Millville. She was the 
great-grand-daughtcr of Dr. Van Hook, who 
came to Millville from Darmstadt, Germany, 
and settled permanently here. Two of his 
sons, Benjamin and Lawrence, who also were 
physicians, were prominent in the early part 
of this century, and particularly active during 
the War of 181 2. Dr. I,awrence Van Hook 
was the grandfather of Mrs. Payne. William 
Van Hook, her father, was engaged in farming 
for many years, and in the latter part of his 
life was in the employ of Whitehall, Talem & 
Co. in Millville. Mrs. Payne died in Ajjril, 
1893. She was for over fifty years a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which 
her husband also belonged. Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles G. Payne were the parents of fifteen 
children, eight of whom are living to-day, 
namely: George W., the subject of this 
sketch; Kate, wife of Harry Vote, of Pliila- 
dclphia; Mary, wife of Jeremiah Corson, of 
Millville; Fannie, wife of Frank Hoardman, 
of Millville; Jennie, wife of Ralph Kilving- 
ton, of Wilmington, Del. ; Nora, wife of 
Michael Durkin, of Millville; Rena, wife of 
George Doughty, of the same place; and 
Charles, Jr., who resides in Philadelphia. 

George W. Payne began to go to school 
when five years of age, and attended regularly 
until he was eleven. It was hard for the 
father to supply the needs of his rajiidly grow- 
ing family; and the eldest son, when eleven 



years of age, was put to work in the glass fac- 
tory. Apprenticed at the age of thirteen, he 
served four years as a glass blower. Then the 
war broke out and business was suspeniled, and 
he seized the oj^portunit)' to attend school for 
a year. Previous to that time he had studied 
for six months under the tuition of old Dr. 
Parker, whose death made it necessary for him 
to seek another teacher. After completing 
his year at school, young Payne continued 
his studies for a while under the Rev. Mr. 
Northup, working during the day and jiursuing 
the paths of learning at night; and when Mr. 
Northup was called away he studied alone. In 
this way he obtained a practical education, 
whose lessons were all the more lasting for 
being acquired under such difficulties. The 
trade of glass blowing once learned, he fol- 
lowed it at intervals; and he has done so 
much for his fellow -craftsmen that his name 
is widely known and revered. 

In 1874 Mr. l^ayne entered on his political 
career, being elected on the Republican ticket 
by the citiz.ens of the Second District of Cum- 
berland County to the State legislature. He 
was re-elected in 1875 and 1876, and during 
his second term he was Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Corporations. In 1877 he was ac- 
tive in pushing a bill entitled "An act for 
the better securing of wages to workmen and 
laborers in the State of New Jersey" — a bill 
for which he had worked hard the two previous 
years, but which he did not succeed in carry- 
ing till 1877. It was a law to prevent the 
payment of employees in punch orders, due 
bills, etc., which were redeemable onlv at the 



i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



company's store; and the introductory clause 
read as follows: "That it shall not be lawful 
for any person or corporation in this State to 
issue for payment of labor any order or other 
paper whatsoever unless the same purport to 
be redeemable for its face value in lawful 
money of the United States b)' the person giv- 
ing or issuing the same." This was the first 
general act of the kind passed in. New Jersey, 
and it has since been amended to better pro- 
tect the workingmen. Mr. Payne was op- 
posed by many strong men, including the 
Democratic nominee for Governor, Mr. Mc- 
Gill, and was loyally supported by the present 
Governor of the State, Mr. Griggs, wiio was 
the Republican nominee. The law was an 
especial boon to the glass blowers, establish- 
ing a cash basis for their labor; and Mr. 
Payne incurred the enmity of manufacturers 
throughout the .State, and was for some time 
proscribed from being employed. When his 
term as Representative was completed he was 
made Assessor of the old Second Ward of 
Millviile, what is now the Second and Fourth 
Wards, and held the ])osition for eight years. 
In March, 1889, he was elected to the Com- 
mon Council, and, after serving a few months, 
resigned in order to accejit the position of 
superintendent of the glass works of Rankins 
& La Mar at Atlanta, Ga. Returning to 
Millviile in 1892, he was again elected to the 
Council, and served three years, taking part 
in important rulings as a member of the 
Finance, Water, and Railroad Committees. 
In March, 1895, he was elected Mayor of 
Millviile; and it is needless to add that he is 



one of the best mayors the city has ever had, 
fearless in the discharge of his duty and 
aiming always to foster the best interests of 
all classes. 

Mayor Payne was the first National Secretary 
of the National Flint Glass Workers' Union, 
which embraces the United States and Can- 
ada; and he held his position three years, virt- 
ually redeeming the Union from chaos, and 
placing it on a firm financial basis. He was 
for twelve years Representative to the national 
body through successive re-elections, and 
served on the most important committees. A 
fine watch, properly inscribed, was presented 
to him by the Union; and he has a handsome 
chain, which was the gift of the employees at 
Atlanta, where he was superintendent. 

December g, 1865, Mr. Payne was married 
to Mary A., daughter of Captain John Stone- 
hill, of Millviile. Mrs. Payne was born in 
Cape May County, New Jersey, June 22, 1846. 
Her father was of English birth. Mr. and 
Mrs. Payne have eight children; namely, John 
C, Reginald W. , William S., Georgiana, 
Lovina, Nellie, Harry II., and Anna. 

Mr. Payne is a niemiier of the Order of the 
Golden I'",agle, and is Past Chief of the Select 
Council, the State organization. He belongs 
to Shekinah Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and Rich- 
mond Chapter; and is Past Commander of the 
Mystic Chain. Me is also a Junior of the 
O. U. A. M. He is a member of the First 
Methodist ICpiscopal Church of Millviile, ad- 
hering loyally to the faith of his fathers. 
His residence, which he built several years 
ago, is at 229 Vine Street. 



BIOGRAPHICAL kKVIEW 



19 




'ON. ROBERT MORE, the first mem- 
ber of the Republican party sent 
from Cumberland County, New Jer- 
sey, to the State legislature, was born May 
17, 1S19, on a farm in Hopewell, this State, 
son of Azariah and Lydia (Dare) More. He 
comes of an ancient family, the name More, it 
is said, having originated as a surname among 
the Scottish Highland clans eight centuries 
ago, and having lived there tlirough the days 
of the Covenanters. In tlie time of James II. 
representatives of the family were found in 
the north of Ireland. 

Mr. More's great-grandfather, Jacob More, 
who was a New Jersey man, was born August 
17, 1 7 10. His wife, Abigail Feck, an Eng- 
lish lady of rare beauty of character and 
highly educated, was born February 7, 171 i. 
She exercised a wonderful inlluence over her 
children, whom she trained by example as 
well as by precept. After the death of her 
husband, having no way of conveyance, she 
walked from above Shiloh to Greenwich to all 
church services, both week days and Sabbaths. 
She dietl July 23, 1794- The children of 
Jacob and Abigail (Peck) More were: John, 
the grandfather of our subject, l^orn March 3, 
173S; Azariah, born July 23, 1739; Joseph, 
April 12, 1742; Ruth, July i, 1744; Mary, 
March 2, 1746; Martha, December 13, 1747; 
and Hashaba, March i, 1750. 

John More, eldest son of Jacob More, was a 
native of Hopewell, N.J., and by occupation 
a farmer and weaver. In the Revolutionary 
War he had some trying experiences. The 
officer of the day having called for three vol- 



unteers to go as spies among the enemy, en- 
camped on the Delaware, he, with a Mr. 
Mulford and a Mr. Fisher, undertook the 
hazardous venture, and captured the guns and 
other arms of a small band of men who came 
out to cut wood. The men escaped through 
the proximity of the army to which they were 
attached; but Mr. More retained the captured 
arms, and one gun is still in the possession of 
the family. While on this expedition the 
three spies were so pressed for food that Mul- 
ford killed and skinned a black snake, which 
he concealed and ate little by little, fearing 
that his companions would take it from iiim. 
More and Mulford got to their boat, and 
reached camp safely; but Fislierdid not return 
to New Jersey. After his term of military 
service was completeil, Mr. More returned to 
his farm, and spent the rest of his days in the 
peaceful pursuit of agriculture. He married 
Rachel Moore, born August 25, 1745, and 
they reared a large family, namely: Eunice, 
born February 24, 1766; Azariah, born Feb- 
ruary 13, 176S; Abigail, born March 28, 
1770; Lois, June 8, 1772; Ruth, November 
22, 1773; Hannah, April 14, 1776; Lewis, 
February 13, 1779; John, February 8, 17S1; 
Sarah, May 23, 17S3; and Jacob and Rachel, 
twins, in June, 1784. (For other interesting 
facts concerning the family see .Shroud's 
"History of the Fenwick Colony, 15ridgeton, 
1876.") Azariah Moce, the brother of Grand- 
father John More, was also a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War. 

Azariah More, the father of the subject of 
this sketch, was born on a farm in Upper 



20 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ilopevvcll, N.J., and spent his life near the 
place of his birth. A successful farmer and 
weaver, he was a prominent citizen of the 
town, and widely known and respected. He 
was a stanch supporter of the Presbyterian 
church, and was a member of the Building 
Committee of the church in Dcerfield, N.J. 
He died on October i, 1S45, in the house 
which he had built, and where his children 
were born. December i, 1794, Azariah More 
was married to Lydia Dare, who died April 4, 
1830. She was a member of one of the oldest 
families in this part of the country. Mrs. 
Lydia D. More became the mother of twelve 
children, nine of whom attained maturity, 
growing up in Hopewell township, and learn- 
ing to take a part in the weaving industry 
and the work of the farm. They were: 
Daniel, David, three who died at birth, Abi- 
gail, Enoch, Josiah, Henrietta, Elizabeth, 
George Washington, and Robert. ]?ut two 
are living to-day — Josiah, a resident of I^ed 
Willow County, Nebraska, and Robert. 

Enoch More followed the sea for over forty 
3'ears as master of a vessel, and had ch.arge of 
some of the largest boats afloat in liis day. 
He was captain of the steamer "Clyde," 
which transported Jefferson Davis and other 
captured Confederates to Fortress Monroe, 
luioch More was also assistant surveyor vvith 
John C. I'^remont, accompanying him on his 
expedition through the great West. David 
More, another brother, was a sea captain for a 
number of years. He died on board his ship 
at New Orleans; and his body was tenderly 
cared for by his Masonic brethren, who buried 



it in a leaden casket, that it might be moved 
if desired. Henrietta More, one of the 
sisters, lost her life on the ill-fated steamer 
"Henry Clay," which was burned on the 
North River. 

Robert More was engaged in his youth in 
farming and weaving on the family homestead. 
After his father's death he took charge of the 
farm; and in 1S75 he purchased the Davis mill 
property, making his home there, and operat- 
ing the mill, and also managing a store. In 
1S83 he removed to Bridgeton, and engaged 
in the manufacture of glass as a member of 
the firm of More, Jonas & More, pooling his 
capital in that industry, and employing a large 
number of men. He still owns three farms 
in Hopewell, and as a business man and real 
estate owner occupies a prominent jiosition in 
the community. 

Mr. More has been twice married. His 
first wife. Miss Emily Bivin, of Shiloh, left 
one child, Caroline, who is now the wife of 
William E. Riley, a clothing merchant of 
Bridgeton. His second wife, who before mar- 
riage was Miss Elizabeth Cake, of Dcerfield, 
died July 30, 1S92, leaving five children — 
Robert, Jr., a member of the firm of More, 
Jonas & More; Richard, a member of the 
same firm; Azariah, who is in the glass busi- 
ness in Fairton; John T., who is connected 
with his hrotluT-in-hiw in lousiness in Bridge- 
ton; and lilizabeth C, who is at home with 
her father. Robert More, Jr., and his brother 
Richard have increased their business so that 
they now have one of the largest glass plants 
in the State of New Jersey. They have run 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the works to their full capacity ten months in 
the year ever since they began business. 

While residing on his father's farm in 
Hopewell, Mr. More held different local 
ofifices, ably serving as Collector, trustee of 
the almshouse, Clerk of the Board of Chosen 
l">eeholders — in fact, filling all offices within 
the gift of the town except that of Assessor. 
He helped to organize the Republican party 
in 1S55, and in t 856 was nominated for the 
Assembly. Elected in 1857 by a big major- 
ity, on the Republican ticket, Representative 
to the legislature, he had the honor to be the 
first man sent to that body by his party in this 
county. He was again in the legislature in 
1866-68, and, being nominated for State Sen- 
ator in i860, at the time of the John Brown 
excitement, was beaten by only seven votes. 
In 1S67 he introduced in the legislature a res- 
olution authorizing the placing of a portrait of 
Lincoln in the Assembly chamber beside that 
of Washington, and was appointed Chairman 
of the House Committee to procure the same; 
antl on the fifty-eighth anniversary of the birth 
of Lincoln he delivered an eloquent speech 
in honor of the occasion. In 1867 Mr. More 
was made Chairman of the House Committee 
to draft rules for the government of that body. 
On February 9, 1865, he was engaged in the 
debate in the House concerning the Fifteenth 
Amendment to the Constitution of the United 
States, and supported the amendment by a 
powerful speech, which was largely published 
and quoted from. He was instrumental, too, 
in obtaining the passage of "An act to pro- 
hibit the sale of liquor on election day." Mr. 



More is still a member of the Presbyterian 
Church of Deerfield, on whose Building Com- 
mittee his father served, and was fourteen 
years an officer of the church and many years 
superintendent of tlie West Branch Sunday- 
school. His family likewise are all memliers 
of the Presbyterian church. 



DGAR DARE, a busy and prosperous 
farmer of Lawrence townshi|), was 
born November 16, 183 1, in Stow Creek 
township, this county, son of Abel S. and 
Jane (Husted) Westcott Dare. On the pater- 
nal side he is of English origin. David Dare, 
his grandfather, was a tailor by trade, antl 
lived in Roadstown, this county. He and his 
wife had a number of children, of whom 
Amelia, Isaac, and Abel S. reached maturity. 
Abel S. Dare was a native of Roadstown, 
born on May 3, 1803. When a youth he went 
to live on a farm with Richard Garrison, his 
brother-in-law; and, excepting a few nmnths 
spent in Northern New York, he remained 
there until his marriage, when he rented a 
farm in Stow Creek township. He was so 
successful that in the course of time he be- 
came the owner of four good farms. He voted 
the Democratic ticket, was elected a member of 
the Town Committee, and also served as .Sur- 
veyor of Highways. Abel S. was twice mar- 
ried. His first wife, Susan, born on Novem- 
ber 19, 1804, daughter of Daniel Husted, 
died leaving one son, Ebenezer. Ebenezer, 
who was born November 5, 1829, died o\\ the 
homestead in 1876, in the forty-seventh year 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of his age. Later Abel S. married his first 
wife's half-sister, Jane (Husted) Westcott, a 
widow. She had four children by him, 
namely: Edgar, the subject of this sketch; 
David, born October 6, 1833; Smith, born 
December 19, 1835; ^'""^1 Maria, born March 
17, 183S, who married Norton L. Paullin, of 
Bridgeton, this county. The mother was born 
in I'airfield township, February 7, 1796. Her 
father, Daniel Husted, was an early settler 
and one of the prominent farmers of the town- 
ship. The Husted family were of Swedish 
origin. Some time after his second marriage 
Abel S. Dare moved to Fairfield tovvnshi]), 
and bought a farm near Laning's Wharf, 
where he engaged extensively in general farm- 
ing. He and his wife, who had been mem- 
bers of the Baptist church in Roadstown, were 
admitted to the membership of the Cedarville 
church, wliich lie afterward served as Trustee 
and Collector. He died January 28, 1877, 
aged seventy-four years. His wife passed 
away in August, 1873. 

Fdgar Dare moved with his parents when a 
cliild to l"'airfieUI township. Here during his 
bo)ho()tl lie attended school in winter, and 
worked on tlie farm in sunnner. lie remained 
on the home farm until after his marriage, 
when he took one of his father's farms, con- 
taining about seventy-seven acres, on which he 
still resides. Ten years later, at the time of 
the death of his father, he took the adjoining 
farm of forty acres, and added it to the old 
farm. On the original estate he built a fine 
barn for his stock, thirty by si.xty feet, with 
eighteen-foot posts. Tliis is one of the larg- 



est barns in the vicinity, and is said to be one 
of the best in the county. In 1S83 Mr. Dare 
erected the house in which lie resides. It is 
about thirty by thirty-two feet, of fine archi- 
tectural design. He is engaged in general 
and dairy farming, keeping a good line of 
Guernsey and Jersey stock, having had at fhe 
head a registered animal. For a number of 
yeai's he has also been interested in the culture 
of strawberries, to which he devotes si.\ acres. 
In this his success has been so marked that he 
intends to ship berries directly to New York 
and Boston markets. 

On January 17, 1873, he was married to 
Catherine Bechtel, daughter of Jeremiah Y. 
and Elizabeth (Hendricks) Bechtel. The 
Bechtel family, which is of German origin, 
was founded by George and Mary Ann (Kling- 
man) Bechtel, who came from Germany to 
this country in 174*'). It was perpetuated suc- 
cessively by John, George (second), George, 
Jr., and John, second. The last named, a 
Pennsylvania farmer, was the grandfather of 
Mrs. Dare. Her father, Jeremiah Y. Bechtel, 
was born February 16, 1817, near Pottstown, 
Pa., and there lived until after his marriage 
to Miss Hendricks, of that jilace. Being a 
man of more than the average intelligence 
and education, he taught school for some years, 
but subsequently bought a small farm in 
Brodsboro, where he lived until his removal to 
Reading. There he engaged in the insurance 
business and the care of non-resident jiroperty. 
He was a member of the City Council, and 
died in Reading on November 16, 1887. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bechtel had five children, three of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



whom came to maturity. These were: John 
H. Bechtel, of Philadelphia, who is a teacher 
of elocution in Philadelphia, Pa. ; Catherine, 
now Mrs. Dare; and Elizabeth, the wife of 
Wilbur Bateman, of Cedarville, N.J. The 
mother died on September 19, 1S55, when 
Mrs. Dare was but ten years of age. Both 
parents were prominent members of the Dutch 
Reformed church. Mrs. Dare, who was born 
near Reading, March 4, 1845, lived with her 
brother in Salem until her marriage. Of her 
six children, one died in infancy. The others 
are: Jennie P., Lynn Y., John H. B., Ora E., 
and Norton Paullin. Mr. Dare and his family 
attend and support the First Bajitist Church 
of Cedarville, Mrs. Dare and the eldest daugh- 
ter being members. 



BOYD NIXON, a prominent attorney 
of Bridgeton, was born here, August i, 
1847, son of William G. and Sarah 
Boyd (Potter) Nixon. He comes of an old 
and well-known famil}', being descended from 
John Nixon, a husbandman, who lived in Phil- 
adelphia in 1683, three years after the arrival 
of William Penn. In 1716 John Nixon set- 
tled on a farm in Fairfield township, this 
county. The farm was afterward retained in 
the possession of his descendants until about 
ten years ago. 

William G. Nixon was born in Fairfield, 
December g, 18 18. Shortly after leaving 
school he obtained a position as clerk in the 
Kensington Bank at Philadelphia. Some 
time after, before he attained his majority, he 



was hired as clerk in the Cumberland Bank of 
Bridgeton. On the death of Mr. Reed, the. 
cashier of this institution, Mr. Nixon, who 
was scarcely twenty-one, was chosen to fill 
the vacancy, and thereafter served in that ca- 
pacity for over fifty years. He was finally 
elected President of the bank, the duties of 
which office he has since efficiently dis- 
charged. For many years Mr. Nixon has 
ranked among the leading financiers of South 
Jersey. The bank, which was organized in 
1 8 16, and ranks No. 68 among the banks of 
the Union, is one of the oldest and most reli- 
able in the State. Mrs. William G. Nixon, 
a daughter of Colonel James Boyd Putter, of 
Bridgeton, had two chililren, of whom J. Boyd 
Nixon was the first-born. The other, Will- 
iam Barron, was accidentally killed in Phila- 
delphia, on September 3, 1893. 

J. Boyd Nixon prepared for college in the 
W^est Jersey Academy Prejjaratory School. 
He graduated from Princeton in 1867, taking 
in regular course the degrees of A.B. and 
A.M. Ill 1870 he entered the law office of his 
uncle, the Hon. John T. Nixon, of Bridgeton, 
afterward United .States Judge, with whom he 
remained until qualified for admission to the 
bar. His knowledge was broadened by travel 
in luu-ope during tlie greater part of 1868. 
On June 13, 1S70, he became a memjjer of the 
firm of Potter & Nixon, of which the senior 
member was Colonel William E. Potter. 
After continuing nearly twenty-four years, dur- 
ing which a large general practice was success- 
fully handled, the eoi)artnership was dissolved 
by mutual consent on January 11, 1S94. Mr. 



24 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Nixon is counsel for tlie Ciimbeiiand National 
Bank. He was a Director of this institution 
for several years, and in 1890 he was elected 
Vice-President. A Republican in political 
belief, the only office for which he was ever a 
candidate was that of City Solicitor, which he 
held several years. 

In 1 87 1, June 13, Mr. Nixon was united in 
marriage with Miss Ellen Madeline Scull, of 
Phoenixville, Pa., grand-daughter of David 
Reeves, who built the Cumberland Nail and 
Iron Works in 1814. Mr. and Mrs. Nixon 
ha\'e six children — Mary Reeves, Mabel, 
Noiina, ICleanor Ilarmar, lioyd, and Barron 
Rowan. Mr. Nixon has lived for many years 
in a beautiful home, situated within one hun- 
dred \ards of the place where he was born. 
He has ti'avelled extensively in the jiast nine 
years, spending the winter in Florida; and he 
devotes much of his leisure time to hunting 
and fishing, and contributes interesting articles 
on these and other pastimes to Forest and 
Stnain. A man of culture, he takes an inter- 
est in art, and is a member of the Philadel- 
phia Art Chd). In social matters he is a true 
cosmopolitan. 




HOMAS URBAN HARRIS, President 
)f the Bridgeton National Bank, was 
born on October 22, 1831, in the village 
of Pairton, I'airfickl townshi]), Cumberland 
County, N.J., in the house built by his grand- 
father. He is the son of Theophilus Elmer 
and Lydia (Dixon) Harris, and is of Puritan 
ancestry. 



The first of his family in this part of the 
country was Thomas Harris, who came with a 
number of colonists from Fairfield, Conn., 
and settled in what is now Fairfield, N.J., 
which they named for their Connecticut home. 
Thomas Harris's will was probated at Tren- 
ton, January 24, 1750. His son, Captain 
Thomas Harris, was born in November, 17 10. 
A leading man of the community, he went to 
England in 1750, in behalf of the people of 
P^airfield, N.J., and made an unsuccessful 
effort to perfect the title of land in the south- 
ern part of the township. He brought home 
a large folio volume of the works of the Rev. 
John F'lavel, the eminent Non-conformist di- 
vine, which is one of the most treasured pos- 
sessions of his great-great-grandson and name- 
sake, Tiiomas W. Harris. Ca[itain Harris 
died April 27, 1783. 

His son Ephraim was the next in this line, 
liphraini Harris was elected to the legislature 
of New Jersey several times, and was once 
Speaker of the House. He was a member of 
the legislature in 1776, when the constitution 
of the State was framed. Active in religious 
as well as secular matters, he was a Ruling- 
Elder of the old stone church (Presbyterian) 
of F'"airfield; and Dr. Whitakcr, the historian 
of that church, says he was the most intelli- 
gent man in the session. He died No\ember 
2, 1794, in liis sixty-third year. He was 
twice married. Thomas Harris, son of 
liphraini, was born in F'airfield, September 9, 
1759. A farmer and innkeeper, he was a life- 
long resident of F'airfield, where he was highly 
esteemed, his kinilly ilisposition winning the 



1 



r 




■Ty.^'> ;-y;gg'-'a '.Ti^iirr^ca -vxrv 



THOMAS U. HARRIS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27 



regard of all. He was at one time nominee 
for sheriff, and was defeated by only a few 
votes. He died March 3, 1825. He and his 
wife were the parents of Theophilus Elmer, 
and grandparents of Thomas Urban Harris, 
who has their pictures, which lie values 
highly. 

Theophilus Elmer Harris was born in Fair- 
field, January 28, 1796, and spent the greater 
part of his life in his native town engaged in 
the pursuit of agriculture. He, too, was a 
leader in the community; and often in the 
evening he was the centre of an attentive 
circle gathered in the country store, the club- 
room of those days, to whom he would read 
from the few newspapers available, many of 
his auditors being either unable to read or too 
poor to buy the papers. He was a strong 
Whig, and was elected by his party to many 
responsible offices, including that of Sheriff 
of the county, which he held from 1848 to 
1S51; and he was Township Assessor for 
many years. When the Republican party was 
organized he was one of the first members, 
and he was prominent as an anti-slavery 
man. In the latter part of his life he was a 
memlier of the Presbyterian church. He was 
united in marriage on February 12, 18 17, with 
Miss Eydia Dixon, daughter of Urban Dixon, 
of Fairfield; and ten children were born of 
this union. 15y a second marriage he had two 
children. 

Thomas Urban Harris was one of the chil- 
dren by the first marriage. He received his 
early education in the old stone school-house 
in Fairfield. He remained with his father 



till the spring of 1850, when he entered the 
employ of Alexander Stratton, who had a store 
on the corner of Commerce and Laurel Street.s, 
Bridgeton. There he obtained his first ideas 
of business, and was such an apt jiupil that in 
1855 he became associated with his employer's 
brother, George Stratton, and under the style 
of Stratton & Harris they managed a general 
store until 1859. In that year Mr. Harris 
sold his interest in the firm, and embarked in 
the boot, shoe, and leather trade, carrying on 
business on Commerce Street, near the river, 
until 1869, when he moved to his present lo- 
cation, 78 Commerce Street. Only two men 
in Bridgeton have been in business longer than 
Mr. Harris, and he is now the oldest leather 
merchant in the city. 

He was one of the originators of the Bridge- 
ton Saving Fund and Building Association, 
which differed from the Building and Loan 
Association, being based on what is callcil 
the serial plan. It was founded in June, 
1865, and was the first of its kind. Mr. 
Harris was elected Secretary, and drafted the 
by-laws ; and he has held the office of Secre- 
tary continuously since, attending every 
monthly meeting but one. The Association 
has had a very successful experience, loaning 
millions of dollars, and has practically built 
many of the fine residences of the city. Its 
success gave to Mr. Harris a certain prestige 
as a financier, and led to his being called to 
other positions of importance. In August, 
1872, B. F. Lee, Treasurer of the West 
Jersey Marl Transportation Company, was 
made clerk of the Supreme Court of New 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Jersey; and Mr. Harris was elected Treasurer 
in his place. This corporation has an exten- 
sive business in fertilizers and marl, the latter 
a deposit found in quantities from ten to four- 
teen feet under the soil of New Jersey. Mr. 
Harris has efficiently filled the office of Treas- 
urer for twenty-four years. 

When the Bridgeton National Bank was or- 
ganized, in 1883, the doors being opened for 
business July 12, he was an original stock- 
holder, and at the first meeting of the stock- 
holders was elected a Director, and at the 
first meeting of the Directors was chosen 
President. The bank commenced business 
with a capital stock of one hundred thousand 
dollars, and now has a surplus of undivided 
profits amounting to one hundred thousand 
dollars, and pays a dividend of ten per cent., 
a record seldom, if ever, equalled. Its de- 
posits average three hundred thousand dol- 
lars. It does a strict and legitimate banking 
business, and has been very fortunate as to 
loans and losses, establishing a reputation for 
strength that makes it one of the best banks 
in Southern New Jersey. The stock is now 
worth more than double the par value. Mr. 
Harris has worked zealously for the welfare of 
this institution; and it is largely through his 
ability and constant watchfulness that it has 
reached its present footing, of which he is 
justly proud. In 1884 a fine brick bank 
building was erected, equipped with safety 
vault, time lock, etc., which has been the 
home of the institution ever since. As a 
business man Mr. Harris has a remarkable 
record, boasting that in forty-five years he 



has never been detained from his duties I)y 
illness. 

He was married August 30, 1853, to Miss 
Mary C. Holmes, of Bridgeton, who was born 
in the town of Fairfield. She died November 
~3i ■'^93- Her children all died in child- 
hood. On April 15, 1896, Mr. Harris was 
married to Miss Isabella Robinson, a native 
of Salem. 

Mr. Harris votes the Republican ticket. 
He was chosen Freeholder for the First Ward 
of Bridgeton, and was presiding officer of the 
board for two years; and he was a member of 
the first City Council. His first wife was a 
member of the Second Presbyterian Church, 
with which he has long been connected. He 
was elected a Ruling Elder when twenty-eight 
years of age, but declined the honor, accept- 
ing it some ten years ago, and conscientiously 
fulfilling his duties since that time. In his 
younger days he was a teacher in the Sunday- 
school, and for some years assistant superin- 
tendent and a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees. He contributes now generously toward 
the support of the Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation. He has a handsome residence at 
188 North Pearl Street, which he erected 
twenty years ago. 




I LIT AM H. PARSONS, a ship- 
builder of Greenwich, was born 
in Port Norris, this county, July 8, 1856. 
His grandfather, who came to this country 
from England, died young, leaving a son, 
Dayton B. Parsons. The latter, born in Port 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



-9 



Norris in the year 1818, grew up in the town 
of his birth. He learned the carpenter's 
trade, and thereafter followed it during the 
greater part of his life. lie was also engaged 
to some extent in agriculture on a farm of his 
own. lie married Miss IClizabeth Thorne, of 
Maurice River township, and became the 
father of seven children, namely: James, who 
lives in Bridgeton, this county; Phcebe, the 
wife of Mr. Richard Norwood, of Solomon, 
Md.; Mary, who married Mr. Wightfield 
Thompson, of Dyer's Creek, Cape May 
County; William H., the subject of this 
sketch; Samuel, now deceased; Albert, also 
deceased; and Anna, who died at the age of 
two years. The father died in 1886, and the 
mother, May ii, 1896, having reached her 
sixty-eighth year. Dayton B. Parsons was a 
man of Christian piety and active virtue. 
From an early age up to the time of his 
death he was a consistent and faithful member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was 
for many years one of the most earnest class 
leaders of the chin^ch in Port Norris. 

William H. Parsons was partly educated in 
the schools of Port Norris. When, about 
1869, his father moved to Bridgeton, he at- 
tended the Bank Street School, an institution 
of considerable reputation at that time. 
When quite young he went into tlie shipyard 
of Blew & Phillips, under which firm he ac- 
quired his knowledge of ship-building. After 
working for Blew & Phillips for five years he 
went to Port Norris, and there established a 
shipyard of his own. Here he remained five 
years also, chiefly occupied in building and 



repairing oyster boats. His next place of 
business was Cedarville, N.J.,. where he plied 
his trade for three years. At the expiration 
of that time he returned to Bridgeton, where 
he again had a yard of his own, anil found so 
much to tlo that he had to employ from twelve 
to- fifteen men in order to fill his contracts. 
From Bridgeton he removed to Port Noriis 
again, established a yard there, and carried it 
On for three years. He then left the State, 
and took up his abode in .Solomon, Md. In 
1890 he sold out his interests in Maryland, 
came to Greenwich, and established his ship- 
yard at Cohansey River. Here he has since 
built six new oyster boats, estimated to be 
worth from two to five thousand dollars, be- 
sides doing a large amount of repairing. Mr. 
Parsons has unusual facilities for conducting 
his work. Among them is a marine railway, 
by which the boats and everything hard to 
move are transported by steam. This method 
is used nowhere else on the creek, except at 
Bridgeton. Twenty men are employed in the 
yard . 

On November 27, 1S7S, Mr. Parsons mar- 
ried Miss L. Emily P'oster, of Bridgeton, a 
daughter of Elmer Foster, a former resident 
of Cedarville. Born of this marriage were: 
David B., Lizzie, Irene, and Ruth. Mr. Par- 
sons gives the support of his vote to the Re- 
publican party. He is a member of the order 
of Knights of Pythias, of Port Norris, and be- 
longs to the Cohansey Lodge of Red Men of 
Bridgeton. Like his father, he is a man of 
deeply religious nature, and has always been 
a conscientious member of the Baptist church. 



30 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lie has held the double office of Deacon and 
Sunday-school superintendent for the past two 
years in Greenwich. He is also active in 
other church work, and wields an influence for 
good throughout the community. Mrs. Par- 
sons is a member of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Bridgeton, the former home of her 
husband. Mr. and Mrs. Parsons are among 
the most esteemed citizens of Greenwich. 




1 1 DMAS M. TICK, of Deerfield Street, 
one of the largest dealers in horses and 
cattle in South Jersey, was born March 3, 
1 85 1, on the farm that is his home to-day. 
He is a son of Cornelius C. and Rebecca S. 
(Woodruff) Tice, and comes of old New Jersey 
stock, of English origin. His great-grand- 
father, John Tice, was one of the early resi- 
dents of Williamstown, N.J. His grand- 
father, Thomas M. Tice, probably born in 
Williamstown, was a shoemaker by trade, and 
also a capable farmer. Soon after his mar- 
riage Thomas moved to Malaga, Gloucester 
County, and thence to Klackwater, where he 
was emjiloyed as a teamster for some time. 
Finally he came to Deerfield and purchased a 
farm, which was his home for the remainder of 
his life. He voted with the Whigs, but took 
no active part in political matters. His death 
occurred in January, 1865. He married Han- 
nah Richman, a daughter of Daniel Richman, 
a mill-owner at Willow Grove. By her he 
became the father of four children, namely: 
John, who lives on the line between Salem 
and Cumberland Counties; Cornelius C, the 



father of Thomas M. ; William, now deceased, 
who resided for some time on a farm near 
Deerfield; and Josiah S., a resident of Deer- 
field Street. 

Cornelius C. Tice was born at Malaga, No- 
vember 17, 1827. He was six years of age 
when his father removed to Blackwater. Here 
he acquired a good practical education. After 
his father's death he worked his share of the 
farm for a while. He then disposed of it, and 
purchased the fine farm of one hundred acres 
now occupied by his son. On the homestead 
he made many improvements, erecting the 
main barn and wagon-house, and developing 
the property into one of the finest farms in 
Deerfield. He lived there twenty-four years, 
engaged in general farming, grain culture, and 
stock raising. In that time he purchased two 
other farms, one of sixty-three acres and one 
of forty-four acres. For some of his land, 
which was of the best in the township, he paid 
over one hundred dollars an acre. He is now 
enjoying a well-earned rest on his homestead 
in Deerfield, having retired some time ago. 
His wife is a daughter of Almerine E. Wood- 
ruff, a farmer of Deerfield. Mr. and Mrs. 
Tice are members of the Presbyterian church. 
They are the parents of three children, 
namely: Thomas M., the subject of this arti- 
cle; Almerine W., who lives on his father's 
farm; and Mamie, who is with her parents. 

Thomas M. Tice received a good education 
in the Deerfield schools and the South Jersey 
Institute at Bridgeton. He helped his father 
about the home farm until of age, and then 
purchased an estate in the northern part of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3t 



Deerfield, where he engaged in general farm- 
ing and stock raising. He began to take an 
interest in raising cattle when he was eigh- 
teen, so that he was no novice when he started 
for himself. Subsequently he became skilled 
also in dressing meat, and he developed this 
branch of industry till he has become one of 
the largest dealers in dressed beef in this part 
of the State. He traded with his father for 
the home farm of one hundred acres, and he 
l)urchascd fifty-three acres of adjoining land. 
He has more barn room than any farmer in 
the locality, one building being fitted with 
fifty-five stalls, and another with seventy-five. 
Yet they are hardly enough for his cattle. 
On the dairy farm he has one of the finest 
dairy barns in the State. It is thirty by 
ninety feet, has a patent cutter for fodder and 
hay, and is supplied with water, so that the 
cattle can be watered in the stalls. Here he 
keeps from thirty to forty head of cattle 
the year round. He ships as much as three 
hundred quarts of milk daily to Philadelphia 
and Atlantic City. P^or some time he has 
made a specialty of registered Holsteins, 
and at present he has some of the finest 
cattle of that breed in the State. He 
has also some imported Beauty of Norwood 
stock, worth three hundred dollars apiece. 
Within a few years he has added horses to his 
line of live stock, buying in the West and 
selling largely in this State, at Monmouth, 
Ocean, Atlantic, and Cape May. In 1895 he 
sold four hundred horses. He is also engaged 
in breeiling fine horses, and he makes a spe- 
cialty of matching teams. Since August, 



1895, he has handled two thousand, five hun- 
dred head of cattle, including five hundred 
fresh cows, more than any stock raiser in 
South Jersey. Mr. Tice travels extensively 
in buying and selling", and transacts the 
greater part of his large business through the 
Cumberland Bank. 

Mr. Tice married Miss Abbie R. Eastlack, 
daughter of Samuel Eastlack, of Richwood, 
and has two promising boys — H. Royden and 
Harold S. He votes the Republican ticket, 
but takes no active part in politics, his busi- 
ness requiring all his time and attention. He 
and his wife are members of the old Presby- 
terian church at Deerfield Street. 




ON. ISAAC MULFORD SMALLEY, 

of l?ridgeton, was born in Bowen- 

town, Cumberland County, May 8, 

1830. His ])arents were Henry L. and 
Tabitha (Mulford) Smalley. His grand- 
father, the Rev. Henry Smalley, came from 
Piscataway, Md., about the year 1780, and 
settled in Roadstown, this county, where he 
served as pastor of the Baptist church for half 
a century. The Rev. Mr. Smalley died in 

1 83 1, having "fought the good fight and kept 
the faith." He left three sons — John, Henry 
L. , and William. 

Henry L. Smalley, who was also a native of 
Bowentown, born in 1805, for the most part 
followed agricultural pursuits. In 1846 he 
went to Philadelphia, where he was engaged 
as a merchant for a few years. Later he 
removed to Delaware, and there had charge of 



32 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IEW 



a mill. His wife, a daughter of Isaac Mul- 
ford, who belonged to a prominent and influ- 
ential family, had five children, namely: 
James H., a resident of Delaware; Isaac Mul- 
ford, the subject of this sketch; William F., 
alr.0 of Delaware; the Hon. John Smalley, 
who at one time was Mayor of Bridgeton; and 
Mary Budd, who died aged thirty-five years. 
The father died in February, 1853. The 
mother returned to New Jersey, and, after 
attaining the age of eighty-seven years, died 
in 1885. They were consistent members of 
Cohansey Baptist Church of Roadstown, which 
was organized two hundred years ago. 

The Hon. Isaac Mulford Smalley, after 
completing his studies in the old Bowentown 
school, began working with his father on the 
farm. He was subsequently associated with 
his father in business, and accompanied him 
in his changes of location. In the spring of 
1855, his father having previously died, hc- 
rjtunicd to Roadstown, and engaged in farm- 
ing. Being successful in that enterprise, 
about the year 1870 he undertook in addition 
to conduct a nursery, buying out an old and 
well-established firm in that business. After 
prosperously managing both enterprises until 
1892, he settled in Bridgeton, his present 
home. Although he has retired from busi- 
ness he still owns the farm, grist-mill, and 
saw-mill. Mr. Smalley has been quite active 
in politics. He was a delegate to the Na- 
tional Democratic Convention held in 186S, 
when Governor Seymour was nominated for 
President. He has been frequently a delegate 
in State conventions, and he has been a mem- 



ber of Cumberland County Democratic Com- 
mittee. For a number of years he was elected 
Freeholder on the Democratic ticket. In the 
fall of 1883 he was elected to the State legis- 
lature, and served two years, being on Com- 
mittees on Fisheries, Banking, and Insurance. 
Mr. Smalley was again elected in iSSfi, and 
served on the same committees, as well as on 
joint committees. 

On December 21, 1854, Mr. Smalley mar- 
ried Cornelia, daughter of Abraham Cannon, 
an ex-Sheriff of New Castle County, Delaware. 
They have five children, as follows: James 
H., a farmer in Roadstown, who married Miss 
Alice E., daughter of Robert Ware, and has 
three children — Minerva, Jennie, and Her- 
bert Smalley; Mary B., who married George 
B. Allen, of Christiana, Del., and has four 
children — Charles, Smalley, Maxwell, and 
Beatrice; Isaac C, of the firm of Coombs & 
Smalley, of Bridgeton; Howard Smalley, also 
of this city, who married Lizzie, daughter of 
linoch Abbot, of Roadstown, and has OTie 
child, Caroline; and Frances, who resides at 
home. Mr. Smalley 's untiring attention to 
the duties that fell to his lot fairly entitles 
him to the honorable rest and retirement he 
now enjoys. 




"ARRISON WELLS DAVIS, an ener- 
getic contractor and builder, and 
also a member of the firm Davis, 
Rainear & Davis, well-known fruit canners of 
Shiloh, was born Sejitember 24, 1840, son of 
Caleb A. and Keziah R. (Ayars) Davis. His 
grandfather was Brazillia Davis. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33 



Caleb A. Davis was born on June ii, 1815, 
in Salem County. After acquiring a common- 
school education he was apprenticed to a car- 
penter, and subsequently followed that busi- 
ness for many years. In 1857 he bought a 
farm of forty-five acres at Dixon's Corners, 
and thereafter abandoned his trade in favor of 
agricultural pursuits. He retired from active 
life in 1868. His wife, Keziah, to whom he 
was married about the year 1837, was a daugh- 
ter of Elias Ayars, of Salem County. She 
had by him eleven children, as follows: Re- 
becca, the wife of Henry Shimp, of Hopewell, 
this county; Ada A., the wife of Thomas 
Stanley; Harrison Wells, the subject of this 
skctcli ; Lucy S., now Mrs. Benjamin T. 
Willis; Elizabeth A., who died in 1846, at 
the age of two years; Mary L., the wife of 
Jonathan T. Dixon; Walter G., of whom 
there is no special record; Patience A., who 
successively married Charles Gustavus Smith 
and Richard Shepherd; ]5razillia; Daniel D. ; 
and William, Jr. The parents were members 
of the Baptist church. The father died on 
January 25, 1888. 

Harrison Wells Davis is a native of Salem 
County. He received his education in the 
commi>n schools and Union Academy of 
Shiloh. After he attained his majority he 
served an apprenticeship with a carpenter. 
Lie then engaged in farming with his brother- 
in-law for a year, subsequently working five 
years at his trade. Mr. Davis after this es- 
tablished himself in business as contractor and 
builder, and was so successful that, with the 
exception of the academy and the church, he 



has erected all of the principal buildings in 
Shiloh. When business is brisk he often finds 
it necessary to employ from five to ten men. 
He served in the Civil War as a soldier in 
Company A, Twenty-fourth Regiment, New 
Jersey Volunteer Infantry, which was with 
the Army of the Potomac. He was in the 
battle of Fredericksburg and in several 
skirmishes. Later he worked on a steamer 
chartered by the government. Since the war 
he has held different local offices. He was 
elected to the Town Committee in 1894, and 
also served on the grand jury. 

On October 19, 1867, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Lydia A., daughter of J. W. 
Marsh, of Canton, Salem County, Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis have three children — Jeremiah 
W. , Anna Frances, and Rolland M. Anna 
Frances is the wife of Winchester S. Bonham. 
The parents are members of the Seventh Day 
Baptist Church of Shiloh, in which Mr. Davis 
has been efficient as Trustee and Treasurer. 
He has also for many years been a highl}' es- 
teemed teacher of the Sunday-school. 



M 



AVID O. FRAZEUR, of the pros- 
ID J pcrous Bridgeton firm, Frazeur & 
Rice, dealers in lime and cement, 
was born January i, 1834, in Hopewell town- 
ship, Mercer County, son of Samuel D. and 
Susan (Maul) Frazeur. He is descended from 
Gershom Frazeur, the eldest of three brothers 
who were driven from Scotland on account of 
their religious belief. They came in the ship 
"Caledonia," landing at Amboy, N.J., Octo- 



34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ber 15, 1670. Major Benoni Frazeiir (for- 
merly spelled Frazee), the great-grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, born near 
Rahway, N.J., was buried in the old cemetery 
of that place. After the Revolutionary War 
he married Sarah Oliver, a daughter of a 
prominent Tory, who disowned her because of 
her marriage. During the courtship of Mr. 
Frazeur and Miss Oliver, while her lover was 
there on a visit, three Hessian soldiers ap- 
plied at the house for refreshments. Miss 
Oliver hid the Major in the outside oven. 
The soldiers stacked their arms in the yard. 
While they were partaking of the bread and 
milk she had given them, she slipped out and 
released her lover, who thereupon took posses- 
sion of the arms, made the owners his pris- 
oners, and marched them into Washington's 
camp. 

David O. Frazeur (first), the grandfather of 
the present bearer of that name, was also born 
near Rahway. He married Sarah Davis, of 
Shiloh, this county, and was a member of 
Hrearly Lodge of Bridgeton Masons. His 
son, SanuK-l D., who was born near Bridgeton 
on December 31, 1806, received a fair educa- 
tion. Being quite young when his father 
died, he went to live with his grandfather. 
There he worked on a farm during his minor- 
ity, also teaching several terms in the school 
at Beebe Run. The rest of his life was spent 
chiefly in farming. His wife, a lady of Hope- 
well township, whose maiden name was Susan 
Maul, bore him ten children, namely: David 
O. , the subject of this sketch; John M., of 
South Omaha, Neb.; F. Ward, now deceased; 



Ellen, the wife of William H. Smalley, of 
Plainfield, N.J. ; Maria M., now Mrs. J. Len- 
hart Rice; Samuel D., of Victor, Col.; Ben- 
jamin M., of Chicago, 111.; Walter G., of 
Topeka, Kan. ; Winfiekl S., of Indianapolis, 
Ind. ; and Josephine, the wife of Samuel 
Barnes, of Bridgeton. Both parents were 
Baptists. 

David O. Frazeur was educated in the com- 
mon school of his native town. When he at- 
tained his majority he began to work on a 
farm. In 1S55 he went to Farmington, 111., 
where he was engaged in farming for two 
years. Then, after spending a year in Ne- 
braska, he returned to Farmington, to which 
town his parents had removed. In 1S59, '"''s 
father's health becoming impaired, he returned 
with them to Bridgeton, and subsequently 
worked on a farm for two years. In Septem- 
ber, 1877, he and his present partner, Mr. 
Rice, bought the lime business of John B. 
Rogers, and have conducted the place since. 
They are the oldest and most important firm 
in their special line in South Jersey. Until 
1884 Mr. Frazeur was a very active Rcimbli- 
can. He has since then been a Prohibitionist, 
and some time ago was nominated for Sheriff 
on that ticket. He is a member and a Past 
Master of Brcarly Lodge of Masons, and Past 
Grand of Cumberland Lodge, No. 35, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, having con- 
nection with the Good Intent iMicampment. 

On Christmas Day, 1861, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Rebecca A., daughter of 
Joshua Bradway, of Bridgeton. They have 
two children — Samuel D. and Daniel B. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



35 



They arc members of the Central Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of which Mr. Frazeur is 
Trustee, having also served as Steward and a 
member of the Buildiu'i Committee. 



tllARLES H. BROOKS, a prominent 
builder of Deerfiekl, and a well-known 
— resident of Finley Station, was born 
July iS, 1844, in Centreton, Salem County, 
son of Uriah and Mary (Garton) Brooks. Mr. 
l^rooks's father is a native of Deerfiekl town- 
shi|); and his grandfather, Uriah lirooks 
(first), was one of the early settlers here. 

Uriah Brooks (second) was born November 
27, 1816, at a place about one mile distant 
from the present residence of his son. He 
began life as a farmer. Still in his early 
manhood he abandoned agriculture and moved 
to Camden, Camden County. After residing 
here for a time he engaged in farming again, 
and then once more relinquished it. He 
now removed to Centreton, where he started 
in a general mercantile business. Later he 
sold out, and engaged for a time in the 
butchering and produce business, shipping 
farm products to the Philadelphia market. 
After this he resumed store-keeping in Allo- 
way, Salem County. From the latter place 
he moved to Bridgcton, this county, and be- 
came a travelling salesman for a wholesale 
grocery house of Philadelphia. He continued 
upon the road until ill health caused him to 
retire. He is now residing in Bridgeton. 
Although he has met with reverses he has been 
fairly successful in life, and he retired from 



mercantile pursuits with an honorable record. 
He married Mary Garton, who was born Octo- 
ber 10, 1818, daughter of Jonathan and Mary 
(Hires) Garton. Mr. Garton was an early 
settler and a prosperous farmer of this vicin- 
ity. Mr. and Mrs. Uriah l^rooks ha\-e had 
seven children, as follows: Margaret, the wife 
of Enoch Fox; Elmer, a resident of Bridge- 
ton; Charles H., the subject of this sketch; 
Jonathan G. Brooks; Edward S., a wholesale 
grocer of Bridgeton; Preston L., also of 
Bridgeton; and Howard F., of CarlFs 
Corners. 

Charles H. Brooks was educated in the 
schools of Centreton and P'ricndship. After 
working upcn a farm for a short time he was 
apprenticed to the carpenter's trade with 
Samuel Allen, of Centreton, with whom he 
remained for one year. He finished his ap- 
prenticeship with George Bloodgood, who con- 
tinued to raise his wages as his proficiency in- 
creased. His first work as a journeyman was 
done for Charles Laning, by whom he was cm- 
jiloyed in this locality for a time, and for two 
years in Bridgeton. He next worked in Allo- 
vvay for one winter, and then went to Bridge- 
ton, where he followetl his trade with Paulin 
Conover & Co., for ten years. The financial 
panic of 1872 had such a disastrous effect 
upon trades generally that he engaged in agri- 
cultural ])ursuits. After carrying on farming 
in Bowentown for some time, he took charge 
of his grandmother Carton's property in 
Friendship, which he managed until it was 
sold. Returning to Bridgeton, he bought a 
milk route, which he ran successfully for six 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



months. The building business revived at 
this time; and, hiring an assistant to attend 
to the milk loute, he established himself as a 
contractor and builder. In the course of the 
succeeding two years he erected a number of 
houses in Bridgeton, employing several men, 
and sold his milk route, and settled upon his 
present farm. lie owns sixty acres of well- 
located land, which he cultivates successfully. 
Among the improvements he has made is the 
erection of a new barn and a new carriage- 
house. Besides attending to his farm he has 
also done some carpenter work here. He has 
considerable capital invested in real estate. 
He is generally regartletl as one of the well- 
to-do and successful residents of Deerficld. 
Me built and formerly owned the double house 
which his father bought and now occupies in 
Bridgeton. He owns a double house on Fre- 
mont Avenue and a half-interest in a paying 
tenement house on East Avenue, both of 
which he built. It is his purpose to build 
a house on his farm next year. 

In December, i86g, Mr. Brooks . married 
ilaiuiah B. I'"inley, daughter of David Finley, 
a liighly esteemed resident and very successful 
farmer of ]3cerficKl. David i'"inley moved 
from Dcdaware to the vicinity of this town- 
ship, and bought the old Deerficld parsonage, 
which was his home for the rest of his life. 
Me reared five other children; namely, Sarah, 
William, David, Archibald, and Edward. 
Mr. and Mrs. Brooks have hafl five ciiildren, 
of whom Sarah and Leon are living. The 
others were: Lizzie, who died at the age of 
eleven; Uriah, wlio died at the age of four; 



and Susie, who died at the age of two years. 
Though not an aspirant to public honors, Mr. 
Brooks renders active support to the Demo- 
cratic party. In 1895 he was elected a Justice 
of the Peace for four years. He takes a deep 
interest in social and religious matters; and 
he, his wife, and daughter are members of 
the Second Presbyterian Church of Bridgeton. 




HARLES LANING, a retired con- 
tractor and builder and one of the 
oldest residents of Bridgeton, was 
born here, April 21, 1824, son of William and 
Ann (Peterson) Laning. Mr. Laning is a de- 
scendant of David Laning, who was probably 
born in this State in 1705. Samuel Laning, 
Mr. Laning's great-grandfather, was born in 
Moorestown, Burlington County, in 1740, and 
resided there until his death, which occurred 
in 1822, at an advanced age. He was a mem- 
jjcr of the Society of Friends. James Laning, 
Mr. Laning's grandfather, was born in 
Moorestown in 1770. He remained in liis 
native place until after his marriage, wiien he 
moved to Philadelphia, where he resided for 
some years. He subsequently came with his 
family to Bridgeton, and resided there until 
his death, in the fall of 1820. 

William Laning, who was born in Philadel- 
phia, February 27, 1797, spent his youth in 
the Quaker City, where he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade. In 1816 he came to Bridgeton, 
and here worked at his trade for a number of 
years. He finally relinquished carpentering, 
and purchased a small farm in the township of 




CHARLES P. LORD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFAIFA\' 



39 



Deerfickl, where he passed the last twenty-five 
years of his life, and died April i, i86g. He 
was prominent in public affairs during the ac- 
tive period of his life, and rendered efficient 
service to the town as Assessor, Collector, 
and a Freehnltlcr. Mis wife, whom he mar- 
ried June 2 1, 1S21, was born in Maurice 
River township, this county, October 3, 1794, 
daui^hter of ]5enoni Peterson, a lifelong resi- 
dent of Maurice River, who died in early man- 
hood. She was descended from Colonial an- 
cestors; and her grandfather, who served in 
the Continental army during the Revolution- 
ary War, jiassed his last years in Maurice 
River township. Her children were: Jane, 
who died in infancy; Charles, the subject of 
this sketch; Jane Laning (second); John P., 
who occupies the old homestead in Deerfield; 
William, who is a prominent fruit packer of 
this locality; Louisa, who died in 1892; 
Ann, tlie wife of David Veal, of Hopewell, 
this county; and P'rancis, who died in in- 
fancy. The mother died in August, 1870. 

Charles Paning acquired his education in 
the schools of Bridgeton. lie then learned 
the carpenter's trade, and followed it there- 
after continuously for over fifty years. P^or 
the greater part of that time he worked at it as 
a contractor and builder, making a specialty of 
house building. Many of the jirescnt resi- 
dences of Bridgeton and Deerfield were erected 
by him. There is probably not a single 
builder in this section of the county who has 
been so long and so successfully identified 
with the building interest. During his active 
period he employed a large number of men. 



He invested to a considerable extent in land, 
upon which he erected buildings; and he owns 
much valuable property at the present time. 
Retiring from active business pursuits in 
1889 in favor of his son, he erectetl upon his 
premises a small store, in which he carries on 
a grocery business, more for occupation than 
profit. In piditics he has always su|)ported 
the Democratic party, which elected him a 
Freeholder, Assessor, Councilman from the 
First Ward, and a delegate to several State 
conventions. 

On January 10, 1850, Mr. Laning wedded 
Hope Allen, who was born in Salem County, 
March 28, 1828, daughter of the late Samuel 
Allen, a well-known farmer and carpenter of 
his day. Mr. and Mrs. Laning have had nine 
children, namely: ICmma V. Laning; Samuel 
A., Post-master of this city; Jennie, the wife 
of Isaac Laning, of Richmond, Ind. ; C. How- 
ard, who, after succeeding to his father's busi- 
ness, has engaged in mining at Cripple Creek, 
Col. ; Martha, who is vice-principal of the 
Bank Street School; William PI.; P'rancis; 
Nan, the wife of Henry Love, of Park City, 
Utah; and Elizabeth, first assistant at the 
Pearl Street School. The father is Past 
Grand of Cumberland Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and a member of the 
encami)mcnt. 



(0' 




APTAIN CHARLES PHINEAS 



r LORD, Mayor of A'ineland, N.J., 
was born in the town of North Ber- 
wick, Me., October 14, 1831. Plis earliest 
American ancestor was Nathan Lord, who set- 



40 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tied in South Berwick, Me., in 1632. Thus 
it happens that the family has for more than 
two and a half centuries been associated with 
the local history and tradition of the old town. 

Humi^hrey Lord, the grandfather of Charles 
V. Lord, lived at Old Fields, South Berwick; 
and it seems a singular fact that the genera- 
tions of this family remained for so long a 
period in the same region of country. Here 
Jeremiah Lord, the father of Vineland's 
Mayor, was born also. He was a general mer- 
chant in North Berwick up to the time of his 
death, which occurred in icS62. Though an 
ardent Whig, and a stanch Republican after 
the formation of the latter party, he was never 
an aspirant for any office in his town or county. 

Jeremiah Lord married Miss Mary Ann 
Varney, of Rochester, N. H., the daughter of 
Mr. I'hineas Varney, the representative of a 
lirominent New ICngland famil)-. Mrs. Lord, 
wiio was born in 1S09, and has witnessed many 
changes in her long life, still survives her 
husband. Charles Phineas was the eldest- 
born of her nine children. The eight brothers 
and sisters were respectively: Albert J., of 
Charlestown, Mass.; Henry W., who died; 
Sarah J., who lives at the old home; Sophia, 
who (lied of small-pox, contracted during the 
war by coming in contact with some "Rebel " 
clothing sent into Boston, presumably with 
the oiiject of spreading the horrible disease; 
an infant who died without a name; Mary 
Ann, who died; Jeremiah K. and John R., 
both residents of North Berwick. The par- 
ents were both in church fellowship, the 
mother being a Congregationalist, while the 



father was a Universalist. Mr. Jeremiah 
Lord was a cousin of Miss Sarah Orne Jewett, 
the popular writer whose stories of New Eng- 
land life have made the old town of South ■ 
Berwick and the surrounding country so full 
of interest to her readers. 

Charles P. Lord was educated in the gram- 
mar school of North Berwick and at Lowell, 
Mass. Directly after his graduation from the 
North Berwick High School he became a 
clerk in a store, where he remained until 
eighteen years of age. Going then to Lowell, 
Mass., he served an apprenticeshi]:> of three 
toilsome years in acquiring proficiency in the 
machinist's trade. This calling he followed 
until the breaking out of the Civil War, when 
he enlisted in a company of the Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry known as the Lowell Me- 
chanics" Phalanx. He had joined the Pha- 
lanx, which was a State militia organization, 
in his youth, and had served his full term, 
receiving honorable discharge from dut)'. 
Part of the time while thus engaged he 
served as Sergeant and company clerk. At 
the time of President Lincoln's inauguration, 
when portentous war clouds hung over the po- 
litical heavens. Sergeant Lord rejoined his 
company, and wisely, too; for the Mechanics' 
Phalanx was destined to take a prominent part 
in the national struggle soon to follow. 

Foreseeing the needs of the situation, 
Charles P. Lord made a motion that very even- 
ing to tender the services of the Phalanx to 
the government. As the result of this action 
a meeting of the officers of the Sixth Regi- 
ment was held January 21, 1861, and an offer 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



41 



of the regiment made to the commander-in- 
chief of the State. This resolution was car- 
ried to Boston by General Butler, who was at 
that time a member of the Massachusetts State 
Senate. The legislature of Massachusetts now 
tendered the services of the State troops to 
the government; and active life began for the 
men, who were soon to be soldiers in good 
earnest, although even before Lincoln's inau- 
guration the company had been drilling. Sen- 
ator Wilson, of Massachusetts, was in Wash- 
ington when the first call for troops was made, 
on the 15th of April, 1861. About four 
hours previous to the issue of the proclama- 
tion President Lincoln had requested Mr. 
Wilson to have four regiments of Massachu- 
setts militia sent to Washington on duty. 

The Sixth was now ordered to muster on 
Boston Common preparatory to marshalling 
their ranks for a march to the national capi- 
tal. The men of the Phalan.x had very soon 
after an actual experience of warfare, for they 
had to fight their way through ]?altimore in 
the memorable secession riot of April 19, 
1 86 1. The Si.xth was mustered with the 
United States service, and was quartered in 
the Senate Chamber for about ten days, after 
which they were ordered from Washington to 
the Relay House. After doing duty in this 
vicinity for about three months, Sergeant Lord 
returned to Massachusetts, and in the August 
of 1861 enlisted in Company F, the Eighth 
Maine. As First Sergeant he went to Wash- 
ington and Annapolis, and was a participant 
in the battles of Port Royal, Jacksonville, 
Fla., the siege of Charleston, and the capture 



of Pulaski. It was while at Port Royal with 
Sherman that he was promoted to the second 
and first lieutenancy, the last office carrying 
with it the acting capacity of a captaincy, as 
his papers read "P^irst Lieutenant Command- 
ing Company." While participating in en- 
gagements mentioned above. Captain Lord 
was also doing guard and provost duty until 
he joined the Army of the Potomac under 
General Grant. 

Captain Lord's health began to fail under 
the strain of army life; and, after being de- 
tailed with forty men to cut a way through the 
malarial Southern swamps, he became physi- 
cally disabled, and was discharged from active 
service. The three weeks' work in the 
swampy lowlands was accomplished at a great 
cost. Only six men out of the forty who had 
made the party survived. On the 22d of 
February, 1866, Captain Lord came to Vine- 
land, where he purchased a farm; but he was 
too shattered in health to bear the strain of 
such exertions as a successful farmer must en- 
dure, and was compelled to give it up. l""or 
a number of years he was head clerk in the 
grocery store of Brown & Lorin; but even that 
occupation proved too much for his enfeebled 
constitution, and he resigned the position. 
F'inding himself in a measure recuperated 
after a complete rest, he entered the arena of 
public life, and in 1877 was elected Mayor of 
Vineland. He filled the office seven one-year 
terms, and in 1895 was re-elected for a term 
of three years. During his administration as 
Mayor the town of Vineland has been provided 
with wide sidewalks, which would be credit- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



able to any city, and which display both taste 
and judgment on the part of the executive 
force. 

In 1891 Captain Lord was also elected a 
Justice of the Peace, and he does a great deal 
of business in that court. He is also by 
government appointed the Commissioner of 
Deeds and a Notary Public. In jjolitics Cap- 
tain Lord has been a stanch Republican since 
the foundation of that party, serving on com- 
mittees and always voting the Republican 
ticket. He was the first Post Commander of 
Lyon Post, No. 10, Grand Army of the Re- 
luiblic, and one of the charter members of the 
organization. The year following his com- 
mand he was Officer of the Day, and he was 
subsequently Chaplain of the post for eighteen 
years. He is now Past Grand of Hobart 
Lodge, No. 122, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and an active member of Vineland 
Lodge, No. 69, A. F. & A. M. 

Captain Loril married Miss Martha L. 
I-'ield, a native of Lowell, Mass. Mrs. Lord 
died October 12, 18S3, leaving no children. 
A Univcrsalist in faith, C'aiitain Lord is con- 
nected by membership with the Unitarian 
church ill Vineland. Both as a citizen and 
soldier he has deservedly won the apprecia- 
tion and recognition of services which his 
State and country have accorded him. 




,\CA^/1LLIAM HFNRY VAN LEER, a 
dealer in general merchandise and 
agricultural implements of Deerfield Street, 
was born January 12, 185 1, at a place about a 



mile and a half north of the village. He is a 
son of Michael and Anna (Mowers) Van Leer, 
and is of German descent by both parents. 
His grandfather, Samuel Van Leer, who was 
born near Carpenter's Landing, this State, 
was a man of much energy and quiet force of 
character. Samuel was bound out when a 
boy, and struggled with poverty many years. 
When he died he left an estate worth fifty-two 
thousand dollars. He resided for a number of 
years in Salem County, and then moved to 
Deerfield, where he had three farms. The 
last twenty years of his life were spent in 
Bridgeton, retired from active work. He 
served in the Revolutionary army. 

Michael Van Leer was born in Salem 
County, between Yorktovvn and the town of 
Alloway, December 12, 1822 or 1823. At 
the time of his marriage, when he was twenty- 
five years of age, he i)urchased a farm of 
eighty-one acres in Deerfield, on which he 
afterward made many improvements, including 
the erection of a number of good buildings. 
The house, which was built at this time, is 
one of the best brick farm-houses in the two 
counties. Mr. Van Leer was interested in 
ship-buihling for three years, and with that 
exception his active life has been devoted to 
the pursuit of agriculture. A man of unas- 
suming disposition, he is still one of the 
strong men of the place, and has been a Free- 
holder for a numljcrof years. lie is active in 
local politics as a Democrat. On January 19, 
1850, he was married to Anna, daughter of 
William and Mary Ann (Naylor) Mowers. 
Her grandfather, John Mowers, a New Jersey 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



43 



farmer, was of German descent. Her father, 
William Mowers, was born on the Mowers 
homestead, about a half-mile from Alloway 
Station, and there practically spent his life, 
engaged in general farming. He owned three 
hundred acres of land, was one of the influen- 
tial men of his day, was elected by his towns- 
men to several important offices; and in his 
young manhood he served as a soldier in the 
War of 1 812. His wife, a daughter of James 
Naylor, of Philadelphia, was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and attended 
worship there. They had eight children, of 
whom two, besides Anna, attained maturity. 
These were: Absalom, a lifelong resident of 
Alloway, who died in April, 1893, aged sixty- 
three; and Ellen, born in 1835, the wife of 
George Watson, of JJushtown, Salem County. 
Anna (Mowers) Van Leer was born on the 
family homestead, February 27, 1830. She, 
too, is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Her children are: William Henry, 
the subject of this sketch; Beulali, the wife of 
William Finlay, of DeerfieKl ; I'^lla, living 
with her parents; Charles, a resident of Deer- 
field Street; and Kate, also at home. 

William Henry Van Leer received his early 
education in public and private schools of 
Deerfield Street, and afterward stuilied for a 
year in the South Jersey Institute in Bridge- 
ton. He was engaged in logging with his 
father for three years, their work being so ex- 
tensive that they employed three and four 
teams part of the time. Then, for three years, 
he was in business as a stock trader, with 
headquarters at Deerfield Street, and market 



at New York. On March 25, 1880, he formed 
with John H. Avis a partnership, which lasted 
about a year. In November, 1882, he erected 
the largest and finest store building in the 
town, stockeil it with general merchandise, 
and opened it for business. This he has suc- 
cessfully conducted since. Some time ago he 
added agricultural implements and macliinery 
to his stock in trade, and he now also deals 
in coal. His patronage is very large, and in 
the season he keeps two travelling agents 
busy. He owns a small farm; and in Deer- 
field, on the road to Cohansey, he has one of 
the prettiest homes in the township. 

On December 27, 1876, Mr. Van Leer was 
married to Kate A., daughter of George Han- 
non, formerly of Deerfield, now of liridgeton. 
Three children were born to him, two of whom 
died in infancy. The other, a daughter named 
Leonora, is living with her parents. Mr. Van 
Leer is a Democrat, and has been a delegate 
in all the conventions held by his party for 
the past fifteen years. lie was Town Clerk 
for three years, and he lias been elected Col- 
lector since 1S88. He is a member of Vic- 
tory Lodge, Knights of Tythias, No. 137, of 
Rosenhayn. He is also prominent in cliurch 
work, and has served on the official board of 
the Methodist I'.piscopal church. Mrs. Van 
Leer, too, is a mendier of this cliurch. 



—«-•♦•-♦— 



ANlia. MARKS, D.D.S., a thriv- 
ing dentist of Bridgeton, was born 
July 5, 1 86 1, in Cape Vincent, 
Jefferson County, N.Y., son of I'liilip and 



M 



44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Catherine (Kirchner) Marks. The paternal 
and maternal ancestors were German. Philip 
Marks was a native of Frankfort, Germany, 
and came when a young man to Syracuse, 
Onondaga County, N.Y. , where he continued 
to work at his trade of mason and stone cutter, 
for which he had been trained in the old coun- 
try. A few years later he moved to Cape 
Vincent, and there carried on an extensive 
business as contractor, besides dealing in coal, 
lime, and lumber. Yet he was not wholly ab- 
sorbed in his own affairs, as he served the town 
in the capacity of President of the Village 
Board. Mr. Marks afterward moved to Evans's 
Mills, Jefferson County, N.Y., where he still 
resides. He is a Royal Arch Mason, while 
in politics he is a Republican. He was twice 
married. By his first marriage he became the 
father of two children. His second wife, 
a lady of Ca|>e Vincent, whose maiden name 
was Miss Kirchner, had one son, Daniel, the 
subject of this article. 

Daniel Marks received his early education 
at Cape Vincent. His father taught him tiie 
mason's tiadi.', which lie followetl for some 
time in his native town. In 188.S he went to 
Philadelphia, and entered the Dental College, 
from which he graduated in 1890. 1 le had car- 
ried on a large and successful practice in Cedar- 
ville, this county, for some years, when he con- 
cluded to move to this city, where lie has built 
up a first-class practice. Mr. Marks is a mem- 
ber of Salome Lodge, No. 145, A. 1-". & A. M., 
of Cedarville; Cumberland Council, No. 109, 
Junior O. U. A. M. ; and of Knights of Pyth- 
ias, Tidal Wave Lodge of Cedarville. 



On February i, 1888, Mr. Marks was united 
in marriage to Miss Lilian Jeanette, the 
daughter of George S. Walker, of Watertown, 
Jefferson County, N.Y. Mr. and Mrs. Marks 
are members of the Central Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. They have a pleasant home at 
168 Hampton Street. 



Tfr)MTHERFORCE B. ELMER, a gen- 
Y^V^ eral farmer and stock raiser of Fair- 
ton, in the town of P'airfield, was born here, 
July 16, 1864, son of James E. and Lydia 
(Swing) Elmer. His spent his early years 
on his father's farm, receiving his education 
in the public schools of F"airton. When the 
time came for him to decide as to what occu- 
pation he would pursue, he selected farming. 
The choice has since been amply justified by 
his successful pursuit of that calling. 

Mr. Elmer has been twice married. His 
first union was contracted with Miss Carrie C. 
Trenschard, a daughter of Rufus Trenschard, 
who carries on a milling business in Fairton. 
.She died on b'ebruary 20, 1889, leaving no 
children. Mr. IClmer's second marriage was 
performed August 4, 1890, when he was 
united to Miss Emma Jane Ackley, a native 
of Millville, N.J., born May 20, 1869. When 
but two years old she removed with her jxir- 
ents to Vineland, this county, where they still 
reside. Her father, William Ackley, was 
iiorn in Salem County. Although now in his 
eighty-fifth year he is still actively engaged 
in general farming. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
have a son and daughter — Carrie and Ben- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



45 



jaiiiin. Mr. Elmer votes the Democratic 
ticket, while he is not an aspirant to official 
honors. He is a member of Cumberland 
Lodge, No. 35, Independent Order of Odd 
F"ello\vs, and is a communicant of the Pres- 
byterian church here at Fairton. 




^ 'TACY W. MATTHEWS, of Bridge- 
ton, the foreman of the blacksmith 
shop at the Cohansey Glass Com- 
pany's works, was born on a farm near Med- 
ford, Burlington County, January 21, 1S24, 
son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Bearford) 
Matthews. His paternal grandfather, Jere- 
miah Matthews, came to this country from 
Scotland, and located in Burlington County, 
where the remaining years of his life were 
passed. John Bearford, his maternal grand- 
father, who was born in England, likewise 
came to this country and settled in Burling- 
ton County. Lewis Matthews and Elizabeth 
Bearford were born near each other, the for- 
mer on August 2, 1789, and the latter on De- 
cember 26, 1794, and grew to maturity in 
the same neighborhood. Lewis Matthews 
followed farming in his younger days, after- 
ward removing to Millville, this county, 
where he was employed as a glass worker. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. His death occurred on January 16, 
1857, and that of his wife on August 18, 
1856. Five children survived them; namely, 
Sarah, Elizabeth, Stacy W., Lewis, and 
Tillie. Sarah is the widow of the late Mr. 
Moore; Elizabeth is the wife of John Camp- 



bell; and Tillie is the wife of Joseph 
Congdon. With the exception of Stacy W. 
they all reside at Millville. 

Stacy W. Matthews, who was ten years of 
age at the time his parents moved to Mill- 
ville, received the greater part of his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that town. He 
then served a five years' apprenticeship at the 
blacksmith trade, after which he went into 
business for himself at Dividing Creek, this 
county. A short time after he came to 
Bridgeton, and set up a shop in South Pearl 
Street. Here his best customer for several 
years was the Cohansey Glass Company. At 
length the company purchased the shop for 
exclusive use, and placed him in charge as 
foreman. This position he has held for thirty- 
nine years, and has now five men under his 
orders. 

Mr. Matthews has been twice married. The 
first marriage was contracted with Miss 
Permelia Robbins, a daughter of Ricksoii 
Robbins, of Port Norris, N.J. She died 
April 19, 1890, leaving a son and two daugh- 
ters. These were: Rebecca, now the wife of 
John Boon, of Bridgeton, and the mother of 
two children; William H., a ]jrosperous coal 
merchant of Germantown, Pa. ; and Mary, the 
wife of Edward Reeves, of Port Norris. On 
November 5, 1893, Mr. Matthews was married 
to his [iresent wife, Mary (McKee) Matthews, 
a daughter of John McKcc, of .Salem City, 
Salem County. In politics Mr. Matthews has 
been a Republican since 1856, has served on 
the County Executive Committee of the party 
and as a delegate to various conventions. In 



46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1870 he was elected a member of the Common 
Council from Ward 2, serving one term. 
Following that he was chosen as Freeholder 
for one term, served three years on the Board 
of Education, five years as Justice of the 
Peace, and, after filling several other offices, 
declined further nomination until the spring 
of 1890, when he was again elected to the 
Common Council. At the present time he is 
serving his third term of three years in that 
body. He has been a member of its impor- 
tant committees, such as Fire, Light, and 
Finance, and has been its President for two 
years. He is a member of Cumberland 
Lodge, No. 35, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he is I-'ast Grand, and is the 
only man in the city who has been through 
the chairs twice. He is also a member of the 
State encampment, and has served as Repre- 
sentative to the Grand Lodge. Mr. Matthews 
and his family attend and sujjport the Fourth 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He has re- 
cently erected a fine double house on Pine 
Street, on which street he has lived for thirty- 
seven years. A man of sterling worth, he is 
respected by all who know him. 



(JOSHUA CLARK ACKLEY, a con- 
tractor and builder of Bridgeton, was 
born October 14, 1836, near Willow 
Grove, Salem County, son of Samuel and 
Lydia (Clark) Ackley. Uriah Ackley, a 
farmer, who was a resident of Salem County 
nearly all his life, was the grandfather of 
Joshua. Samuel Ackley, a native of Cumber- 



land County, born I^ebruary 5, iSiO, received 
his education in the schools of his native 
town. He remained at home upon the farm 
during his minority. Shortly after reaching 
his majority he bought a farm, and success- 
fully managed it until 1867. Then he re- 
moved to Bridgeton, where he spent the rest of 
his life retired from active business. While a 
resident of Salem he was elected Overseer of 
the Roads, and served many years in that ca- 
pacity. Later he filled a similar position in 
Bridgeton for several terms, and was Common 
Councilman there for one year. At one time 
he was a member of the Sons of Temperance. 
When the Reading Railroad was extended to 
Bridgeton he did a large amount of contract 
work for that company, especially in grading 
for the new station. On October 24, 1834, he 
was married to Lydia Clark, daughter of Isaac 
Clark, of Salem County. They had seven 
children, of whom Joshua C, Joseph, Re- 
becca, Charles, and John attained maturity. 
Rebecca became the wife of Isaac Potter, of 
Camden, N.J. All are members of the Meth- 
odist church, in which their father officiated 
as class leader and Steward for many years. 
He died on February 28, 1S90, and the 
mother on July 31, 1875. ^li's. Joshua C. 
Ackley's father, Abram Simmerman, passed 
away on the same day. 

Joshua C. Ackley was educated in the dis- 
trict school in the place now known as Union 
Grove, Salem County. He then learned the 
carpenter's trade, and thereafter worked at it 
as a journeyman for several years. He came 
to ]5ridgeton in 1864, and there in 1S75 es- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



tablished himself as a contractor and Iniilder. 
A great many fine residences in Bridgeton 
and vicinity are excellent samples of his 
great taste and skill. Mr. Ackley has a 
mill where he manufactures all the finish he 
uses. He is a charter member of Mxcelsior 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and was formerly 
connected with Lodge No. 13, K. of G. E. 

On December 24, 1863, Mr. Ackley was 
married to Harriet Simmerman, daughter of 
Abram Simmerman, of Glassboro, Glouces- 
ter County. She has borne him seven chil- 
dren, namely: Lydia, now Mrs. George Ben- 
nett, of Camden; Alonzo and Ulysses R. ; 
Harriet, the wife of Harry Wilson, of Bridge- 
ton; Melvin; Edgar; and Kelso. The fam- 
ily, who are members of the Methodist 
church, reside in a pleasant home built by 
Mr. Ackley in 1870. 



|NOCH H. RILEY, a farmer and stock 
raiser of Deerfield, was born on the 
farm where he resides, July 29, 1826, son of 
Elijah D. and Maria (Heritage) Riley. 
Daniel Riley, Sr., the great-grandfather of 
Enoch H., came to this country from Ireland. 
His son, Daniel, Jr., who was born at Bridge- 
ton, on reaching maturity engaged in farming, 
and became the father of ten children. 

Elijah 1). Riley was born in the part of 
Bridgeton formerly called Indian Fields. 
When about six years old he was brought here 
by Elijah Davis, the benevolent man who 
reared him and subsequently bequeathed him 
his property. On February g, 1809, Elijah 



was married to Miss Maria Heritage, who was 
born in Deerfield in 1789, daughter of Firman 
and Esther (Stratton) Heritage. Her parents 
were Scotch people who came to the .States in 
their younger days. She bore her husband 
seven children, of whom three lived to matu- 
rity. These were: Anna M., the wife of Jere- 
miah Parvin and the mother of E. R. Parvin; 
Elijah, now deceased; and Enoch H., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. The mother died January 
12, 1852. Both parents were members of the 
old Deerfield Presbyterian church, of which 
the father was an l^lder for over forty years. 
He joined the church when twenty-two years 
of age, and from that time until his death he 
was one of its most active workers. In poli- 
tics he was- an ardent Whig. For thirty-five 
years he served as Justice of the Peace. He 
also acted in the capacity of Lay Judge of 
Cumberland County. 

Enoch H. Riley was educated in the public 
schools of Deerfield. He remained on the 
farm; and, succeeding to it at his father's 
death, he has carried it on since that time. 
On June 17, 1847, he was joined in marriage 
with Miss Mary E. Carnes, of Bridgeton. 
She was born F"ebruary 24, 1830, daughter of 
Enoch and Sarah (Dare) Carnes. Enoch 
Carnes, who was a native of Bridgeton, died 
at an early age, when his daughter was but two 
years old. His wife, Sarah, was a grand- 
daughter of one Riley, a descendant of the 
same branch as Enoch H. Mr. and Mrs. 
Riley have nine children living, namely: 
Arabella, the wife of Edgar Hitchner, who 
is the principal of the city schools; Mary, the 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wife of Henry N. Hitchner, of Dcerfield; 
Ruth, who lives at home; Elijah D., the prin- 
cipal of the public school at May's Landing, 
Atlantic County; John N., living in Harrison- 
ville, N.J. ; Charles Lincoln, with the New 
York Life Insurance Company at St. Joseph, 
Mo. ; Enoch H., Jr., of Kansas City, Mo., 
where he conducts an insurance business; 
Frank L., engaged in the grocery business in 
Philadelphia; and Howard C, who lives at 
home. William B. died when twelve years 
of age, and two children died in infancy. 

Mr. Riley has always voted the straight Re- 
publican ticket, but has never mingled to any 
extent in political affairs. Since 1846 he has 
been a member of the old Presbyterian church 
of Deerfield Street. Mrs. Riley is also a 
member. He is also a Trustee of the church, 
and for a number of years has served as super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. 



M 



AVID SEELEY BLEW, a member 
of the Common Council of Bridge- 
ton and a successful meat dealer, 
was born here, July 29, 1856, son of Joseph 
and Mary (Seeley) Blew. Joseph ]?lew, a na- 
tive of Cumberland County, was reared to 
farm life, while he received but three months' 
schooling. In his boyhood he performed the 
work of a man, such as driving a wood team. 
He remained at home until he was of age, 
after which he worked by the month or season 
on different farms. At his father's death he 
inherited the old homestead in Bridgeton, and 
carried it on successfully up to 1890. He 



then sold the pro])erty, and has since been a 
resident of Bridgeton. In politics he is a 
firm Republican. For eleven years he has 
served as Overseer of Roads in Ward 4. His 
wife, who is a daughter of Captain David 
Seeley, of Bridgeton, has made him the father 
of seven children; namely, Sarah, Robert M., 
David Seeley, William R., Martha S., Ella 
.S., and Charles S. Sarah is the wife of Al- 
bert Mi.\ner, of Hopewell, N.J.; and Martha 
S. is the wife of John Price, of Philadelphia. 
Robert M., William R., and Charles S. are 
residents of Bridgeton. Both parents attend 
and support the Commerce Street Methodist 
P]piscopal Church, of which the mother has 
been a member since her girlhood. 

David Seeley Blew received his education 
in the public schools of Bridgeton and at West 
Jersey Academy. On leaving school he con- 
tinued to reside at home, assisting his father 
with the farm work throughout the remainder 
of his minority. During the first year after 
he became of age he was engaged in gardening 
on shares. He then went to Fredericksburg, 
where he was employed one season as purchas- 
ing agent for Joseph A. Clark & Son. After 
this he returned to Bridgeton to take charge of 
a store belonging to Mr. Clark. A little over 
three years later, in company with his brother 
Robert, he purchased the business, and car- 
ried it on successfully for two years under the 
firm name of D. S. & R. M. Blew. After a 
year of rest, on August 5, 1883, he was ap- 
pointed postal clerk in tlie railway mail ser- 
vice between Philadelphia and Bridgeton. 
He had held that position for five years when 




JOSEPH A. CLARK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



5' 



he was removed by a new administration at 
Washington. He then purcliased a marlcet in 
Camden, whither he had removed on receiving 
his appointment as mail clerk, and did a pros- 
perous business in this line for some years. 
After President Harrison's election he was 
reinstated in the mail service, being this time 
assigned to the New York and Pittsburg 
route. Subsequently he served for two years 
on the route between Philadelphia and Harris- 
burg. In 1890 he resigned his position and 
settled in Bridgeton, to which place he had 
previously removed his family. Here he was 
employed for four years as Assistant Post- 
master. I'ollowing that he secured a position 
with the Merchants' Retail Corn Agency of 
Philadelphia, and continued with them up to 
October 13, 1894. At that time he opened 
the market in Bridgeton, in which he is now 
doing a successful business. 

On January 22, 1878, Mr. Blew was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Clark, a daughter 
of Isaac Clark, of Parvin's Mills. Two sons 
have blessed the union; namely, J. Oscar and 
Robert S. 

Mr. Blew has always been a Republican in 
politics. In 1S95 he was elected a member of 
the Common Council for three years from 
Ward 4, receiving the largest majority ever 
given a candidate for this office in this ward. 
He is a member of the P'ire Committee, of 
which he is Chairman, also of the I'inance 
Committee; and he is one of the leaders in 
the movement for better street paving. He is 
a member of Bridgeton Castle, Knights of 
Golden Eagle, and a charter member and one 



of the Executive Committee of the Bridgeton 
Musical Union. He and Mrs. Blew are prom- 
inent members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Bridgeton. He was a Trustee of 
the church, superintendent of its Sunday- 
school, Steward, and class leader; and he now 
serves it in the capacity of chorister. 



OSEPH ARCHIBALD CLARK, 

founder of the Clark Glass Works, one 
of the most important manufacturing 
industries in the city of Bridgeton, N.J., was 
born at Centreton, Salem County, this State, 
on July 12, 1822, son of Isaac and Rebecca 
(Newkirk) Clark. 

Isaac Clark, who was also a native of Centre- 
ton, spent the greater part of his life in tilling 
the soil and in other agricultural pursuits, and 
was considered one of the most practical and 
enterprising farmers of Centreton. For a 
number of years he served as Overseer of 
Roads in that town, a position in which he 
proved himself efficient and trustworthy. Of 
the children born of his union with Miss Re- 
becca Newkirk two arc living — Sarah, the 
wife of Charles Smith; and Joseph A. Isaac 
Clark and his wife were consistent members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Centre- 
ton, in which he held various offices, among 
them that of class leader. 

Their son, Joseph Archibald, received a 
good, practical education ; and when his school- 
days were ended, as his father had then retired 
from active labor, he carried on the homestead 
farm until he was twenty-two years of age. 



52 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He then purchased a farm of seventy-five acres 
in Salem County, and there his father's de- 
clining years were passed. In addition to 
that place Mr. Clark owned a large amount of 
other land, and was long engaged in getting 
out hoop poles for the city market, having 
probably manufactured as many as any man in 
this State. 

After having successfully engaged in farm- 
ing for twenty-one years, in 1867 Mr. Clark 
sold his farm, and came to Bridgeton to reside. 
During the first seven years he continued in 
the hoop pole business, to which he added that 
of lumber, his office being on Laurel Street; 
but in 1874 he sold out his interests, and in 
company with Mr. Bassett and Mr. Shoemaker 
started in the manufacture of glass. For two 
years they were on Water Street; but at the 
end of that time their business had increased 
so that larger quarters were necessary, and 
they removed to their present stand, where they 
have continued to do a very successful busi- 
ness under the style of the Cumberland Glass 
Manufacturing Company, making a specialty 
of bottles of various kinds. The Window 
Glass Company has since Iseen formed, of 
which Mr. Clark is also a partner; and, al- 
though it is the latest company of this descrip- 
tion that has been organized in Bridgeton, it 
gives employment to a larger number of people 
than any other here. 

In March, 1848, Mr. Clark was joined in 
marriage with Miss Mary Loi)er, of Cumber- 
land County. Two of their children are liv- 
ing, namely: Rebecca, the wife of C. W. 
Shoemaker; and Josephine R., who is at the 



parental home. Their son, Isaac L., who 
lived to be but thirty-four years of age, was 
associated with his father in the hoop pole and 
lumber business, and was afterward one of 
the leaders in the organization and establish- 
ment of the glass business. He was a young 
man of promising business ability and an 
exemplary member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark and their daughters arc 
influential members of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. On coming to Bridgeton, Mr. 
Clark purchased a house at 236 North Laurel 
Street, where he and his family still reside, 
he having rebuilt the house and made vari- 
ous other substantial improvements. He also 
owns several other dwelling-houses in this 
city. 



WILLIS AUGUST 
prominent and es 



AUGUSTUS STITES, a 
!steenied resident of 
Newport, engaged in the oyster business at 
Bivalve, this county, was born here, July 5, 
1848, son of Captain Edmund and Sarah (Brad- 
ford) Stites. His father, also a native of New- 
port, born January 14, 1823, hat! but meagre 
opportunities for acquiring an education. 
When he was about twelve years of age he ac- 
cepted employment on a wood shallop. Subse- 
quently, while still quite young, he was ap- 
pointed to the captaincy of a boat. Directing 
his attention subsequently to oystering, he 
continued to engage in that industry until 
about 1868. In this year he abandoned sea- 
faring, and engaged in the business of ship- 
ping oysters at Bivalve, still, however, retain- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



S3 



ing his interest in his boat. Mr. Stites was 
one of the first men to embark in oyster ship- 
ping at Bivalve, and his enterprise has been 
rewarded by a very e.xtensive and prosperous 
business. In 1870 he received his son Ed- 
mund into partnership, forming the firm of E. 
Stites & Son. The firm now own and employ 
quite a number of oyster boats. On May 9, 
1847, Captain Stites was united in marriage 
with Miss Sarah Bradford, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry Bradford, of Newport. They 
have since become the parents of ten children; 
namely, Willis Augustus, Sally, Edmund, 
Howard, Addie, Harry, Anna, Ellsmore, 
Ella, and Walter. Sally is now the wife of 
Thomas Carson, of Millville, this county; 
Anna is the wife of William Burges, and re- 
sides at Ocean City, N.J. ; and Ella is now 
Mrs. Samuel Hugh, of Philadelphia. Cap- 
tain Stites belongs to the Union Benefit So- 
ciety of Newport, and to Friends Lodge of 
Odd Fellows, located at Cedarville, N.J. He 
has never participated very actively in local 
politics. The Baptist Church of Newport, of 
wiiich his wife is a member, has no more regu- 
lar attendant than he. 

Willis Augustus Stites received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Newport. His 
schooling ended, he engaged in oystering with 
his father, and thereafter followed that occu- 
pation until 1893. He then gave up his sea 
life to help his father in shipping oysters at 
Bivalve. Mr. Stites has taken a very promi- 
nent part in local politics. In 1S94 he was 
elected Town Assessor for a term of three 
years. He has been Commissioner of Deeds 



since April, 1S96. He has been frequently a 
delegate to the county. State, and Congres- 
sional conventions. He fraternizes with the 
Newport Council, No. 199, of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics; and 
he is affiliated with two beneficial societies 
of Newport. His opinions concerning gen- 
eral national affairs bring him into associa- 
tion with the Republican party, whose prin- 
ciples and ticket he always supports. In 
religious sympathy he is a constant attendant 
of the Baptist church, of which he is a liberal 
supporter. 




I'HRAIM BATEMAN, M.U., a much 
esteemed physician of Cedarville, was 
born December 2, 1829, son of B. Rush Bate- 
man, M.D., and Sarah Ann (Ogden) Bateman. 
His grandfather, Ephraim Bateman, M.D., a 
son of Burgen Bateman, was born July 9, 
1780. Having received his early education 
in the public schools. Grandfather Bateman 
studied medicine in the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and subsequently practised his pro- 
fession with success for nearly the remainder 
of his lifetime. He served several years in 
both branches of the State legislature, then 
called Council. He also represented the 
State in the United States Senate. Ill health 
obliged him to resign his seat in the Senate; 
and he died soon after, on January 28, 1829. 
On October 8, 1802, he married his cousin, 
Sarah Bateman, daughter of William ]?ate- 
man, of Cedarville, and became the father of 
ten children. They were: Lydia, William, 
Benjamin Rush, Ephraim, Newton, Eber, 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Eleazar, Sarah, Harriet, and F.phraim (sec- 
ond). Lydia married Archibald Bancroft, 
and Harriet became the wife of James Bate- 
man, no relation though bearing the same 
name. Both parents were members of the 
Presbyterian church, the father being an 
IClder of the society. The mother's father, 
wiio, horn May 13, 1749, died December 18, 
1835, was a weaver by trade and an extensive 
land-owner. The maiden name of his wife was 
Sarah Smith, whom he married in 1772, Octo- 
ber 27. 

B. Rush Bateman, M.D., a native of Cedar- 
ville, born March 4, iiSo7, after attending the 
common schools of Cedarville for the usual 
period, completed the higher course of the 
Bridgeton Academy. He then read medicine 
with his father, and subsequently at the Jef- 
ferson Medical College, Philadelphia, from 
which he graduated in the class of 1829. 
Succeeding to liis father's practice, he was 
equally successful. While energetic and 
practical, he always carried a high ideal of his 
profession. He never refused a professional 
call, however jioor the applicant might have 
been. In consequence he was known and 
held in affectionate esteem by the residents of 
the district for miles around. He was inter- 
ested in the Port Norris Railroad, of which 
corporation he was Secretary and Treasurer for 
about five years. He served in all the town 
offices, was a member of the General Assembly 
for two years, and performed the duties of 
Justice of the Peace for a prolonged period. 
His connection with fraternal associations 
comprised membership in Welcome Friends 



Lodge, No. 48, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he was Past Grand; and in 
Cedarville Division, No. 36, Sons of Temper- 
ance. He retired some time before his death, 
which occurred July 23, 1883, in his seventy- 
seventh year. On December 10, 1828, he 
was married to Miss Sarah Ann Ogden, 
daughter of Thomas Ogden, of Cedarville, and 
had four children, three of whom grew to ma- 
turity. These are: Ephraim, Robert Morri- 
son, and Mary. Mary married Joseph Burt. 
Both parents were members of the old stone 
Presbyterian church. The father, who was 
the Treasurer and a Trustee, and for years its 
Sunday-school superintendent, was always ac- 
tive in its interests, and largely contributed 
to its support. 

Ephraim Bateman, M.D. , the eldest child 
of his parents, having made the usual course 
of the district school, then studied under the 
supervision of a jirivate tutor, and subse- 
quently read medicine with his father. With 
this preparation he was admitted to Jefferson 
College, from which in due time he gradu- 
ated in the class of 1851. Immediately after, 
he opened an office in his native town, where 
he has been in active practice since, and where 
he is now the oldest physician. He is a Di- 
rector of both the Cumberland National Bank 
and the Cumberland Mutual l'"ire Insurance 
Company. The representative of one of the 
oldest families in the localit)', he is naturally 
interested in the progress of the town, and has 
done the part of a loyal citizen in helping it 
as the opportunity offered. He states that its 
size at present is at least threefold what it was 



H10(;RAl'in(\.\L REVIEW 



ss 



wIiL-ii he was a boy. Mc was chosen Free- 
holder for many years, and was one of the 
three men who negotiated the war loan of 
Ciunberland County, a sum of two hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars. In the course of 
his life he has served the community in all 
the town offices, and is at present a member 
of the Town Council. 

On March 14, 1S59, he was married to 
Martha D., daughter of David Gale, Esq., of 
Cedarville, and has one child, Frank M., who is 
also a practising physician of Cedarville. He 
is a member of Welcome Friends Lodge, No. 
48, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
has been Grand Master of the New Jersey 
Grand Lodge. He has also membership in 
Good Will Encampment, No. 35, of which he 
has been Scribe since its formation. No man 
in the town holds a higher place in popular 
esteem than Dr. Ephraim Hateman. 



fT?)TON. BLOOMFIFLD 11. MINCll, of 
Bridgcton, member of the Assembly 
for Cumijerland County, was born 
on -a farm in Hopewelhtownship, this county, 
October 10, 1864. He is a son of Francis B. 
and Elizabeth H. (Tice) Minch, and belongs 
to one of the oldest and best families in the 
Union, native to Southern New Jersey for 
many generations. 1 1 is great-grandfather was 
15enjamin Minch. His grandfather was Arch- 
ibald Minch. Archibald Minch, a wealthy 
farmer of Hopewell, his native town, was very 
prominent in the community and active in 
public affairs. He was the last original 



stockholder of the Cumberland National liank, 
which was founded in 1812. A strong old 
Whig, he was the first man in the town to 
declare allegiance to the Republican party. 
Of his children only I<"rancis B. survi\-ed him. 

Francis B. Minch was liorn im tlie hdine- 
stead in Hopewell, August 14, 1833, and 
lived there fifty years. He personally super- 
intended his farm, which was an extensive 
one, until 1883, when he came to Bridgcton. 
He was one of the incorporators of the Bridge- 
ton National Bank, of which he has been Di- 
rector for many years ; and he is President of 
the North Bridgcton Land Company, whicJi 
was organized for the purpose of developing 
North Bridgcton. While in Hopewell he was 
a member of the Board of I'"reeholders of tlie 
township. After moving to the city he was 
elected a member of the City Council from 
the Third Ward. Mr. Minch is a prominent 
Mason, belonging to Brcarly Lodge, No. 2, 
and ]5rearly Chapter, No. 6. His wife, wlio 
is a native of Pittsgrove, Salem Count)-, lias 
bornediim three childien, namely: Robert I'"., 
who died at the age of twenty-three; Bloom- 
field H., the subject of this sketch; and Mary, 
the wife of E. I'reeman Crowell, of Lans- 
downe, Pa. Both parents are members of the 
First Presbyterian Church. 

The Hon. Bloomfield II. Mincli attended 
the common schools of IIo]iewell, graduated 
from the South Jersey Institute in the class of 
1S83, and finished a course of study at Bryant 
& Stratton's Business College, Philadeljihia, 
in May, 1884. In November of that year he 
formed with William O. Garrison a partner- 



S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ship, which still continues. The house of Gar- 
rison & Minch soon came to be looked upon as 
one of the most prosperous and reliable in the 
city of Bridgeton. They deal in all kinds of 
farm implements and agricultural produce, 
and are extensively engaged in the manufact- 
ure of fertilizers. They have the most exten- 
sive business of the kind in South Jersey, and 
give employment to from fifty to one hundred 
persons. Mr. Minch is a thorough business 
man. He was one of the incorporators and 
is now Treasurer of the Cumberland Construc- 
tion Company, of which Mr. Garrison is Pres- 
ident. The corporation, which makes a spe- 
cialty of bridge and wharf building, has 
satisfactorily executed many heavy contracts. 
On December 30, 1886, he was married to 
Miss Mary E. Rebeau, of Camden, N.J. Two 
children have blessed the union — Robert I", 
and Aleta E. Mrs. Minch died January 2, 
1896. In politics Mr. Minch has been prom- 
inent as a Republican for some time, and has 
been selected several times as a delegate to 
State conventions. In 1894 he was elected to 
the legislature by a large majority, and served 
on tile Commiticcs on Hanks and Insurance 
and Stationery, and tlie joint Committee on 
Federal Relations. In the fall of 1895 he 
was re-elected for the term of 1S96. He is 
Past Master of Brearly Lodge, No. 2, A. F. 
& A. M. , Past High Priest of Brearly 
Chapter, No. 6; a member of Olivet Com- 
mandery. No. 10; and he has been three times 
representative of the Grand Lodge of the 
State. He also belongs to Cohansey Lodge, 
No. 103, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 



and to the Junior Order of American Me- 
chanics. Both he and Mrs. Minch are mem- 
bers of the First Presbyterian Church. They 
have a beautiful home on West Commercial 
Street, which Mr. Minch has built since his 
marriase. 



♦^♦^> 




DVVARD MORTIMER MULFORD, 
Postmaster of Greenwich, was born at 
Roadstown, N.J., July 15, 1840, son of ]5en- 
jamin T. and Mary A. (F"ithian) Mulford. 
The family is entitled to be reckoned among 
the oldest in the State. Its founders, who 
came from England, after living for a short 
time in Salem, Mass., settled in East Hamp- 
ton, L.I., about the year 1649, purchasing 
land for their use from the Indians. Ben- 
jamin Mulford removed from East Hampton 
to Cape May, N.J , in 1699. One of his 
descendants, also named Benjamin, great- 
grandfather of Edward Mortimer, took u]) his 
residence in Roadstown, where, according to 
the records, he bought property in 1764. In 
1770 this Benjamin built the brick house situ- 
ated in the centre of the village, now occupied 
as a store by Joseph Whitaker, and still bear- 
ing on its north-east corner the date of its 
erection. 

Mason Mulford, grandfather of Edward 
Mortimer, was a native of Roadstown, born 
April 20, 1 761. He followed the occupation 
of farmer, and owned a number of farms in tlie 
vicinity. He also kept a hotel. In 1778, 
January i, he was united in matrimony with 
Margaret Teal, and became the father of nine 
children, of whom seven grew to maturity. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



57 



These were: I'hcebe, born Ai^ril 20, 1792, who 
married Garrison Maul, and died October 30, 
i860; John, born September 10, 1794, who 
died August 28, i860; Priscilla, born Octo- 
ber 10, 1796, who married David Minch, and 
died December 17, 1841; Elizabeth, born De- 
cember 1 8, 1798, who married Charles L. 
Watson, and died December 23, 1847; Nancy 
B. , born March i, 1802, who died August 23, 
1823; Maria, born December 9, 1807, who 
married Jonathan Bowen, and died October 20, 
1886; and Benjamin T., the father of Edward 
Mortimer. In religious belief both parents 
were Baptists. 

Benjamin T. Mulford, whose birth occurred 
in Roadstown, February i, 1804, was reared 
upon his father's farm, receiving his educa- 
tion in the district school. From 1835 to 
1840 he kept the Nelson House in Salem, 
N.J., carried on a livery business in connec- 
tion therewith, and drove the mail wagon over 
the route between Salem and Philadelphia. 
He then returned to Roadstown, bought the 
homestead, and engaged extensively in farm- 
ing operations. Subsequently he bought other 
farms, and owned as many as fourteen when 
he died. He made a specialty of grain rais- 
ing, and had large dealings in well-bred stock, 
especially in sheep. He was widely known 
for his remarkable breed of horses, called the 
VVintiower and Eclipse cross, noted for their 
great endurance on the road. It is told of 
him that he drove one of his horses ninety-six 
miles in one day, covering the last ten miles 
as speedily as the first. In the winter season 
it was his custom to speculate in grain and 



produce. He was one of the original sub- 
scribers to the stock of the West Jersey Rail- 
road, and had the gratification of seeing the 
road completed and of riding on it to Phila- 
delphia once before he died. On April 1 i, 
1829, he was married to Miss Mary Ann 
Fithian, daughter of I-jioch Fithian, an exten- 
sive land-owner of Beebe Run, near Bridgeton. 
Of their five children four reached maturity, 
namely: Enoch Mason, born March 11, 1836, 
who died July 31, 1854; Julia A., born De- 
cember 30, 1833, who married .Stephen G. 
Porch, of Franklinvillc, Gloucester County; 
Benjamin Fithian, born March 7, 1838, now- 
residing in Roadstown; and J'^dward M., the 
subject of this notice. The father and mother 
attended the Baptist church at Roadstown, of 
which they were liberal supporters. Tiie 
father donated the lot on which the parsonage 
is built. 

Edward Mortimer Mulford, after receiving 
his elementary education in the district schools 
of Roadstown, pursued a more advanced course 
at Union Academy, Shiloh, N.J., and at 
Bolniar Institute, West Chester, Pa. In due 
time he was athuittcd to the I'niversity of 
Lewisburg, Pa., now Bucknell Universit)'; 
but ill health obliged him to abandon his 
studies before he could graduate. Thereafter 
he lived with his mother in Bridgeton until 
his marriage, when he came to Greenwich. 
Here he had carried on a prosperous business 
in grain, coal, and fertilizers, for some time, 
when he retired in 1882. In 1894 he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster of the town, in which ca- 
pacity he has proved a most capable official. 



S8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



For a number of years he served the commu- 
nity as Town Councillor. On one occasion, 
when he allovvetl his name to be placed on the 
Democratic ticket for the Assembly, the party 
being in a hopeless minority, he received the 
largest vote ever cast in the town for an Assem- 
bly candidate of his party. He has also done 
good service as Supervisor of Roads. 

On May 7, 1862, he was married to Miss 
Margaretta 15. Ililliard, daughter of Reuben 
Milliard, of Greenwich, and became the father 
of five children. These were: Anna Viola, 
born May 14, 1863, who married on May 30, 
1894, William H. Caley, of West Chester, 
Pa.; lulward M., Jr., born January 7, 1865, 
who married Sybilla A. de Leur, January 9, 
i8go; Mary L. , born April 13, 1S69, who 
married Dr. J. Rulon Dare, March 26, 1891 ; 
Lizzie Elmer, born June 2, 1871; and Clare 
Milliard, born June 20, 1879. Both parents 
are members of Cohansey Baptist Church of 
Roatistovvn. Tiieir son, lulvvard M., Jr., is 
the ]iresent manager of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company at Chicago. When thir- 
teen years old he was placed in a telegraph 
office, just to keep him out of mischief during 
tiie summer vacations. Woi'king for two 
months every year in tliis way at the Long 
Branch office, he was an exjiert operator when 
he left school, so that lie was able to undertake 
regular work, lie was first sent to Camden, 
N.J., then to Champaign, III., after which he 
was assigned to Chicago, where he began as a 
claim clerk. In his leisure hours during the 
period in wliich he made his way to his [)res- 
ent position, he studied law assiduously, and 



was in due time admitted to the bar. He is 
the father of one child, Marjorie. Besides 
the office he fills in the Western Union's em- 
ployment he is also Attorney, and a Director 
of the Telegraphers' Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Chicago. 



pNENJAMIN F. HIRES, a dealer in 
ti)\ fertilizers, agricultural imjilements, 
coal and wood, and one of the suc- 
cessful business men of ]3ridgeton, was born 
February 15, 1858, near Salem, Salem County, 
son of John D. and Mary (Williams) Mires. 
The old Hires homestead is situated near 
Shiloh, this county. Jolin Hires, the grand- 
father of Benjamin F., was one of the early 
farmers of Hopewell, Mercer County. He 
was the father of eight children. 

John D. Hires, son of John, was born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1817, in Hopewell, and there grew 
to manhood. After reaching man's estate he 
was for many years successfully engaged in 
farming. I-'or eleven years he lived in Salem 
County; but in 1862 he returned to this 
county, and settled in Roadstown. He spent 
the last twenty years of his life engaged in 
buying and selling cattle and other stock on 
commission. In political affiliation lie was a 
stanch Democrat, and was frequently chosen 
to fill important town offices. For fifteen 
years he acted as Tax Collector of Hopewell. 
His wife, Mary Williams before marriage, 
was born at Port Elizabeth, N.J. Ten chil- 
dren were born of their union, of whom eight 
are living. These are: Cecelia, Rebecca, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



59 



Anna, Charles E., Isaac, William, Benjamin 
F., and Sally. Cecelia is the wife of John 
A. Wright, a confectionery dealer of Philadel- 
phia; Rebecca married Daniel Brook, of 
Bridgeton ; Anna is the wife of John Stremme, 
an engineer on the Reading Railroad; Cliarles 
E. is the original manufacturer of llires"s Root 
]5eer, which has become so famous all over the 
country; William is at present travelling in 
Australia for his brother, Charles E. ; and 
Sally is the wife of Thomas Kirkley, of 
Camden, N.J. The father died January 6, 
1878, and the mother two years later, on Jan- 
uary 8, 1880. Both were members of the 
Cohansey Baptist Church, which the father 
served for many years as Deacon. 

Benjamin F. Hires, who was four years old 
at the time his parents moved to Roadstown, 
received his early education in the schools of 
that town. Later he attended the Union 
Academy at Shiloh, which was then one of the 
leading schools in this section. On finishing 
there he joined his father in the drover's busi- 
ness, and followed it successfully afterward 
until his father's death. He then took charge 
of the home farm during the remaining years 
of his mother's life, and conducted it on his 
own account for seven years after his mother's 
decease. At the expiration of that time he 
came to Bridgeton, purchased the business of 
Ware & Ernest, dealers in fertilizers and agri- 
cultural implements, and has prosperously 
conducted it since. The establishment is 
one of the oldest stands in Bridgeton. The 
business is still increasing, and gives em- 
ployment to four men. The proprietor also 



owns real estate in this city and in other 
places. 

On November 27, 1879, Mr. Hires was 
united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth 
B. Oilman, of Roadstown. She is a daugh- 
ter of David S. and Rnsina (Caswell) Oil- 
man and a grand-daughter of William Oil- 
man. Her great-grandfather, Edward Oilman, 
was one of the pioneer farmers of Roadstown. 
The farm on which he lived was last sold in 
1757, and by will has now become the prop- 
erty of Mrs. Hires. Her father resided there 
for seventy-five years. Her mother, wlio was 
born in Philadelphia, was of English parent- 
age. P'or the past eleven years Mr. Hires has 
been an esteemed member of the Cumberland 
County Agricultural and Horticultural So- 
ciety, of which he is now the President. He 
has also served one year as Treasurer and 
nine years on the E.xecutive Committee of 
that society. Before coming to Bridgeton he 
served three years on the School Board of 
Roadstown. He and Mrs. Hires are commu- 
nicants of the Berean Baptist Churcli ol this 
city, Mr. Hires being also ['resident of its 
Board of Trustees. Their home is at tlie 
corner of Hampton and Atlantic Streets. 




i0B1':RT MOORE ALLEN, a fanner 
and dairyman of IIo|)eweIl, was born 
here, February 15, 1843, son of Jo- 
seph P. and Clara C. (Davis) Allen. His 
great-great-grandfather, Joseph Allen, who 
was born on April 20, 1746, was one of the 
first settlers of Mullica Hill, Gloucester 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



County. Joseph Allen was also one of the 
founders of the Society of Quakers, whose 
meeting-house at Evesham, N.J., he assisted 
in erecting. The grandfather, Joseph S. 
Allen, born May 5, 1778, near Mullica Hill, 
followed the occupation of general farmer. 
He was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
I'aucus, daughter of Edward Paucus, of Mullica 
Hill, by whom he became the father of five 
children. These were: Joseph P., the father 
of the subject of this sketch; Axia, now the 
wife of Charles Petiet, of Philadelphia; 
Thomas, who died several years ago in Ala- 
bama; Hannah, the wife of Samuel Gilling- 
ham, of Philadelphia; and Mary, who is the 
wife of Mr. Caliph Keeny, of I^hiladelphia. 
The father was prominent in the community, 
having been honored with several public 
offices. Politically, he was identified with 
the Whig ]5arty ; and in religious belief both 
he and Mrs. Allen were associated with the 
Quakers. He passed away October 21, 1821. 
Joseph P. Allen was born May 9, 1808, 
near Mullica Hill, in the house that was also 
the birthplace of his father. He received his 
education in the public schools of his native 
place. At the age of thirteen he was aj^pren- 
ticed to a blacksmith, successively in the 
neighboring towns of Woodbury and Woods- 
town. At the age of eighteen he went West 
with his uncle, anil completed his period of 
apprenticeship. Returning when twenty-one 
to his native State, he was employed as sheer 
of the stage horses at the old Pole Tavern on 
the Bridgeton turnpike. He then conducted a 
blacksmith shop at Fritztown (now Elmer), 



for a time, after which, in 1830, he removed 
to Shiloh, this county, and carried on the 
same business there for six years. Finally 
disposing of his shop and interest therein, he 
purchased his present farm. This property, 
still owned by him, distant about half a mile 
from the village, contains seventy-six acres, 
and is now conducted by his son, Robert M. 
On P'ebruary 21 he was united in marriage 
with Miss Clancey Davis, a daughter of Mr. 
Richard Davis, of Shiloh, who bore him three 
children. These were: Hannah, the wife of 
the late p:iias R. Pope, of Plainfield, N.J.; 
Thomas E., who resides in .Stoe Creek town- 
ship; and Robert Moore, the subject of this 
article. The father has served his town 
as a member of the Townshi]:) Committee and 
of the Board of Appeals. In politics he has 
always been a thorough Democrat. In relig- 
ious belief both he and his wife have been 
members of the Shiloh Seventh Day Bajitist 
Church. Mr. Allen has attained his eighty- 
ninth year, yet his mind is as clear and bright 
as when he was in his prime. He now resides 
with his son, Robert M. 

Robert Moore Allen received his early edu- 
cation in the district schools of his native 
town and at Union Academy in Shiloh. He 
then returned to his father's farm, on which 
he has since resided. He now manages that 
property, together with an adjoining estate 
recently purchased by him, carrying on gen- 
eral farming and dairying. On October 14, 
1876, he was united with Miss Sallie Thoni]:)- 
son, daughter of Mr. J. R. Thompson, of 
Penn's Grove, Salem County. He has now 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



6i 



three children — Ford, Wade, and Roy. His 
political principles are Republican. Both he 
and Mrs. Allen are members of the Seventh 
Day Baptist church. 



(JEREMIAH RORAY, for many years an 
esteemed resident of Bridgeton, was 
born October 9, 1834, in Fairfield, 
Esse.x County, son of Jeremiah S. and Rachel 
(Hogbin) Roray. His grandfather on the pa- 
ternal side was Anthony Roray, who is said to 
have come to this country from Germany. 
Jeremiah S. Roray was born in Cedar\'ille, 
Cumberland County. He learned the trade of 
a weaver, and thereafter followed it as his 
chief occupation. The last years of his life 
were spent in Bridgeton. His marriage with 
Miss Rachel Hogbin was blessed by the birth 
of seven children — Elizabeth, Hannah, Anna, 
Rachel, Jeremiah, Joseph, and John. Eliza- 
beth is the wife of William Otterson, of Phila- 
delphia; Hannah married James Conover, of 
Jersey City, N.J. ; Anna is the wife of Peter 
Griner; Joseph was killed in the battle of 
Cold Harbor; and John, who also served in 
the Civil War, while in service contracted a 
lung disease, from which he died at McClellan 
Hospital, July 3, 1S64. Rachel, a maiden 
lady, is the only one living now. The par- 
ents were members of the Baptist church. 

Jeremiah Roray received a good education 
in the common schools. He then entered 
the employ of the Cumberland Nail and Iron 
Company, where he learned the trade of a nail 
cutter. He continued with that company until 



August g, 1S63, when he enlisted for the war 
as a private in Company H, Twelfth Regiment 
of New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, entering 
upon his duties as a soldier September 4 fol- 
lowing. The regiment was assigned to the 
Eighth Army Corps. At the battle of the 
Wilderness Mr. Roray received a gunshot 
wound in the left hip. On April 14, 1865, 
he was transferred to Company I, Twentieth 
Regiment of the Veteran Reserve Corps, with 
which he was on duty at Washington, D. C, 
Alexandria, Va., and Wheeling, W.Va. He 
was honorably discharged at Wheeling on July 
II, 1865, after which he returned home, and 
re-entered the employ of the Cumberland Nail 
and Iron Company. Here he remained up to 
1886, when he retired from active work. His 
death, which occurred on December 8, 1888, 
was caused by hemorrhage. Mr. Roray was 
twice married, the first occasion on December 
24, 1866, when Miss Amelia Jane Roork be- 
came his wife. She bore him six children, 
as follows: Ellen H., born September 23, 
1867, who died October 11, 1867; Addie, 
born November 7, 1868, who died November 
7, 1869; Hattie, born April 23, 1871, who 
died October 10, 1871; Joseph H., born Au- 
gust 7, 1872, who died August 26, 1872; 
Salathiel A., born March 8, 1875, who died 
March 9, 1875; and Charles A., born Febru- 
ary 17, 1S76, who died June 28, 1876. The 
mother, who was born October 26, 1838, died 
February 25, 1876. Mr. Roray contracted his 
second marriage April 3, 1877, with Miss 
Susanna Dilks, a daughter of Elisha Dilks, 
of Gloucester County, New Jersey. Mr. 



62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Dilks's mother having died when he was an in- 
fant, he was taken by his uncle, Jonathan Bee, 
to the latter's home in Delaware. He lived 
with Mr. Bee, who was appointed his guardian, 
until his marriage, receiving the benefit of a 
common-school education. On reaching his 
majority he inherited a mill property in Salem 
County, whither he removed after his mar- 
riage, and was thereafter engaged in the saw- 
mill business until his death on September 
16, 1868. He married IVIiss Sarah Vander- 
grift, a daughter of Peter Vandergrift, and 
became the father of eleven children, eight of 
whom lived to maturity. These were: Eliza- 
betli, the wife of David Johnson; James, who 
married Miss Maria Padin; Rebecca, who 
married Henry Powell; Calvin T., who mar- 
ried Hannah Johnson, a daughter of David 
Johnson; Margaret R., who became the wife 
of Charles B. Roork ; George, who married 
Miss Charlotta Brown; .Susanna, of whom 
there is no special record; and Johanna H., 
wlio married Isaac P. Nixon. The parents 
were members of the Baptist church, and were 
among the founders of the society of that de- 
nomination at Alloway, N.J. Mrs. Susanna 
(Dilks) Roray was born I'"ebruary 19, 1835, 
and graduated from P'riesburg Seminary, in 
tlie class of 1855. She has continued to re- 
side in Bridgeton since her husband's death. 



TKTSON L. BACON, M.D., the 
oldest resident physician and sur- 
geon of Port Norris, N.J., where he 
has practised medicine for over a quarter of a 




century, was born at Woodstown, Salem 
County, this State, on the 21st of April, 
1836, son of William and Mary (Ray) Bacon. 

The father was a native of Cumberland 
County, having been born June 30, 1S02, at 
Greenwich, where he spent his earlier life, 
and received his first schooling. After ex- 
hausting the educational resources of his native 
town, he entered the literary department of 
the University of Pennsylvania with the idea 
of becoming a minister of the gospel. - 

William Bacon early joined the Presby- 
terian church, and always had a leaning 
toward the ministry as a profession up to the 
time when he commenced his course of study 
at the University. Beginning then to have 
doubts as to the reality of his conversion, in- 
stead of going into the Divinity School after 
completing his college course, he entered the 
Medical School, and was graduated at the age 
of twenty years. 

Some time later, when practising as a phy- 
sician at AUowaystown, where he had settled, 
he was convinced, through the influence of his 
pastor, tile Rev. Joseph Sheppard, that to 
preach the word of the Lord was his true call- 
ing. The flame of his desire for this work 
being kindled anew, he was ordained an evan- 
gelist, and journeyed through the lower coun- 
ties of New Jersey, preaching the holy gospel 
with a deserved success, the cause being, as 
some one has ajitly and truly put it, "a cause 
that never failed." In 1830 the Rev. Will- 
iam Bacon became the pastor of the Baptist 
church at Pitt's Grove. In 1833 he trans- 
ferred the scene of his labors to Woodstown; 



Jp% 



^^s^. 



■> 








/ 



STETSON L. BACON. 



i 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



(>S 



antl in 1841 he assumed charge of the little 
church at Dividing Creek, where he remained 
as pastor for eleven years. In all of these 
places he served both his Master and his flock 
faithfully and well. 

In the year 1S52, overburdened bv domestic 
affliction and the arduous nature of his duties, 
he decided to retire from that sphere of action 
and devote himself to his other profession, 
medicine, for which he was also eminently 
well fitted. For nearly a score of years he 
tended and guarded the bodies of men, as be- 
fore he had watched over and pointed the path 
for their souls. At the earnest request of his 
fellow-citizens he served two terms in- the 
State legislature, where his intelligence and 
strong moral worth commanded the respect 
and admiration of his associates in the House 
of Representatives. Dr. William Bacon died 
mourned by all who knew him, as a friend 
lost to all, in February, 1868. His wife, who 
was formerly a Miss Ray, of Philadelphia, 
survived him but twenty months, dying in 
October, 1869. 

Dr. and Mrs. William Bacon hail six chil- 
dren who arrived at the age of maturity — 
Clementine, now Mrs. Sutherland, of Mis- 
souri; William Ray, of Trenton, N.J. ; Re- 
becca, who died in Missouri; Abel, who is 
also dead; Stetson L. , of Port Norris; and 
Smith, at present a resident of Bridgeton. 
The grandfather of these children, Abel 
Bacon, was once a prominent citizen in this 
part of the State. The point of land known 
as Bacon's Neck was named after his progen- 
itor. 



Stetson L. Bacon, altliough born at Woods- 
town, did not spend much of his life there, but 
came with his father and mother to Newport 
when he was only one year old. Here the 
Rev. William Bacon had his residence while 
he was the pastor of the little flock at Divid- 
ing Creek — that is, for eleven years. Stetson 
L. received the rudiments of his broad educa- 
tion in the day school of this town, and then 
pursued a course of study at Tremont Semi- 
nary, a school conducted for young men by 
the Rev. Samuel Aaron. Here Mr. Bacon 
spent two sessions, in iS54and 11856. About 
this time he began reading medicine with his 
father and teaching school during the fall and 
winter months, besides attending a course of 
lectures at the Jefferson Medical College, 
from which institution he was graduated in 
the class of 1858. Working very hard during 
this period with his various imposed and as- 
sumed duties, he successfully accomplished 
his worthy purpose, that of becoming a well- 
educated physician; and he finally located 
with his father for practice at New])ort, wiu-rc 
he was for eleven years, gaining the utmost 
confidence and respect of his fellow-townsmen. 

After the death of his father and mother, 
overcome by grief. Dr. Bacon sold out his 
practice at Newport, and removed to Mantua, 
Gloucester County, where he was associated 
with Dr. Turner, but only remained there for 
four months, as Dr. Turner left 'the town, 
having been very sick. Dr. Bacon not wish- 
ing to take up a new practice there all alone, 
removed for the second time, coming to Port 
Norris- This place was at that period very 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



small, as the railroad was only just being 
built. In fact, it was only constructed as far 
as Fairton; and the business interests of Port 
Norris, as well as its other interests, were 
in, an infant state. Before the advent of Dr. 
Bacon there was no physician here, and his 
arrival and settlement was a very good thing 
for all concerned. Moreover, he was within 
easy reach of his old practice; and, as the 
town grew up around him, his business in- 
creased greatly with both sets of patients. 
He is the oldest general practitioner in South- 
ern New Jersey at the present day. 

Dr. Bacon married Miss Martha Washington 
Mayhew on the 23d of December, 1859. 
Miss Mayhew's father, John Mayhew, was one 
of the early business pioneers of the township, 
being a man who also proved his worth in 
different public capacities, being at various 
times Assessor and Collector, a member of 
the Township Committee, and a Freeholder. 
He is still living, at the remarkable old age 
of ninety years. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon have two children, a 
son and a daughter — Elizabeth, the wife of 
the Rev. William A. Walling, the well- 
known Baptist minister of Wilmington, Del.; 
and William Ray, who graduated with the 
class of 1 896 from the University of Rochester 
in Rochester, N.Y., with the degree of A. B., 
preparatory to undertaking the study of law at 
the Columljia College of the city of New York. 
Dr. Bacon was an active member of the 
Cumberland District Medical Association 
when he lived at Newport, but now he does 
not often attend its meetings. In the fall of 



189s he was elected to the office of Coroner 
for Cumberland County, which office he now 
holds. For sixteen years he was Overseer of 
the Poor of Commercial township. His poli- 
tics are distinctly Republican. During his 
earlier life he was a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows. 

For many years Dr. Bacon has been an ear- 
nest, active, and untiring member of the Bap- 
tist church, although he has never been an 
officer of the congregation to which he be- 
longs. He owns a fine house in Port Norris, 
where he has lived for over twenty-four years, 
and possesses one of the best and most elegant 
private libraries in the county. He always 
has on hand at his office a large stock of 
drugs and medicines in practical and wise 
anticipation of any emergencies that may 
arise. 



EEWIS D. YOUNG, a well-known and 
successful miller of Greenwich, and 
■^"^ also a native of the town, was born 
May 5, 1866, a son of Henry James and 
Beulah A. (Mulford) Young. His grand- 
father, who was also born here, and had but 
limited educational advantages, engaged in 
agriculture at Deerfield, this county. In the 
latter part of his life Grandfather Young by 
thrift and industry acquired a farm of his 
own, on which he made a specialty of cul- 
tivating grain. He married Miss Zcllie 
Chauk, a lady of French extraction, who bore 
him six children; namely, Henry James, 
Jacob, Jerome, Clarence, Victor, and Maxwell. 
Henry James Young, who was born in Deer- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



67 



field, March 6, 1832, obtained his early 
mental equipment in the common schools of 
his native town. At the close of his school- 
ing he engaged in the work on the paternal 
farm. When about eighteen years of age he 
applied himself to learn the miller's trade, 
which he subsequently followed as a journey- 
man until 1875. He then purchased his pres- 
ent mill, the same in which he was first em- 
ployed in 1851. He wedded Miss Beulah A. 
Mulford, a daughter of Enoch Mulford, of 
Greenwich, and became the father of Lewis 
D., the subject of this sketch. Mr. and Mrs. 
Young are members of the Presbyterian Church 
of Greenwich. 

Lewis D. Young received his education in 
the common schools of Greenwich. At the 
completion of his course of schooling he 
commenced to work in his father's mill, in 
which he has since engaged. Since March i, 
1895, he has rented the mill from his father. 
Erected in 18 10, it is one of the oldest as 
well as one of the largest mills in the county. 
It has been run by steam-power since 1891, 
and it is now conducted with great enterprise 
and success. On November 28, 1894, Mr. 
Young married Miss Martie T. Young, a 
daughter of Job RL Young, of Greenwich 
township. The two families were not previ- 
ously related. 



-rS ENJAMIN F. EDWARDS, merchant 
•)\ tailor, conducting a very successful 
business at Bridgeton, was born No- 
vember 9, 1839, in Lumberton, Burlington 



County, son of Richard P. and Matilda 
(Stiles) Edwards. His grandfather, Joseph 
Edwards, who was for forty years one of the 
leading store-keepers of Lumberton, died 
there in 1839, at about the age of eighty-five 
years. 

Richard P. Edwards, a native of Lumberton, 
born June 3, 18 10, acquired his education in 
the public schools of that town. On leaving 
school he went to Medford, N.J., where he 
learned the trade of a tailor. After complet- 
ing his apprenticeship he returned to Lumber- 
ton, and opened a shop, which he conducted 
with success up to 1S42, when he removed to 
Bakersville, Atlantic County. After a brief 
stay in the latter town he went to Alloway in 
Salem County. Alloway failed to meet his 
expectations as a place in which to establish 
his line of business. He subsequently tried 
other places, and finally, in 1848, settled in 
Woodstown, Salem County, where he remained 
about twenty years. In 1866 he came to 
Bridgeton, and two years later removed to 
Salem, where he worked as a cutter for John 
Dunn. Six years after he went West, and he 
died in 1881 at Hartford, Mich. He was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, also of the Sons of Temperance. His 
wife, Matilda, was a daughter of John Stiles, 
of Salem County. They were the parents of 
seven children ; namely, Joseph, Elizabeth, 
William H., Benjamin F., John, Anna, and 
Theodore F. Both parents were devoted 
Christians. 

Benjamin F. Edwards obtained a good, 
practical education in the public schools of 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Woodstown. He afterward learned the tailor's 
trade with his father, remaining at home until 
he was nineteen years of age. From that time 
until 1 86 1 he worked on farms during the 
summer and as a journeyman tailor in the 
winter. He then went to Daretown, Salem 
County, and set up in the tailoring business for 
himself. A year later, in 1862, he enlisted 
for service in the Civil War in Company A, 
Twelfth Regiment of New Jersey Volunteers, 
which joined the Army of the Potomac. 
After one year's campaigning he was honor- 
ably discharged on account of sickness. The 
first year after his return home was spent at 
farming. In 1S65 he came to Bridgeton, and 
entered the employ of the Cumberland Nail 
and Iron Company, with which he remained 
for sixteen years. In 1881 he again started 
in the tailoring business on his own account, 
and has since built up a large and lucrative 
trade. 

Mr. Edwards was married in 1862 to Miss 
Matilda Foster, a daughter of Matthew Foster, 
of Daretown. Of their five children four 
lived to maturity; namely, William, Theo- 
dore, Laura, and Hattie. The mother passed 
away in June, 1874. On January 26, 1876, 
Mr. Edwards formed a second marriage, by 
which he was united with Miss Esther D. 
Shull, a daughter of Samuel Shull, of Bridge- 
ton. A son and two daughters have been 
born 0/ this union — -Frank, Anna, and 
Jennie. Mr. Edwards has several times 
served as Judge of Elections. He is a charter 
member of E.xcelsior Lodge, No. 4, Knights 
of Pythias, of which he is Past Chancellor. 



He has also membership in the Thomas M. K. 
Lee, Jr., Post, No. 5, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, of Camden, N.J. ; and in the Ahwah- 
neeta Tribe, No. 97, Improved Order of Red 
Men. The family attend and support the 
Second Presbyterian Church, of which Mrs. 
Edwards is a member. 



TS^ /alter LOWRIE MINCH, a pros- 
Y^V^ perous market gardener of Hope- 
well, was born here on July 8, 1862, son of 
Lewis B. and Lydia M. (Veal) Minch. His 
father, who was likewise a native of Hopewell, 
born January 19, 1829, received his education 
in the district schools of that town, and re- 
mained on the old farm with his parents until 
he was twenty-nine years of age. Soon after 
his marriage he purchased near the paternal 
home a farm of about thirty acres, and was 
there engaged in farming for upward of six 
years. He then sold out to his brother, and 
purchased an adjoining farm of fifty acres, 
which he conducted up to 1872. On account 
of failing health he then abandoned farming, 
sold his estate, and taught school until 1875. 
His health being restored by this time, he 
rented a farm ; and, excepting a few years 
given to the milling business, he has since 
been engaged in agriculture. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, was Collector in 1S64, and 
Town Assessor from 1S77 to 1886, having 
been elected to that office on the Greenback 
ticket. On January 19, 1858, he was joined 
in marriage with Miss Lydia M. Veal, a 
daughter of David and Abigail (Moore) Veal. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



69 



Her father, who was born in Hopewell, De- 
cember 4, 1793, after passing his boyhood on 
a farm, upon reaching maturity engaged in the 
fishing industry, at which he was very success- 
ful, becoming in time the owner of large fish- 
ing interests off the coast. At one period he 
had a fish stand in a boat anchored where the 
Commerce Bridge is now located. In 1S63 he 
removed to Bridgeton, purchased a farm of one 
hundred acres, and there lived during the re- 
maining years of his life. He was a man of 
good judgment, and that he was fair-minded 
is attested by the fact that he was often called 
upon to settle questions in dispute among his 
neighbors. Among his friends and acquaint- 
ances he was familiarly known as Captain 
David. In politics he was a Republican. 
His wife, Abigail, whom he married February 
3, 1S24, was a daughter of Azariah Moore. 
The latter, a descendant of one of the pioneers 
of this State and a resident of what is now 
known as Harmony, was a weaver by trade, 
and made linen sheets and bed-spreads. Mr. 
and Mrs. Veal were the parents of four other 
children — David, James Henry, Francis, and 
Enoch. Francis is now deceased; and Enoch 
resides in Pierre, S. Dak. James Henry 
Veal, a prominent farmer, owns a farm that 
has been in the Veal family for upward of one 
hundred and fifty years. It has been succes- 
sively the property of Moses Veal (first), 
Moses (second), and Moses (third), the last 
named having been the grandfather of the 
present owner. l\Ir. Veal, Sr. , died in 1S79, 
and his wife in i860. Both attended and 
supported the Presbyterian Church of Deer- 



field. Lewis B. Minch and his wife have 
had five children, as follows: Abbie V., the 
wife of Orestes Cook, of Bridgeton; Walter 
L., the subject of this article; the Rev. 
Lewis Willard, of Delhi, Delaware County, 
N.Y.; the Rev. Richard, of Hawley, Wayne 
County, Pa.; and Priscilla M., who lives 
at home. The parents arc earnest Chris- 
tians. 

Walter L. Minch acquired a good common- 
school education at Hopewell. He remained 
with his parents on the farm up to 18S4, at 
which time he began to teach in the public 
schools. In 1SS6 he rented a farm belonging 
to his uncle, David Minch, and conducted it 
for five years. About the year 1891 he pur- 
chased the farm where he now lives, a market 
gardening property of about eight acres, all 
in a high state of cultivation. In 1895 he 
raised twenty-six thousand quarts of straw- 
berries, and between five and si.x thousand 
bunches of celery. He also deals extensively 
in poultry, averaging about a ton per week 
during the year. In 1885 he was married to 
Miss Leila A. Thompson, a daughter of Elijah 
Thompson, of Fairfield, Essex County. The 
union has been blessed by the birth of five 
daughters — Inez, Olive Lydia, Edith Mary, 
Leila A., and Helen E. 

Mr. Minch is a stanch Democrat. In 1886 
he was elected to the office of Assessor, and 
has held it continuously since that time. He 
is a member of Artenis Tribe, No. 198, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men ; also of Cohansey 
Lodge, No. 205, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Bridgeton. 



^Q 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



/^TeORGE DAVID LANGE, a well- 
\^X known baker of Bridgeton, was born 
April 30, 1857, near Berlin, Province of 
Brandenburg, Prussia, son of David and Her- 
minc (Spilhagen) Lange. David Lange, a 
native of Saxony, Germany, was born in 1824. 
After completing his school education he 
learned the baker's trade, and also engaged in 
farming. After residing in Berlin for many 
years he came in the spring of 1896 to Amer- 
ica, and took up his residence with his son 
George in Bridgeton. He has always been in 
business on his own account, and has been 
generally successful. His wife, Hermine, 
was a daughter of Frederick Spilhagen, of 
Saxony. Mr. Spilhagen was a forester, who, 
according to the laws, was obliged to serve a 
certain length of time in the army, pass an 
examination as forester, and then have charge 
of a particular section of the forest for life. 
His means, ability, and education gave him 
a high social standing. He served in the 
army against Napoleon, and was highly es- 
teemed by the limiierors of both Russia and 
Prussia, who conferred on him several decora- 
tions. 

George David Lange received his education 
in Germany. He was then apprenticed to a 
pniminent baker near lieilin, who had an ex- 
tensive business. At the ex]iiration of three 
years Mr. Lange travelled through Germany, 
Switzerland, and I*" ranee. Until 1882 he 
spent most of his time with his father. On 
first coming to America he located in Phila- 
delphia, but subsequently came to Bridgeton. 
IV'iug unable to speak English, he found it 



difficult to make his way. After working as a 
journeyman for one year he bought out Mrs. 
Piatt's business on Elmer Street, and there 
subsequently built up a flourishing trade. 
When he came to Bridgeton he had less than 
one dollar. He now owns ten thousand dollars' 
worth of property. A conspicuous part of 
this property is his fine home and business 
establishment at 275 East Commerce Street, 
one of the best parts of the city. His lot, 
with a frontage of seventy-two feet, extends 
back to Cedar Street. In the rear he has built 
a good brick oven and bakery, and is one of 
the most successful men in that line of busi- 
ness in the city. 

In 1889, March 21, Mr. Lange was married 
to Miss Jane Dunnington, of London, Eng- 
land, and now has four children — Evelyne, 
Bernhardt, Raymond, and Hilda Lange. He 
is an esteemed member of Brearly Lodge of 
Masons. 



—♦-•■••-*— 



:^ENJAMIN F. MAUL, a resident of 
<^ Greenwich, who has retired from 
business, was born July 14, 1828, in 
Bridgeton, this county, son of Garrison and 
Phcebe (Mulford) Maul. Garrison Maul, born 
in 1787, was one of the most jirominent men 
in Bridgeton in the early days of the nine- 
teenth century. He was engaged in cutting 
and shipping timber to Philadelphia, and also 
bought wood and shipped it to the city marts, 
this being one of the leading industries in 
those days. He lived at the place since 
owned by Mr. Joseph A. Clark, and up to the 
time of his last illness was actively engaged 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



71 



in business. His wife, Phoibe, a daughter of 
Mason Mulford, of Roadstown, this county, was 
born in 1792. By him she had seven children 
who grew up to maturity. These were: Mar- 
garet, who was the wife of Thomas Garrison, 
and moved to Ohio; Mary, now deceased, 
who was the wife of Lewis Goodwin, of Salem, 
N.J. ; Lucius, who after a visit to California 
died in Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, the wife of 
Charles L. Watson, who died young; Maria, 
now deceased, who was the wife of the Rev. 
Charles King, of Mullica Hill; Benjamin F. , 
the subject of this sketch; and William, who 
now lives at Omaha. Two children. Mason 
and Phoebe, died while still very young. The 
father died at Roadstown, May 26, 1835. 
The mother, who survived her husband a 
quarter of a century, died October 3, i860. 
Both were faithful members of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Bridgeton. Mrs. MauTs 
father, Mason Mulford, attended the same 
place of worship, and was a strong, representa- 
tive farmer of Roadstown, where he resided 
until his death, which occurred September 2, 
1836, when he had attained the age of seventy- 
five years. He was well known as one of the 
early and most prominent settlers of Cumber- 
land County. The maiden name of his wife 
was Margaret Teal. 

Benjamin F. Maul, the fifth child of his 
parents, was educated in the district schools 
of Bridgeton and Roadstown. His mother 
lived in the latter town after the death of her 
husband. Benjamin was placed with his 
uncle, Benjamin T. Mulford, with whom he 
lived until he was nineteen years of age. He 



then came to Greenwich, where he was en- 
gaged in farming for four years. After that 
he went into a general merchandise establish- 
ment, and was employed there for three 
years. During the following quarter of a 
century or more he was engaged in business in 
Greenwich, chiefly as a shipper. He later 
owned his own vessels, mucli increased his 
business, and shipped goods to New York and 
Boston. One winter, at a time when he was 
doing a large trade in potatoes with Baltimore 
and Richmond, he went to Nova Scotia, and 
bought up fifteen thousand bushels. These 
he shipped South, clearing a large profit. He 
was one of the largest grain buyers and ship- 
pers in the county. When the shipping busi- 
ness dropped off, Mr. B. F. Maul and others 
built and started a great packing and canning 
establishment. Here he put up tomatoes, 
beginning with four hundred thousand cans in 
the first year, and afterward running the num- 
ber up to one million, one hundred thousand 
cans in twelve months. The brand of tomatoes 
used is widely known as the Greenwich Brand. 
He also has put up in his establishment out- 
side brands of the same vegetable for other 
men; as, for instance, a few years ago, he 
canned ten thousand cases for Mr. E. C. 
Hazard. The product of these canning fac- 
tories is sent to New York, Boston, Provi- 
dence, and other large cities. They used to 
employ about one hundred and twenty women, 
besides fifty men; and the business proved to 
be of great value to the town in general as a 
local industry. Mr. Maul continued active in 
the business until the fall of 1895, when the 



72 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



factories were almost totally destroyed by fire. 
He then sold out his interest in what remained 
of the concern, and retired from active busi- 
ness to take a well-earned rest for the remain- 
ing years of his life. 

Mr. Maul married Miss Sarah Bowen 
Bacon, December 13, 1848. She was a 
daughter of William and Mary Bacon, of 
Greenwich. Mr. Bacon was a resident of 
Bacon's Neck, where he lived with his father, 
Abel Bacon, and for which they had a parch- 
ment deed, made out by the Indians, who in- 
habited the place before them. The Bacons 
lived there during the early part of this cen- 
tury, so that they had to retreat inland when 
the British landed there during the War of 
I 812. Mr. William Bacon, the father of Mrs. 
Maul, died when fifty-four years old. Mrs. 
Maul was born June 13, 1828. Of her chil- 
dren the only one living is Annie H., now 
the wife of Bolton Lott, of l^ridgeton. Mr. 
and Mrs. I.ott have five children — Frank 
Maul, Mary B., Emma L., Henry B., and 
Ralph B. Annie, a si.xth child, is now de- 
ceased. Mary Elizabeth, a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Benjamin V. Maul, died July 13, 
1886, at the age of thirty-si.x years. 

Notwithstanding the loss he sustained by 
the destruction of the canning factories, he is 
still in comfortable circumstances, and owns 
valuable real estate in the township. In 1859 
he built a fine house on Majile Street, and he 
has lived here ever since. With an eye for 
comfort and beauty, he had a very fine lawn 
levelled in front of the house, and with his 
own hands set out and tended a number of 



beautiful trees upon it. For a long time he 
has been independent in political matters, al- 
though early in life he was a Republican. 
Both he and his wife are earnest members of 
the Cohansey Baptist Church of Roadstown. 



KRANK JERRELL LORE, Constable 
of Bridgeton, was born in Maurice- 
town, N.J., June 18, 1867, son of Ichabod and 
Catharine (Robinson) Lore. His grandfather, 
Frazier Lore, a native of Mauricetown, was a 
prosperous farmer and a very large land- 
owner, a public official with a most creditable 
record made in all the more important of the 
town offices, and a citizen whose opinion was 
frequently sought and deferred to in all 
matters pertaining to local affairs. Frazier's 
children were: Daniel, Ichabod, Jane, Annie, 
and Mary. Daniel is a resident of Newport, 
N.J. ; Jane, now deceased, was the wife of 
Captain George Hunter; Annie is married to 
Captain Charles Studams; and Mary is mar- 
ried to Captain John Avis. The father was a 
prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Ichabod Lore was also born in Maurice- 
town. He spent five years under the instruc- 
tion of Squire Mickel, learning the shoe- 
maker's trade. After working a little longer 
with the Squire as journeyman he started in 
business for himself in Mauricetown. Wlien 
the first bridge built across the Maui'ice River 
at that place was completed, he was appointed 
tender and toll-taker by the Board of Free- 
holders. He discharged the duties of this 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



post for eleven years, at the same time carry- 
ing on a prosperous business at shocmaking 
in a shop built by him close to the bridge. 
His death, which was the result of 'a sun- 
stroke, occurred while his son Frank was too 
young to remember more than his appearance 
on the day of his burial. He was a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
Mauricetown and of the Knights of Pythias at 
Dorchester. His wife, who was a daughter of 
Captain Hosea Robinson of Mauricetown, had 
four children, two of whom, the subject of this 
sketch and Jane, attained maturity. She was 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and died about one year before her husband. 
Frank Jerrell Lore by his father's death 
was left without a parent when but a mere in- 
fant. He was taken charge of by his step- 
grandmother, Emeline Lore, when he was 
about eight years old. During the ne.\t three 
or four years he spent the summer season 
abroad the wood shallop of Captain Jacob 
Hunter, helping the cook, and the winter 
living with Captain Hunter and attending 
school. The Captain finally sent him away, 
saying he would not be able to kec]i him dur- 
ing the ensuing winter. Utterly friendless 
then, being about eleven or twelve years old, 
the boy sturdily took his own case in hand. 
He went to Ricker Robbins, a keeper of a 
livery stable, and agreed with him to put up 
such of his horses as returned late at night, 
and sweep the stable in the morning, in return 
for the privilege of sleeping in a bunk nailed 
upon the wall of the stable ofifice. This was 
his lodging for the following winter, during 



which he managed to earn the price of food 
by doing errands in the daytime. In the 
spring his services were hired by Captain 
Daniel Garrison for the latter's oyster boat, 
at the wages of one dollar per week, a sum 
that seemed a fortune to Mr. Lore at that 
time. He returned to the livery stable in the 
summer, and remained until the fall. It had 
been his intention to continue there through- 
out the winter; but one day Mr. William J. 
Royal — "as nice a man as ever drew the 
breath of life," Mr. Lore says — stopped him 
on the street, ami engaged to give him a good 
home if the boy would go and live with him. 
Although Robbins tried to prevent him by 
asserting that Royal would ill-treat him, he 
accepted the offer, and soon found the change 
very much to his advantage. Si.x months 
after he was well dressed, had plenty of pocket 
money, and felt that he was treated as kindly 
as if he were his employer's only child. His 
duties required him to attend to some horses, 
and to care for fifteen or twenty bird dogs. 
When Mr. Royal died the boy grieved for him 
as a son woulil. In 1887 Sheriff Benjamin F. 
Shaw appointed Mr. Lore turnkey and Deputy 
Sheriff. These offices he filled l)y him until 
1889, when he resigned them to accept a posi- 
tion with William Ruddeacon, at that time 
L^nited States Marshal of Trenton, N.J. 

While serving as turnkey under Mr. Shaw, 
Mr. Lore conceived the idea of qualifying 
himself for the business of a detective b}' 
making a study of the criminals under his 
charge. Pursuing this plan further, after hav- 
ing spent three months with the marshal of 



74 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFIVIEW 



Trenton, during which time he seized and sold 
three vessels, he engaged as street-car con- 
ductor for two years in Philadelphia, and sub- 
sequently for another lengthy period in 
Bridgeton, in order to study human nature. 
At the same time he was employed in detec- 
tive work, being free to go and come as he 
pleased. In the course of time he was so suc- 
cessful that his services came to be in greater 
demand than he was able to supply. He now 
keeps several men employed as assistants. In 
the year 1895 he served three hundred war- 
rants. A remarkable sample of his work was 
the case of twelve colored thieves, who, act- 
ing in concert as a gang, terrorized the country 
round by the boldness and magnitude of their 
depredations. Within forty-two days he suc- 
ceeded in bringing all to trial, secured their 
conviction, with sentences ranging from eigh- 
teen to thirty-four years in the State prison, 
obtaining for his recompense the sum of four- 
teen hundred dollars. One of his latest cases 
of this sort ended in the October term of 
1895, when he sent eighteen chicken thieves, 
who had stolen property to the value of five 
thousand dollars, to the penitentiary. Mr. 
Lore considers his best piece of work the 
arrest and the conviction of the desperado, 
Howard .Shull, against whom he had fourteen 
warrants. There were forty-eight warrants 
out for the apprehension of Shull, for crimes 
committed in New Jersey, Maryland, Dela- 
ware, and Pennsylvania; and he went about 
armed with a brace of revolvers. Mr. Lore 
secured him near Ogden's Gut, N.J., after a 
desperate struggle. 



In September, 1890, Mr. Lore was united 
in matrimony with Hannah Nieukirk, daugh- 
ter of John Nieukirk, of Bridgeton, and is 
now the father of two children — Frank J. and 
Henry T. Mrs. Lore is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Lore is in 
affiliation with Cohansey Lodge, No. 205, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. He was 
elected Constable of Bridgeton in 1895, and 
re-elected in 1S96 for three years. 




RANK GANDY, of Fairfield, the orig- 
inator of the strawberry known as 
"the Pride of Cumberland," was born at 
Sayre's Neck, then a part of Fairfield, but 
now in Lawrence township, October 4, 1832. 
His parents were Nathan and Hannah (How- 
ell) Gandy. His father, who lived on Jones's 
Island at the time of the British occupation of 
Cedar Creek, distinctly remembers seeing the 
red-coated soldiers, and was desirous at the 
time of fighting them. During his active life 
Nathan was a prosperous farmer at Sayre's 
Neck. His wife was a daughter of Charles 
Howell, also a farmer of Sayre's Neck, who 
served in the War of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. 
Gandy joined the congregation of the old 
stone church (Presbyterian) of Fairfield ; and 
Mr. Gandy served it in sundry capacities. 
Their chihlren were: Hannah and Nathan, 
twins, the former now the widow of the late 
John More, of Bridgeton, and the latter a busi- 
ness man of Camden, N.J. ; Ruth, the widow 
of Eli Camm, of Fairton; Henry, a farmer of 
this town; Frank, the subject of this sketch; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



75 



Francis, Frank's twin brother, wiio lives at 
Sayre's Neck; and Joseph, a farmer in New- 
port, this county. 

Frank Gandy received a common-school edu- 
cation in Fairfield, and started to earn a liv- 
ing when sixteen years old. He first found 
employment on an oyster boat. Much of the 
ensuing twenty-one years was spent on the 
water, actively engaged in the oyster business, 
and in due course becoming master of a boat. 
He suffered many of the mishaps which befall 
the oyster man, and was at one time so seri- 
ously injured that he barely escaped with his 
life. In 1861 he enlisted in Compan)' D, 
Twenty-fifth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
as a nine months' man, for service in the 
Civil War. The regiment, which was as- 
signed to the Army of the Potomac, went first 
to Fairfax Court-house. He would have par- 
ticipated in the battle of Fredericksburg, had 
he not been ill with typhoid fever in the 
hospital at the time of the engagement. 
When convalescent he was shipped to Fort 
Schuyler Hospital on Long Island, and was on 
duty in the convalescent camp until the end of 
his term of service, when he received his dis- 
charge. Though bearing the rank of Corporal 
and anxious to honor his stripes, he was so 
weakened by his prolonged illness that he did 
not re-enlist. Instead he purchased the farm 
he now owns, and turned his attention to agri- 
culture. Since then he has erected the house 
he now occupies, made many im])rovements on 
the farm, and put the greater part of the 
seventy acres under cultivation. Perceiving 
the opportunities for fruit raising offered by 



this part of the State, he was one of the first 
to engage in that business. He makes a 
specialty of strawberry culture, to which he de- 
votes all of six acres. He has been very suc- 
cessful in propagating new varieties of this 
fruit; and his "Pride of Cumberland," a hardy 
berry with a perfect blossom, is one of the 
best, if not the best, on the market. This 
berry he developed from one plant five years 
ago, and he now has agents selling it through- 
out South Jersey. 

On November 15, 1855, Mr. Gandy was 
married to Miss Pheebe Thompson, daughter 
of Butler Thompson, who owned the farm now 
occupied by Mr. Gandy. She died January 
16, 1862, at the age of twenty-six, leaving 
two children. One of these, Eva, who was 
born February 23, 1857, is now the wife of 
Charles Fisher, of Lawrence township, and 
the mother of seven children — Sarah, How- 
ard, Amy, Abbic, Ida, 1 larry, and Carrie. 
Abbie is now deceased. On May 35, 1864, 
Mr. Gandy was again married, his bride being 
Miss Fannie A. Williams, who was born Sep- 
tember 30, 1842, daughter of William Scott 
Williams, of Hopewell, this county. I-'our 
children were born of this union, namely: 
Anna, who lived but four years; Frank D., 
a farmer, whose property adjoins his father's, 
who married Miss Anna Williams, and has 
two children — Lucy and Charles; Ruth, the 
wife of B. Frank Howell, a farmer at Uutch 
Neck, near Bridgeton ; and William Scott, 
who lives with his father. B. Frank Howell, 
born at Sayre's Neck, November 2, 1868, is a 
son of Henry M. and Lydia B. (Woodruff) 



76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Howell, a nephew of Timothy Woodruff, of 
Bridgeton, and a brother of Benjamin Howell, 
member of Congress. He and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church at Cedar- 
villc, this county, and have one child, Robert 
Gamon, who is but two years old. Mr. 
Gandy is an independent in politics, voting 
for the best man. He is a member of Wel- 
come Friends Lodge and the encampment of 
Cedarville. His wife and family arc members 
of the Presbyterian church in I'airton, this 
county, of which he has been a Trustee for 
several years. 




HARLh:S DICKINSON MOORE, a 



JT jirosperous farmer and stock raiser 
of Deerfield township, Cumberland 
County, N.J. , was born in Bridgeton on Feb- 
ruary i.S, 1X37. His parents were James S. 
and Maria (Coombs) Moore. Dickinson 
Moore, the grandfather of Charles D. , was a 
descendant of one of three brothers who came 
to this country from England. He was a resi- 
dent of Jones Island (Cedarville), and there 
followed a farmer's life. His son, James S. 
Moore, was born in Cedarville, Jones Island, 
and lived in that place until early manhood, 
when he went to sea. After he became 
master of an oyster boat he was unfortunately 
stricken with typhoid fever, and taken home to 
die. His only child was Charles D. Moore, 
the subject of this biography. The mother, 
Mrs. Maria C. Moore, after the death of her 
first husband married Joseph Woodruff, of 
Bridgeton, and by this union had si.\ children. 



She lived until 1878. She was a respected 
member of the Baptist church, although her 
ancestors were Presbyterians. 

Charles D. Moore attended the Bridgeton 
public schools and later the Philadelphia 
High School, after which, being fond of 
horses and life out of doors, he inclined 
toward farming, and worked on the home 
farm until his marriage. He then began 
farming on what was known as the parsonage 
farm, where he remained eight years. In 
1869 Mr. Moore came to his present farm of 
sixty acres, where he carries on general agri- 
cultural pursuits to ex'cellent advantage, hav- 
ing all the latest appliances therefor. Besides 
cultivating the soil, he keeps stock of a good 
quality, thereby enhancing his material gains. 
Mr. Moore votes the Republican ticket, but 
he is not an aspirant for political honors. 

He was married on February 21, 1861, to 
Rhoda Davis, a native of this township, a 
daughter of Ephraim and Martha (F"ithian) 
Davis. The Davises were one of the old fam- 
ilies here. David Davis, the grandfather of 
Mrs. Moore, was a farmer, and owned the old 
homestead, where he died when he was com- 
paratively young. His son Ephraim was born 
on the home farm on July 21, 181 1, and 
always lived there. He had a fine property, 
and was one of the very successful farmers of 
the town, being able to engage to some extent 
in money loaning. His wife, who was for- 
merly Miss Martha P'ithian, of Hopewell, 
was the daughter of Ebenezer Fithian. They 
had two children — Susie, who married Joseph 
L. Davis; and Rhoda, the wife of Charles D. 



I 




CHARLES D. MOORE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



79 



Moore, as above mentioned. The family 
were members of the old Presbyterian church 
in Deerfield Street for sixty-eight years. Mr. 
Ephraim Davis served as Trustee and superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school, but refused to 
bean Elder. He died on October 28, 1895; 
and his widow, Mrs. Martha E. Davis, sur- 
vived him but a few days, passing away on 
November 4, 1895, at eighty-two years of age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moore have two children, 
namely : Martha, who married Mr. Erank 
Garrison, of Bridgeton, and has four children 
— May, Susie, Mattie, and Lizzie; and Maria, 
the wife of Mr. George Cake, also a resident 
of Bridgeton. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have not 
departed from the ancestral faith, being highly 
respected members of the old Deerfield Street 
Presbyterian Church, in which he ofificiates as 
Treasurer and Trustee. 




NDREW PROVOST G E A N D E N, 
M.D., a jjrominent and successful 
physician of Newport, was born in 
l'hila(.lcli)hia. Pa., December 22, 1841, son of 
James and Sarah (Smith) Glamlen. lie is of 
Scotch extraction on the paternal side and of 
English extraction on the maternal side. His 
grandfather, James Glanden, who came from 
Scotland, settled in Salem, N.J. 

James Glanden, Jr., who was born in Salem, 
acquired his education in the common schools 
of that town. He then learned chair-making, 
worked at it for about five years as a journey- 
man, and removed to Philadelphia, where he 
established himself in the furniture business. 



This he conducted until 1857, when he retired 
from active occupation. He continued his 
residence in Philadelphia until 1862, when he 
removed to Mantua, Gloucester County, N.J., 
and there resided during the remainder of his 
days. Mr. Glanden was united in wedlock 
with Miss Sarah Smith, of Burlington, N.J. 
A native of England, in her fifteenth year she 
came to this country with her parents, who 
took up their residence in Burlington. She 
bore her husband four children, namely: Har- 
riet, who married David Rudolph, of Philadel- 
phia; George, a resident of Philadelphia; 
Andrew Provost, the subject of this sketch; 
and Mary, who is the wife of George Skid- 
more, one of the prominent overseers in the 
Hamilton Diston Saw Works at Tacony, Pa. 
The father was affiliated with the Order of 
Masons, being connected with the Richmond 
Lodge of Philadelphia. He was also a mem- 
ber of the Robert Morris Lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows and the encampment in the same city, 
with the rank of Past Grand, and filling the 
oflfice of Treasurer. He was a niembei- of the 
Methodist p43iHcoi)al Ciuirch of Philadclpliia, 
was a very active worker in the .Sunday-school 
connected with that society, while he took a 
deep interest in all benevolent enterprises that 
came to his notice. His decease occurred in 
1866. 

Andrew Provost (ilanden, M.D., was edu- 
cated in the public schools and in a select [iri- 
vate school of Philadelphia. At the age of 
nineteen he engaged in school teaching in 
Camden County, New Jersey, where he con- 
tinued in that calling about six years. He 



8o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



thcjn taught in Philadelphia for several years, 
and subsequently for a number of years in 
Gloucester County, New Jersey. While so 
engaged he pursued a course of reading in 
medicine under the direction of Dr. J. M. 
Boisnot, of Philadelphia, for a year, and later 
for another year with Dr. J. R. Sickler, of 
Mantua, N.J. In 1864 he matriculated in 
Jefferson Medical College, from which he 
graduated in the class of 1865. Receiving 
then a commission from Governor Parker as 
assistant surgeon of the Thirty-ninth New 
Jersey Regiment, he went to the front, re- 
maining with that regiment until the close of 
the Civil War. He then settled at Mantua, 
and commenced the practice of his profession. 
After remaining there about four years he re- 
moved in 1 87 1 to Newport, exchanging loca- 
tions with Dr. Stetson L. Bacon. He is now 
the oldest physician in Newport, and enjoys 
the most extensive general practice. Dr. 
Glanden is reputed to be the most successful 
practitioner in obstetrics in the southern part 
of the county, having never lost a case. He 
has also had phenomenal success with cases of 
typhoid fever. 

On September 4, 1863, Dr. Glanden was 
joined in wedlock with Miss Caroline Tonkin, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Tonkin, 
of Mantua. They have had six children, four 
of whom are still spared to them, namely: 
Walter P., a ])ractising physician at Cedar- 
ville, N.J., who married Miss Lillian Mont- 
gomery, of Philadelphia; Elizabeth, who was 
given in marriage to Captain John Shaw, of 
Newport; Frank F., a resident of Philadel- 



phia; and Robert T., who expects to matricu- 
late at the Jefferson Medical College next 
fall. Walter P., who is considered a skilful 
surgeon, has been very successful in abdomi- 
nal surgery, having safely removed a number 
of large cancers. The father. Dr. Andrew P. 
Glanden, participates very actively in local 
affairs, and served efficiently on the Township 
Committee for several terms, an office which 
he also held in Mantua. He was likewise a 
Justice of the Peace for five years. He is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge at Cedarville. 
In national political belief he is an earnest 
and vigorous supporter of the principles of the 
Democratic party. Religiously, his senti- 
ments and sympathy bring him into associa- 
tion with the Episcopal chuich. 



^OHN FRAZIER JOHNSON, a whole- 
sale and retail dealer in flour and grain 
at Bridgeton, was born May 25, 1857, 
in Friesburg, Salem County, son of Adam and 
Frances Maria (Frazier) Johnson. Adam 
Johnson, also a native of Friesburg, born in 
1829, received his education in the common 
schools of his native town. After leaving 
school he remained for several years with his 
parents, and then began farming for himself. 
In 1884 he purchased a piece of property lying 
near Finley Station, this county. This he 
cultivated until 1893, and then retired from 
active life. He and his wife hail a family of 
twelve children, namely: Daniel S., who re- 
sides near Fairton, this county; John P'razier, 
the subject of this article; Charles VV., a resi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



8i 



dciit of Deerfiekl, N.J.; Joseph E., a resident 
of Bridgeton; Matilda, who is the twin sister 
of Joseph E. and the wife of Harry Connor, 
of Woodruff, N.J. ; Samuel C. , a clergyman, 
residing at Sheffield, Vt. ; Ananias G., who is 
in business at Bridgeton with his brother, 
John E.; David H., of Bridgeton; Susan O., 
of whom there is no special record; Elizabeth, 
who is the wife of Mr. Leslie Mixner; Rich- 
ard, residing in Bridgeton; and Mary, the 
twin sister of Richard. Their grandfather was 
David Johnson, who, after receiving a com- 
mon-school education, kept a hotel for a time, 
and was thereafter engaged in farming: 
throughout the remainder of his life. In re- 
ligious belief both parents were Methodists 
and members of the Central Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Bridgeton. 

John Frazier Johnson, having been educated 
in the common schools of Deerfiekl, com- 
menced working for his living by raising gar- 
den produce. He continued in this business 
until he was twenty-four years of age, when he 
rented a farm, which he managed for four 
years. Removing to Bridgeton in 1884, he 
went into the livery business, in partnership 
with his uncle. This arrangement had con- 
tinued for about a year when, in 1885, he sold 
out his interest to his uncle, and engaged in 
the flour and grain business, in which he has 
since achieved considerable success. 

On April 20, 1881, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Jennie Z. Lindsey, a native 
of Middletown, N.Y. , and a daughter of Mr. 
James Lindsey, now a resident of Bridgeton. 
She died June 15, 1895. For three years Mr. 



Johnson has been a member of the Election 
Board of Bridgeton, and at one time he was 
also Judge. In 1893 he was elected from 
Ward I to the Common Council for a term of 
three years, during which he served on the 
Fire Committee, on the Printing and Ord- 
nance Committee, and on the Finance Com- 
mittee. For seven years he was a member of 
the Bridgeton Fire Department, and has filled 
the offices of President and Secretary of that 
department. He is also a member of the 
Board of Trade, which has made him its Vice- 
President. He is President of the Home and 
Real Estate Investment Company and of the 
Bridgeton Real PIstate Company. His con- 
nection with fraternal orders includes member- 
ship in Cohansey Tribe, Improved Order of 
Red Men, of which he is Past Sachem. 



w^. 



LLIAM SHULL PERRY, a re- 
Ired farmer of Hopewell, was born 
January 3, 1827, near his present home, son 
of Jeremiah and Filia B. (Husted) Perry. 
His grandfather, Jolin Perry, born in 1790, 
was also a native of Hopewell, where he 
passed nearly all his days in the occupation of 
farming. John, who was very patriotic, 
served his country in the War of 1S12. Jere- 
miah Perry, a son of John, likewise born in 
Hopewell, received his early education in the 
public schools of this town. When arrived at 
maturity, he engaged in farming, which he 
followed thereafter as his chief occupation. 
He was united in marriage with Miss Filia B. 
Husted, a daughter of Joseph Husted, of 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Hopewell. The union was blessed in the 
birth of three children, namely: John, who is 
now deceased; William S., the subject of this 
sketch; and Jeremiah, who resides in the 
town of his nativity. The father died while 
his children were yet quite youny. The 
mother some years later became the wife of 
Stephen Stephens, a resident of Cape May 
County, New Jersey, and bore him two chil- 
dren — Sarah and Hosea Moore. Sarah was 
subsequently joined in matrimony with Henry 
Shoures, who afterward became a marine on 
the United States steamship "Pawtuxet," and 
was killed while the vessel was in action. In 
politics Jeremiah Perry supported the Whig 
party. 

William Shull Perry received his education 
in the district schools of Hopewell. He first 
worked for his living in a tobacco warehouse 
at Bridgeton, N.J. Soon after his marriage, 
in early manhood, he purchased the farm con- 
taining eighty-si.x acres, which he has spent 
his life in cultivating, and on which he now 
resitles in retirement. Mr. Perry was joined 
in matrimony with Miss Mary L. Brooks, a 
daughter of Alpheus Brooks, of Greenwich, 
this county, anil has now two children, 
namely: Joseph 15rooks, who now lives on and 
manages the old homestead farm; and Han- 
nah N., who married David .S. Coombs, and 
resides in Hopewell. The mother died in 
1894. Mr. Perry has been somewhat promi- 
nent in local affairs, and has served the 
town as Overseer of Roads and a Trustee of 
the schools. He is highly respected in the 
town. Politically, he is identified with the 



Republican partv- In religious belief he is a 
Baptist, and belongs to the First Baptist 
Church at Bridgeton, of which Mrs. Perry was 
a member until her decease. 




ILL! AM WARREN STEWART, 
the well-known and enterprising 
proprietor of a general store at Greenwich, 
was born here, August 10, 1X52, son of Will- 
iam M. and Elizabeth (Daniels) Stewart. 

William M. Stewart, a son of James Stew- 
art, formerly of Hancock Bridge, Salem 
County, is a native of Alloway's Creek town- 
ship, that county, born November 25, 181 5. 
After receiving his education in the common 
schools, he learned the blacksmith's trade 
with Isaac Nicholson, of Salem, N.J. He 
then went to Philadelphia, and there worked 
as a journeyman for three years. Coming 
back to Greenwich in 1838, he there pur- 
chased two pieces of property on the corner of 
Greenwich and Maple Streets. In -1852 he 
erected the blacksmith's shop that still stands 
on the corner of these streets. He followed 
the blacksmith trade in Greenwich for a num- 
ber of years, and then, on December 16, 1853, 
he opened a general store. This he conducted 
until 1856, when he purchased a farm, known 
as the Providence Ludlam farm, located in 
Hopewell township, and one of the largest 
and finest in the county. He managed the 
property as a general grain farm until i860, 
when he sold it. After that he moved back to 
Greenwich, and purchased another but smaller 
farm, which he manageil until 1870. He then 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



83 



formed a partnership with his son James, 
under the firm name of William M. Stewart & 
Son, and started a general store in a two-story 
frame building, which he erected in 1S70. 
This building stands at the corner of Green- 
wich and Maple Streets, and is now occupied 
by William Warren Stewart. Five years 
later he sold his interest to his son, William 
W., and retired from active life. On Novem- 
ber 27, 1839, he was united in marriage with 
Miss Elizabeth Daniels, a daughter of John 
Daniels, of Alloway's Creek township, Salem 
County. They had three children, two of 
whom, James and William W., are still liv- 
ing. William M. Stewart has been one of the 
most prominent men of his town, and he com- 
mands the respect of all who know him. On 
March 11, 1879, he was elected Freeholder. 
He has served on the Township Committee, 
and has at various times occupied nearly all of 
the local public offices. In religious belief 
and sympathy he and his wife are associated 
with the Society of Friends. 

William Warren Stewart received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Greenwich. 
On leaving school he engaged as a clerk in the 
store of his father and brother. In 1S75 he 
purchased his father's interest in the store, 
which was continued under the style of James 
Stewart & Brother. Four years after, in 
1879, he disposed of his share to his brother, 
and entered into partnership with William S. 
El-well at Cedarville, N.J., the firm being 
known as Elwell & Stewart. After a year 
Mr. Stewart bought the entire business, and 
thereafter conducted it independently until 



April 15, 1884. On this date he removed to 
Sandy Hook, N.J., where he entered the em- 
ploy of the Central Railroad of New Jersey as 
a clerk. He continued with that corporation, 
serving at different stations, until 1892. He 
then returned to Greenwich, bought his brother 
James's business, and has conducted it pros- 
perously to the present time. 

On March i, 1877, Mr. Stewart was united 
in marriage with Miss Jeanette Hartman, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Hartman, 
of Shamong township, Burlington County. 
Of the two children born to them, William 
M. is living. Mr. Stewart ]iarticipates very 
actively in the civil affairs of the community, 
and in the general social gatherings his face 
is familiar. He is associated with the fra- 
ternity of Masons, being a member of Brearly 
Lodge, No. 2, of Bridgeton. He is also iden- 
tified with the Order of Odd Fellows, having 
membership in Welcome Friends Lodge, No. 
48, of Cedarville, of which he is a Past Grand. 
With the Welcome Council, No. 45, Junior, 
in the Order of United American Mechanics 
of Bridgeton, he is likewise in fellowship; 
and he was connected with Tidal Wave Lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Stewart takes 
an active part in national politics, and lends 
his support and advocacy to the principles of 
the Republican party. 



<^»^» 



LMER OGDEN, a member of the firm 
of Ogden & Garrison, milk dealers of 
Bridgeton, was born in Stoc Creek township, 
November 20, 1858, son of Isaac S. and Ann 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Eliza (Bacon) Ogden. Isaac S. Ogden was a 
native of the town of Fairfield, born in No- 
vember, 1 819. He received a common -school 
education, and, when a young man, engaged in 
teaching for a time; but deafness compelled 
him to relinquish pedagogical pursuits. "He 
then bought some land near Shiloh, and fol- 
lowed farming with prosperity for thirty-eight 
years, or until his death, which took place in 
1889. His wife, Ann Eliza, was a daughter 
of Daniel Bacon, of Greenwich. Of her four 
children three lived to maturity, namely: 
Mary J., wife of William N. DuBois, of 
Hopewell; Elmer; and Matilda S., wife of 
Richard Craner, of Anderson, Ind. 

Elmer Ogden was educated in the public 
schools of Hopewell. He was then employed 
in assisting his father upon the farm. After 
his marriage he engaged in farming upon his 
own account, and thus continued until 1892, 
when he moved to Bridgeton, and formed a 
partnership with Walter S. Garrison for the 
purpose of carrying on the milk business. 
The firm of Ogden & Garrison has made 
rapid strides toward prosperity, having at 
the present time a large and profitable busi- 
ness, the natural result of their energy, 
perseverance, and honest dealing. On Jan- 
uary 14, 1885, Mr. Ogden wedded Mary 
J. Curry, daughter of William Curry, of 
Meadville, Pa. ; and of the two children 
born to them a daughter named Cornelia sur- 
vives. 

Mr. Ogden belongs to Eureka Conclave, 
Heptasophs; and he and his wife are members 
of the Pearl Street Baptist Church. 




INFIELD S. BONHAM, an enter- 
prising and practical farmer, own- 
ing a large farm a quarter-mile distant from 
Shiloh post-office in the town of Hopewell, 
was born at a place near his present home on 
April 21, 1850. He is a son of John Smith 
and Margaret T. (Davis) Bonham and a grand- 
son of Charles and Sarah (Bacon) Bonham. 
Charles Bonham was a native of Shiloh, 
where he received a good district-school edu- 
cation. When a young man he taught school 
for several years. Subsequently he carried on 
a farm in Greenwich, this county, for a few 
years, and then held the position of jail-keeper 
in Bridgeton for eleven years. He left the 
jail some time between 1838 and 1840, and 
was thereafter engaged in carpentry. For 
upward of fifteen years he held the office of 
Justice of the Peace. His marriage with Miss 
Sarah Bacon was blessed by the birth of ten 
children, of whom five lived to marry and rear 
families. These were: John Smith, Richard, 
Lydia, Charles, and Hannah. Lydia married 
John Socwell, and Hannah is the wife of John 
Hiscox. The parents attended and supported 
the Seventh Day Baptist church, of which the 
father was a member. 

John Smith Bonham was born in Green- 
wich, April 3, 1823. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Bridgeton, 
whither his parents had removed while he was 
young. After leaving school he worked on a 
farm until he was nineteen, and then went to 
New York City, where he was employed by 
H. C. Douglass for three or four years as bar 
tender. He then returned to Shiloh, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



85 






shortly after engaged in farming. At first he 
purchased a tract of about twenty-five acres. 
He added to this until he had a farm of 
seventy-five acres, which he carries on with 
profit. During the Civil War he served as 
Commissioner of Appeals, and he is now Presi- 
dent of the Shiloh Turnpike Company. When 
a young man he became a member of Cumber- 
land Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. His marriage with Miss Margaret T. 
Davis was performed February 3, 1849. She 
is a daughter of John T. Davis, who was a 
prominent citizen of Hopewell. She has 
borne her husband two sons — • Winfield S. and 
Ephraim D. Both parents are members of the 
Seventh Day Baptist church. 

Winfield S. Bonham received his rudimen- 
tary education in the common schools. He 
prepared for college at the old Shiloh Acad- 
emy, after which he took a three years' course 
at Alfred University of New York, graduating 
in the class of 1872, with the degree of B. S. 
Soon after his graduation Mr. Bonham pur- 
chased his present farm near Shiloh, one of 
the best and largest farms in Hopewell town- 
ship. Here for twenty-three years he has 
been prosperously engaged in general farming. 
He has a fine herd of Jersey cows, whose milk 
he sells to retailers in the city. He is also 
quite extensively engaged in raising horses. 

On August 6, 1873, Mr. Bonham was united 
in marriage with Miss S. Eva Saunders, a 
daughter of Dr. H. P. Saunders, a well-known 
physician of Alfred, N.Y. They have a fam- 
ily of seven children; namely, Josie, Julia, 
Ada, John H., Fannie, Edna, and Clarkson. 



Julia is now at college. The father, who has 
always been a strong Republican, has gener- 
ally been the chairman of the Republican 
meetings held here for several years past. 
He is now serving his second term of three 
years as President of the School Board, one of 
the most responsible offices within the gift of 
the town. While in college he was a member 
of different literary societies. He is a mem- 
ber of Cohansey Lodge, No. 205, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. For the past twenty- 
two years he has been identified with grange 
work. He has been several times Master of 
Hopewell Grange, was a charter member of the 
first grange established here, and has assisted 
in the organization of several in other locali- 
ties. Both he and Mrs. Bonham are influen- 
tial members of the Seventh Day Baptist 
Church of Shiloh and active workers in the 
Sunday-school connected with that cluircli. 



VrAjALLIAM NICE DU BOIS, a pros- 
VpV^ perous farmer and stock raiser liv- 
ing in Lower Hopewell, was born in Canton, 
Salem County, on February 3, 1850, son of 
Solomon and Keziah (Glasjiell) Du Bois. 
The founder of the family, which is of French 
origin, came to this county in the early days, 
and purchased a large tract of land. Richard 
Du Bois, the grandfather of William N., was 
a prominent public man, and owned the exten- 
sive farm midway between Canton and Han- 
cock's Bridge, Salem County, now the prop- 
erty of his son. 

Solomon Du Bois, who was born in Canton 



86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in 1823, lived there until a short time after 
his marriage. He then bought the old home- 
stead in Hopewell township, to which his son 
William has succeeded. He was extensively 
engaged in farming, was highly respected, and 
held several important public offices. His 
wife was a daughter of Edwin Glaspell, and an 
aunt of the Hon. John N. Glaspell. Both 
were members of the Roadstown Baptist 
Church, of which he was a Deacon for many 
years. They had two children — William 
Nice and Ruth Du Bois. The father was ac- 
cidentally killed by a mowing machine, when 
his son William, the subject of this sketch, 
was sixteen years of age. The mother, who 
is still living, resides in Bridgeton, this 
county. 

William Nice Du Bois completed his edu- 
cation in Union Academy at Shiloh, this 
county, a very high grade school, ably. man- 
aged by D. N. Whitford and wife. After his 
father's death he went to Big Foot Prairie, 
Wis. Then he travelled extensively through 
Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois for more than a 
year, sometimes working for wages, but all the 
time observing and gathering experience. 
After his return he managed the farm for his 
mother for two or three years. He bought 
the place when he was about twenty-two years 
old. While Mr. Du Bois keeps out of politi- 
cal entanglements, he votes the Republican 
ticket. Although he still owns and occupies 
the old place, he rents and works a farm of 
one hundred and seventy-five acres in the same 
town, near South Greenwich. Besides being 
one of the most extensive farmers in the vicin- 



ity, he keeps a high class of grade stock, and 
has raised many well-bred horses. In the 
summer he employs two men to assist him and 
his son. 

Mr. Du Bois was married on February 25, 
1874, to Miss Mary J. Ogden, daughter of 
Isaac, a farmer of Shiloh. She was born in 
Shiloh, and like her husband was a student of 
Union Academy. Her grandfather, the Hon. 
Elmer Ogden, who served as Representative 
in the State legislature, was a man of wealth 
and high character. His son, Isaac, the 
father of Mrs. Du Bois, was also a man of 
high respectability and influence. Mr. and 
Mrs. Du Bois have two promising children. 
Their son Mortimer is a pupil of the South 
Jersey Institute. The other child, Verna, is 
also at school. The family attend and sup- 
port the Roadstown Baptist church, of which 
Mrs. Du Bois is a member. 




AMUEL MILLER FOX, farmer and 
land surveyor of Deerfield, N.J., 
who has a beautiful home at Carll's 
Corners, about two miles from the city of 
Bridgeton, was born in Deerfield, February 
21, 1829. He is the son of George and Su- 
sanna (Kandle) Fox, and is descended from 
Revolutionary stock through three lines. His 
great-grandfather, Frederick Fox, who was of 
German birth, settled in Salem County, and 
worketl there for some time as a cooper, mak- 
ing barrels in the pine woods. At the time 
of the Revolutionary troubles he took up arms 
in defence of his adopted country. 




SAMUEL M. FOX. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



89 



His son, Frederick, Jr., the grandfather of 
Samuel Miller, was born March 17, 1768, near 
Friesburg, Salem County, this State, and was 
an early settler in Deerfield, where he bought 
several different farms. An active and ener- 
getic man, he was very successful as a farmer, 
and was also engaged in cutting and sliipping 
lumber to the Philadelphia markets. He was 
a member of the Lutheran Church of Fries- 
burg. His death occurred July 14, 1839. 
His wife, whose name before marriage was 
Anna Mary Meglin, was born November 14, 
1770. Her father, George Meglin, was one 
of the original land-owners in this township, 
his daughter being sole heir of the farm, where 
she lived with her husband during their 
wedded life. Mr. Meglin was in the Revolu- 
tionary army during the terrible winters of 
1777 and 1778. Grandmother F"ox died in 
August, i860. She was the mother of eleven 
children, all of whom attained maturity: 
Mary, wife of Abram Stull; Elizabeth, wife 
of Jacob Hepner; John and Margaret, twins, 
the latter the wife of John Mounts; Frederick; 
Catherine, wife of Lewis Woodruff; George, 
the father above named; Ann, wife of James 
Golder; Lydia, wife of William Keen; and 
Susan, wife of the same gentleman, having 
married him after her sister's death ; and 
Phoebe, who never married. 

George Vox, son of Frederick and Anna 
Mary Fox, was born in Deerfield, August 18, 
1804. He settled after marriage on the farm 
above the F'riendship Church at Finley, and 
there spent the rest of his life. He, too, was 
successfully engaged in farming and lumber- 



ing. He was active in local politics, voting 
in the ranks of the old Democratic party; and 
he served as Assistant Assessor and Collector 
of the township. He died in April, 1889. 
His wife, Susanna, was a native of Pitt's 
Grove, born July 12, 1808. .She was a 
daughter of Adam Kandlc, a farmer of Pitt's 
Grove, and belonged to one of the earliest 
families in this part of the State. Her great- 
grandfather, John Kandle, who was born in 
Germany, and came to this country in the 
Colonial period, bringing with him his son 
Henry, died in Philadelphia. Henry Kandle, 
Mrs. Fox's grandfather, was one of the pio- 
neers of this part of the State of New Jersey. 
He purchased a large tract of new land in the 
vicinity of Elmer and Willow Grove, and 
spent his life there. He, too, was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary army. Mrs. Susanna 
Kandle Fox died in January, 1890. She and 
her husband were members of the Methodist 
Protestant church near Finley, Mr. Fox, who 
was one of the strong men of the church, 
being a member of the Board of Trustees. 
This couple reared seven children, namely: 
Samuel Miller, whose name appears at the 
head of this article; Adam, also a resident 
of Deerfield; George, a farmer, who died in 
1865; Enoch, a farmer of Deerfield; Anna 
Mary, widow of James Duffield, of Elmer; 
Charles F., of Deerfield; and lunily Jane, 
wife of Edward Secley, of Bridgcton. 

Samuel Miller F"ox acquired his education 
in a country school, learning there, besides 
the primary branches, the higher matliematics 
and the theory of land surveying. When he 



9° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was eighteen years of age he went to live with 
his grandmother Fox; and for three years he 
was alternately engaged in teaching and farm- 
ing, having charge of his grandmother's farm. 
He spent two years at Camden, learning car- 
pentry and cabinet-making, and afterward 
worked for some time at his trade in his na- 
tive town. He lived in the vicinit)' of the 
old farm until the spring of 185S, when he 
moved to his present homestead, which he had 
purchased. His place at first comprised fifty- 
one acres, and he subsequently added to it forty- 
nine acres more. He also owns another farm 
nearer the city, on which he has erected new 
buildings. Here since 1858 he has been 
successfully engaged in general farming and 
in surveying. As a surveyor he has accom- 
plished a great amount of work in this and 
.Salem County, and there are very few farms 
in the vicinity whose boundaries he has not 
established. He liid the surveying for the 
town of Rosenhayn when it was purchased, and 
was afterward called to correct the errors made 
by another surveyor in laying out the roads. 
At the present time Mr. Fox is the oldest 
practical surveyor in this part of the country. 

On December 6, 1S55, he was married to 
I'iuth C, daughter of Enoch and Lydia (Cor- 
nell) Garrison, both members of old New 
Jersey families. Mrs. Fox was born January 
24, 1837, and died April 12, 1891. She was 
the mother of five children — Maggie, wife of 
Daniel 'D. Coney, of Deerfield, who has two 
children — Lydia and Ada; Albert K., at I-os 
Angeles, Cal., who married Miss Jennie 
Sayre, and has three children — Samuel, Ma- 



tilda, and Sarah; Sarah, wife of Chester F. 
Garton, of Deerfield; Lydia G., who is with 
her father; and George, in Philadelphia, who 
married Miss Ida L. Young, and has one son, 
Percival. 

Mr. Fox has been for many years actively 
connected with the affairs of the township. 
He was Township Committee during the 
war, when recruiting men and arranging 
bounties made the office no sinecure, and 
was also Assessor in war time, accomplish- 
ing a great work; for it was voted to pay off 
all the expenses, and when the war was 
over the town was clear of debt. Mr. Fox 
was Assessor three or four years, and then 
was elected Collector, an office he held four 
years. Then, after an interval of three years, 
he was again elected, and was in office twelve 
or thirteen years, till 1888, the longest term 
on record for that office. He was a Freeholder 
of the township for a number of years, and in 
1884 was nominated for the Assembly, but 
failed of election, as it was a Presidential 
year, and the opposition majority was unusually 
large. Mr. Fox has also acted as delegate to 
a number of conventions. In religious belief 
he is a Methodist, and attendeil for some time 
the Methodist Episcopal churcli at Wood- 
ruff, of which his wife was a member. He 
now attends the church at F"riendship. 



ZARIAH MORE, of the Jefferis Glass 
Works of I<"airton, was born at the old 
homestead at Harmon)-, Hopewell 
township, this county, November 19, i860. 




BIOGRAPHICAL RFAaKW 



91 



His father, the Hon. Robert More, owned the 
family place where Azariah was born, and 
where he lived until he was about eighteen 
years old. The subject of this article attended 
the common schools of the vicinity in his boy- 
hood, and afterward completed a course at the 
South Jersey Institute in Bridgeton, N.J. 
Upon leaving school Mr. More found employ- 
ment in his father's mill at Seeley, this 
county, where he remained for a year. Mis 
next position was with More-Jonas Glass Com- 
pany, where he worked for five years serving 
apprenticeship to the trade of glass blower on 
bottles. He was next engaged in the grocery 
business in Bridgeton for four years, also hold- 
ing the agency of the Overlook Cemetery Com- 
pany. Mr. More sold the first burial lot in 
this beautiful spot, and during the first year 
of his agency made out more than one hun- 
dred deeds for purchasers. As long as he re- 
mained in Bridgeton he was connected with 
this company, and it may be assumed that 
much of the success of the enterprise was due 
to his faithful services. Overlook Cemetery 
is now justly considered the most attractive 
and beautiful burial-place in South Jersey. 
His store was on the corner of Bank and Irv- 
ing Streets, where he carried on a successful 
business. 

Mr. More sold his grocery store in Bridge- 
ton, and entered into a partnership with the 
Willis-More Glass Company. This connec- 
tion was formed in February, 1892, the part- 
ners, all men of influence, buying the land, 
and themselves building up the factory. 
Though so recently established, these exten- 



sive works have already gained a national 
reputation for the uniform superiority and reli- 
ability of the wares they produce, which in- 
clude green and amber bottles. The factory 
greatly increases the financial and industrial 
importance of Fairton. Its trade extends to 
New York, Boston, St. Louis, Salt Lake 
City, and all parts of the United States. It 
covers three acres of ground, and is furnished 
with all the latest appliances known to the 
trade. Three furnaces are in operation, two 
during the day and one during the night. 
An average force of one hundred workmen are 
employed in the different departments. The 
facilities are such that the largest orders can 
be filled promptly and satisfactorily on the 
shortest notice. Special sidings from the 
railroad render the shipping capacities practi- 
cally unlimited, while the daily output is 
about twelve tons. The officers of the com- 
pany were: Philip Stathem, President; Fur- 
man R. Willis, Vice-President and Treasurer; 
and Azariah More, Secretary anil General 
Superintendent. In the spring of ICS96 the 
company was reorganized and incorporated 
under the style of the Jefferis Glass Works 
with a branch office in the Bourse Building, 
Philadelphia. Under the new regime, Mr. 
More and Samuel U. Beckett manage the 
works. 

On August i<S, 1885, he was wedded to 
Miss Laura F. Whitaker, a native of Bridge- 
ton and a daughter of Ebcnezer and Caroline 
(Hines) Whitaker. Mr. Whitaker is a well- 
known resident of this county, having been for 
three years Sheriff of Cumberland and for 



92 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



eleven years the steward of the almshouse. 
Mr. More's only child, Carrie W. More, pos- 
sesses rare musical gifts. Her parents have 
given her the best training possible, and are 
proud of the results. At the age of seven 
years the little lady led the grand march in a 
I)iano recital held at Bridgeton, in which sixty 
scholars took part. She has, no doubt, a brill- 
iant career before her. Mr. More is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church of Fairton, of 
which he was made Trustee soon after moving 
to that town. Though he has never been an 
aspirant to any political office, he has been a 
very faithful and steadfast adherent of the Re- 
publican party. He takes a deep interest in 
educational affairs. When the new school law 
went into effect, placing all the districts of a 
township under one board, he was elected a 
member of the first School Board in his town, 
and at its formal organization was made its 
I'resident. He has also been elected District 
Clerk each succeeding year up to the present 
time. Fairfield may certainly claim him as 
one of its benefactors. Mr. More is a member 
of Colantha Lodge, Knights of Pythias, in 
Bridgeton, and is a charter member of the 
Knights of the Golden Fagle in the same 
town, having been one of its first officers. 
He is Past Noble Chief in the order, and is a 
member of the Grand Castle of the State. 



NDRKW WILLIAM BENNETT, fore- 
man in the glass works of Whitall 
Tatum & Co., Millville, and mem- 
ber of Millville City Council, was born in 




Honesdale, Wayne County, Pa., ' February 6, 
1858. He is a son of Henry and Honora 
(Sullivan) Bennett and a grandson of Andrew 
Bennett. Andrew Bennett, who was a native 
of Winslow, N.J., spent the greater part of 
his life in that place, engaged in charcoal 
burning. Ten years before his death he re- 
tired from active business. He married Eliz- 
abeth Watson, daughter of Josiah Watson. 

Henry Bennett, born July 4, 1832, in Ber- 
lin, N.J., after receiving his education in the 
common schools, learned pot-making in a 
glass factory, and worked at that industry for 
the rest of his lifetime. He came to Millville 
in 1868, and, entering the employment of 
Whitall Tatum & Co., was engaged there 
nearly up to the time of his death, which oc- 
curred February 12, 1870. His wife was a 
daughter of William ■ Sullivan, a native of 
County Kerry, Ireland. They were married 
in Honesdale, Pa., in 1853, and have had nine 
children, eight of whom reached maturity; 
namely, Mary E., Sarah A., Andrew W., 
Henry P., Charles M., Evin J., Albert T., 
and Louisa I. Mary E. is the wife of Will- 
iam Pennington, of Millville; Sarah A. mar- 
ried Frank Haggerty, of Millville; and 
Louisa I. is now Mrs. Gilbert Adams, of Bur- 
lington, N.J. 

Andrew William Bennett was educated 
chiefly in the common schools of Oswego 
County, New York, where his parents resided 
for four years. When of a proper age he was 
taught the trade of glass blowing. In the 
course of time he became a skilful workman, 
and earned a good salary. He had worked at 



BIOGRAPHICAL RF^VIEW 



93 



this trade for sixteen years in the factory of 
Wliitall Tatuni & Co., when, in 1893, he was 
made foreman of the night tanl<, in which ca- 
pacity he is at present employed. In 1887, 
April 9, Mr. Bennett was united in matrimony 
with Roxanna Beebe, daughter of Edward 
Beeiie, of Millville. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Presbyterian church. In 
1893 he was elected to represent Ward 4 in 
the City Council for a term of three years. 
In this capacity he is serving on the Public 
Buildings Committee and the Sanitary Com- 
mittee, and is Chairman of the Committee on 
Electric Lighting. He is a member of She- 
kinah Lodge, A. E. & A. M., of Millville, 
Richman Chapter and Olivet Commandery; 
of Millville Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
I'"ellovvs; and of Ivanhoe Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias. 



^■♦••■»- 



T^TTENRY M. DARE, a general merchant 
and dealer in coal, phosphate, and 
fertilizers at Rosenhayn, Decrficld 
township, was horn August 24, 1849, at Pitt's 
Grove, Monroeville, Salem County, N.J., son 
of James A. and Sarah (Dickinson) Dare. 
James A. Dare first saw the light in a log 
cabin on the same farm in 1812. Here he 
grew up, and became a prominent and success- 
ful business man, owning in the course of 
time a part of his father's farm and fifty acres 
adjoining, upon which he built a house of 
more generous dimensions than the one in 
which his existence had begun. In addition 
to his farming he was also a local preacher of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. During the 



time that the Rev. Dr. Wiiitacar was Presid- 
ing Elder of this section of the diocese, he 
was persuaded to devote himself more fully to 
the ministry. For the last twenty years of 
his life he was an ardent church worker, driv- 
ing twenty miles on .Sunday morning to give 
the gospel to a congregation whicli had no 
other means of obtaining it. The unselfish- 
ness of this labor of love could only be appre- 
ciated by those who profited by it; but, when 
it is considered that he received no remunera- 
tion for his services, the character of the man 
stands out in bold relief as that of one whose 
life is the best exponent of his creed. Be- 
sides being a man of deep piety, James A. 
Dare possessed a great deal of practical knowl- 
edge, and was, moreover, a man of education. 
During the early years of his married life he 
taught the winter school, but naturally gave 
up this branch of work as other responsibili- 
ties devolved upon him. I^ght of his chil- 
dren reached adult life, namely: Eliza, now 
Mrs. William .S. Garrison; John, who lives 
at Monroeville, ami is unmarried; Joseph, of 
whom there is no special record; Harriet A., 
now deceased, who w;is the wife of Thomas W. 
Newkirk; Hannah, the wife of James Garri- 
son; Henry M., of whom this is a brief biog- 
raphy; Anna, who married Daniel C. Strong; 
and James, a resident of Clayton, Gloucester 
County. Both parents have passed to tlieir 
account, the father, March 17, 1864, and the 
mother in March of 1893. 

Henry M. Dare was a young lad when 
death deprived him of his father. His 
mother kept her children together until Henry 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was in his fifteenth year. He then sought 
and secured employment on a neighboring 
farm, and thereafter continued at farm work 
until he was twenty. He now learned the 
turner's trade in the Chestnut Island Mills, 
near Monroe, where he worked for two years. 
At the expiration of that period he was em- 
ployed in the I'arvins Mills for more than two 
years, after which he took charge of the Broad- 
way Mills. VViien he gave up the latter posi- 
tion he entered into partnership with James 
D. Gruff, in the purchase of a threshing ma- 
chine, which he profitably ran for three. years 
in Piles Grove township. Buying out his part- 
ner's interest in the machine then, he contin- 
ued alone for another year. 

After his marriage Mr. Dare became a 
farmer at Richmond Mills, Salem County, re- 
maining there four years, at the end of which 
time he sold out, and removed to Rosenhayn. 
Here he lived for two years on the corner of 
Bridgeton and Morton Avenues, caring for a 
little farm he owned to make it salable. His 
judgment proved sound: for he found a pur- 
chaser, and was enabled by its sale to buy the 
property he now occupies. lie also owned ten 
acres of land besides at this time. Few 
houses had been llicn erected in Rosenhayn, 
and Mr. Dare had no residence there as yet. 
He was Chairman of a Building Committee 
appointed to erect a church. The outlook for 
the embyro town was discouraging; but be 
went ahead, built his house and store, and 
soon after started a general merchandise 
business that was a success from the begin- 
ning. Within the last ten years he has added 



coal and fertilizers to his stock with advan- 
tage. He has wisely retained the ten acres 
of land purchased before building began on 
the town site, and it is now in the heart of 
the fast-growing city. Only three lots of the 
original tract have been disposed of, so that 
there still remains a valuable property. Mr. 
Dare also does an extensive business as a 
shipper of the produce which the farmers of 
the vicinity rely on Jiim to [dace on the, mar- 
kets. One of the largest business ventures 
in Rosenhayn is its brick factory, in which 
Mr. Dare is largely interested. This factory 
turns out from twelve thousand to fifteen 
thousand bricks daily, usually the latter num- 
ber. The bricks, which are of a fine quality, 
are side-cut with wire and red and buff in color. 
The Cottage for the Feeble-minded at Vine- 
land, built of these bricks, shows them to ad- 
vantage. The Rosenhayn bricks are sliipped 
to Boston, the best quality fetching a price of 
twenty-eight dollars per thousand. 

On February 20, 187S, Mr. Dare married 
Electra H. Hanthorne, of Broadway Station. 
She was a daughter of Lsaac Hanthorne, an old 
and esteemed resident of the county. Mr. 
Dare has inherited liis father's piety and re\'- 
crcnce for religion, lie is a memlicr of the 
Methodist Fpiscopal church, and is an ardent 
worker in its behalf. For five years he has 
been the Sunday-school superintendent, and, 
since coming to Rosenhayn, has been a liberal 
supporter of the denomination to which lie 
belongs. The various interests of Rosenhayn 
have been encouraged by him to the utmost, 
and much of the town's prosperity is due to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



95 



his efforts. He was a charter member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Victory Lodge, No. 137, 
of Rosenhayn. He has been a Justice of the 
Peace since March, 1895. 



c* 



iLARENCE MULFORD DUBOIS, 
City Surveyor, Justice of the Peace, 
and Notary Public of Bridgeton, was 
born in this city. May 8, 1863, son of. Will- 
iam S. and Sarah (Williams) Dubois. His 
paternal grandfather was William S. Dubois, 
born in Pitt's Grove township. William S. 
Dubois, father of Clarence M., was also a na- 
tive of Bridgeton, born September 16, 181 7. 
Having attended the common schools of the 
city for the usual period, he learned the black- 
smith's trade. In 1841 he went to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where until 1S63, besides work- 
ing at his trade, he kept a temperance hotel. 
He then returned to Bridgeton, and carried on 
a successful business for about nine years as 
a dealer in woollen goods and yarns. After 
this he was employed by the East Lake 
Woollen Manufacturing Company until two 
years before his death, when the bad condi- 
tion of his health obliged him to withdraw 
from all active occupation. He died March 
20, 1886. His marriage took place in F"ebru- 
ary, 1841. His wife, Sarah, was a daughter 
of Joseph Williams, of Cincinnati, and she 
bore her husband seven children; namely, 
William T., Harriet, Joseph W. , Francis T., 
Lorenzo M., Mary Alice, and Clarence M. 
Mary Alice died at the age of eighteen. Har- 
riet is the wife of David P. Mulford. Both 



the father and mother were members of the 
Commerce Street Methodist Episcopal Church, 
while the father had the further relation of 
serving on the official board of the society. 

Clarence Mulford Dubois received his early 
education in the common schools of his native 
town. His first efforts at working for a living 
were made in a woollen-mil]. After spending 
two years in this employment he entered 
Rutgers College, New ]5runswick, N.J., com- 
pleted the scientific course, and graduated in 
the class of 1S86. Immediately after he (jb- 
tained a short engagement in connection with 
the Geological Survey of New Jersey. He 
was ne.\t employed for three years as assistant 
engineer on the engineer corps of the Pennsyl- 
vania, Slatington & New England Railroad. 
Later the Baltimore & Drum Point Railroatl 
engaged his services in a similar capacity for 
some time. The work done by him for tlic two 
railroads and the government was so satisfac- 
tory as to make a reputation for him. The 
consequence was that in May, 1890, he was 
appointed by the Common Council to the 
office of City .Survc)or of Bridgeton, wliich 
position he has since held. The Common 
Council in May, 1896, also placed him in 
charge of the streets and roads of the city ol 
Bridgeton, with the title of Supervisor, he 
being the first person to hold that position. 

On February 27, 1S89, Mr. Dubois was 
united in matrimony with Miss Nettie E. A. 
Cole, daughter of Thomas C. Cole, of New 
Brunswick. Their children are: Louis S., 
Frank W., and David M. ]?oth parents at- 
tend the Methodist Episcopal church on Com- 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



merce Street, the father being- a member. 
He is also a member of Immortelle Command - 
ery, No. 138, Knights of Malta. He has the 
sincere esteem of the people of Bridgeton. 



(shames EWAN, a respected resident of 
b' in ley Station, was born in Millville, 
July 15, 1S33, son of Israel and Mary 
(Hunter) Ewan. Mr. Ewan's grandfather, 
Evan Ewan, settled in Atlantic County when 
that entire region was a wilderness. Here he 
built a mill, and engaged in the business of 
supplying lumber to those pioneers who, like 
himself, were estal)lishing homes in the 
"forest primeval." As the country became 
populated, his trade increased proportionately, 
until he had acquired quite a fortune, and was 
able to indulge his ta.ste for hunting. The 
op[iortunities for this pastime were almost un- 
limited, and ICvan Ewan's prowess as a Nim- 
rod was heard of far and near. It is alleged 
that three hundred deer fell by his rifle. His 
skill as a marksman was a household word in 
the homes of the Atlantic County settlers. 
He afterw.ird left Atlantic, and moved to the 
vicinage of Millville, where he settled upon 
a farm three miles east of the town. Here he 
spent the rest of his life, and died in his 
eighty-third year. Evan Ewan was a brother 
of Israel Ewan, who was the founder of the 
luvan family in America. One branch, estab- 
lished in the West, spelled the name lowing 
instead of Ewan, probably for the reason that 
both the northern and western Ewings and 
Ewans were supposed to have a common de- 



scent from Scottish ancestry. Israel Ewan, 
the father of James, was born in Atlantic 
County, not far from a town or village known 
at that time as Petty Pot Mills. At twelve 
years of age he came to Millville, where he 
grew up and was educated. Here he was a 
farmer for some time before he finally moved 
to Bridgeton, this county, where he died. 
He married Miss Mary 1 lunter, of Millville, 
who died, leaving the subject of this sketch, 
an infant of two years of age, and a daughter, 
Sarah, now deceased. 

James Ewan, the motherless child, though 
bereft of that earliest and purest love for 
which nothing in life is compensation, did 
not lack good training. He attended good 
private as well as public schools, and then en- 
tered the factory of Mr. Lewis Mulford, the 
well-known manufacturer of window glass, 
where he was employed four or five years. 
He then began to learn the blacksmith's trade 
under William D. Wilson, of Millville. 
After serving a year with Mr. Wilson, he 
finished his apprenticeship under George S. 
Pearson, of Bridgeton. Mr. Ewan remained 
in Mr. Pearson's employment until he left the 
place to try his fortunes in Dixon, 111. The 
financial pressure of 1857 recalled him to his 
native county; and shortly after his return he 
opened a smith's shop on a jaart of Laurel 
Street, now the site of the clothing store of 
the late P. II. Goldsmith, in the very heart of 
the city. When the war of the Rebellion 
broke up the peace and prosperity of the 
Union, he enlisted in Company H of the 
Twenty-fourth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



97 



and in 1S62 was sent to Washington. At the 
bloody battle of Fredericksburg he first wit- 
nessed the horrors of war. He also partici- 
pated in the engagement at Chancellorsville. 
The company's period of service expired just 
before the battle of Gettysburg was fought, 
when Mr. Ewan returned home and engaged in 
the business of bending pipes for blast fur- 
naces. He furnished these blast pipes to many 
prominent firms in Philadelphia and in other 
parts of Pennsylvania. After a time he also 
manufactured coils for ice machines, and be- 
came prominent in his line of work. Until 
1S70 he remained in IJridgeton, when he pur- 
chased a farm of fifteen acres in the vicinity of 
the town. To this he has added by different 
purchases, so that its present boundaries en- 
close eighty acres. This farm is considered 
one of the best and most desirable in the neigh- 
borhood. It has proved most valuable since 
its owner devoted a part of it to the culture of 
strawberries. Mr. Ewan gives his personal at- 
tention to the improvement of his estate, a fact 
which, probably, is the secret of his success. 
In 1859 ^I''- Kwan married Miss lilizabeth 
Gandy, a daughter of Miles Gandy, who was 
lost at sea in his youth. A native of Beas- 
ley's Point, Cape May County, she afterward 
became a resident of Newport, this county. 
The marriage was blessed by the birth of ten 
ciiildren, nine of whom are now living. 
These are: Mary, the wife of P'rederick Fritz, 
of Denver, Col.; William Seward, residing 
in Philadelphia; Ida, the wife of Milford 
Appelgate, of Bridgeton ; Sarah, who married 
Mr. John Andofer, of the same city; Horace 



Greely, of Philadelphia; Flora, who is unmar- 
ried; Charles, a resident of Philadelphia; 
Abigail; and James Blaine l^wan. Samuel, 
who was a business man of Philadelphia, is 
deceased. The mother died March 20, 1S88. 
The father rendered good service to the com- 
munity on the committees of the township. A 
loyal Republican in a Democratic stronghold, 
he has been a delegate to several different 
State conventions. The Ewan family attend 
the Methodist Episcopal church in Woodruff, 
this county. They have the sincere esteem 
of their neighbors. 



« * • * » 



M 



AVID Rl':i':S STREETS, M.D., a 
^ m prominent medical practitioner of 
Bridgeton, was born August 3, 1856, 
in Smyrna, Kent County, Del., son of lulward 
and Mary E. (Griffin) Streets. His earliest 
known paternal ancestor was Jacob Streets, of 
St. George's Hundred, New Castle County, 
Del., who married about 1781 lilizabeth 
Harmon, a lady of German descent. Jacol) 
Streets, the second son, and father oi luhvard 
Streets, was a soldier in liie War of 1S12. 
He married Matilda Hale, daughter of Thomas 
Hale, of Duck Creek Cross-roads (now 
Smyrna), and died shortly after the close of 
the war. Thomas Hale's name appears among 
those of persons assessed in Duck Creek Hun- 
dred in 1785. In 1 79 1 he was one of the 
three Deputy Postmasters in Delaware; and, 
when the State legislature met in that town in 
1792, it convened at Fisher's Hotel (now 
Smyrna Hotel), kept by Thomas Hale. 



■98 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Edward Streets, born in Smyrna, in Sep- 
tember, 1S14, was a farmer and bricklayer, 
and spent most of his life in his native place. 
He married Mary lilizabeth Griffin, and they 
had six sons, four of whom are now living, 
namely: Dr. David R. Streets, the subject of 
this sketch; Dr. Jacob Griffin Streets, a phy- 
sician of Bridgeton ; Dr. Thomas Hale 
Streets, a surgeon in the United States Navy; 
and Edward Streets, a farmer living in Kent 
County, Delaware. The father, who was orig- 
inally an Episcopalian, and the mother, who 
was a Haptist, joined the Presbyterian church 
from motives of convenience. Mr. Streets 
died on September 3, 18S2. His wife, who 
was born December 25, 18 19, died on Decem- 
ber 13, 1 88 1. She was a descendant of Sam- 
uel Griffith and John Rees, Welshmen who 
settled in Duck Creek Hundred, respectively 
in 1733 and 1747. The name Griffith became 
Griffin in the third generation. David Rees 
Streets is the sixth in descent from Samuel 
Griffith (first), who died in 1769, and his 
wife, Martha, through .Samuel (second), John, 
Jacob Rothram, and Mary Elizabeth (Griffin) 
Streets; and he is of the fifth generation from 
John Rees, who died in 1769, and his wife, 
Hester, through David, Susan, and Mary E. 
(Griffin) Streets. Two branches of the Rees 
blood of the second generation — that of Mary, 
who married Samuel Griffith (second), and 
that of David, her brother — united in his 
mother. Dr. Streets is also allied to the 
Spruances through his great-grandmother, 
Jemima Spruance, sister of Presley .Spruance 
and wife of David Rees. 



David Rees Streets, M.D., after receiving 
his early education in his native town, took 
courses of study at West Jersey Academy and 
South Jersey Institute, graduating from the 
latter institution in 1S76. During the year 
preceding this event he taught school in the 
vicinity of Smyrna, and during the year suc- 
ceeding it at Woodruff's school-house, near 
Bridgeton. He then, in 1877, entered the 
medical department of the University of 
Pennsylvania, where, after completing a three 
years' course, he graduated in March, 1880. 
In October of the same year he was admitted 
to Hahnemann Medical College of the same 
city, from which he was graduated in March, 
1 88 1. Dr. Streets then located in Bridgeton, 
where he has since continuously followed his 
profession, having a fine and lucrative posi- 
tion. He conforms to no school of medicine, 
is extremely liberal in his views, and has a 
large and lucrative practice. 

He was for many years a member of the Re- 
publican party. In 1892 he joined the 
People's party, the principles of which he has 
since actively supported. Dr. Streets has 
been nominatetl by the party once for Cor- 
oner and once for Collector. He has served 
as a county delegate in several conventions, 
and he is a member of the People's County 
Committee. He was a member of the Board 
of Education from the Second Ward in 1884. 
He is now a member at large of the Bridgeton 
Board of Health. 

On October 2, 1884, he was married to 
Carrie K. Carll, daughter of Robert Bruce and 
Elizabeth P. (Rose) Carll, of this city. Her 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



99 



father was a contractor and builder, and was 
l)rominent in the Masonic Order. Dr. and 
Mrs. David Rees Streets iiave three children 
— Dorothy, Mary, and Caril Rees. They at- 
tend the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. 
Streets is a valued member. Since 1S90 they 
have resided at their fine house, corner of 
Commerce and Walnut Streets. 



(sTrONATHAN SHEPHERD AVARS, of 
Roadstown, an industrious blacksmith 
and the Collector of Hopewell town- 
ship, was born in Greenwich, Cumberland 
County, September 22, 1S40, son of I'Iphraim 
and Sarah (Garrison) Ayars. The father, who 
was probably a native of Salem County, 
learned the blacksmith trade in Greenwich. 
After working there as a journeyman for some 
time he came to Roadstown, built a shop, and 
established himself in business just across the 
road from where his son Jonathan now resides. 
He bought the adjoining land and soon after 
the ]iroperty now owned by Jtmathan. He 
carried on his shop until he was well advanced 
in years, and then went to live with his son on 
the farm, where he spent the rest of his life. 
In politics he was an ardent supporter of the 
Democratic party. He married Miss Sarah, 
daughter of Thompson Garrison, of Stoe 
Creek township. (See the sketch of W. O. 
Garrison for an account of her ancestry. ) She 
had four children, of whom Ephraim G., who 
owns a farm in this township, is living in 
Sceley, this county. Two died, aged respec- 
tively ten and twelve years. Both parents 



gave their religious preference to the Presby- 
terian Church of (Ireenwich. The father died 
in 1S.S8, and the mother in 1893. 

Jonathan Shepherd Ayars, after attending 
school in Roadstown, where he had lived since 
he was a baby, went to Shiloh to continue his 
education at a select school. Having grown 
up with his father's business, he naturally ac- 
quired the trade; and, on attaining his ma- 
jority, he took an Interest in the shop, 
which was thereafter conducted under the 
name of Ayars & Son. The shop was after- 
ward sold out; and Jonathan became a commis- 
sion merchant, handling all kinds of produce 
on the steamboat plying between (ireenwich 
and Philadelphia. Later he bought back the 
blacksmith shop, and has since conducted it, 
giving employment to a number of men. Like 
his father, Mr. Ayars is a Democrat, and 
takes an active interest in ]iolitics. He was 
first elected Inspector of Elections; and he has 
held the office of Town Collector for the past 
nineteen years, having one year to finish the 
unexpired term. In the beginning, when the 
occupant was elected annually, this office was 
strongly contested. The term of office has 
since been extended to tliree years. At pres- 
ent the average collection amounts to from 
ten to eleven thousand dollars. Mr. Ayars is 
a member of Calanthe Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, of Bridgeton. 

On December 31, 1863, he was married to 
Miss Kate Shropshire, of Bricksburg, a daugh- 
ter of Henderson Shropshire. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ayars are the parents of two children — Alice, 
the wife of Henry N. Switzer, of Salem ; and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Alonzo Van Dusen. The father is a supporter 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
Mrs. Ayars i*s a member. Mr. Ayars served 
it efficiently as Trustee for many years. 




HOMAS B. WELCH, M.D., the founder 
of the Welch Grape Juice Company of 
Vineland, N.J., was born at Glastonbury, 
Somersetshire, England, December 31, 1825, 
his parents being Abraham and Mary Fussel 
Welch. 

Abraham Welch was a native of Glaston- 
bury, and was for many years there engaged 
as a merchant. Later he followed the same 
pursuit in London, until he emigrated to the 
United States in 1834. He established him- 
self in business at Watertown, N.Y. , where 
he remained till nearly the time of his death, 
which occurred in Winona, Minn. He had 
a family of fourteen children, three of whom 
died in infancy, and eleven grew to ma- 
turity. Of these may be named the follow- 
ing: Robert, who was a resident of Water- 
town, N.Y. ; Mary Ann, who became Mrs. 
Hughes, and is now deceased; Alfred, for- 
merly a clergyman and now a dentist of 
Minneapolis, Minn. ; Sarali, deceased, who 
was the wife of Mr. Kannister, of Watertown, 
N.Y.; Susan, who is the wife of Phineas 
I'eck, of Vineland, and who has spent much 
time as a successful evangelist among chil- 
dren; Dr. Thomas B. ; Abraham, Jr., now de- 
ceased; Priscilln, the wife of the Rev. H. P. 
Sheldon, a Methodist minister of California, 
with whom she was unitetl in marriatre in 



i860; and Addie Horton, now wife of John 
Hoxie, of Boston, Mass. Abraham Welch, 
the father, was a highly respected local 
preacher in the Methodist I'^piscopal church. 

Thomas B. Welch, to whom this sketch prin- 
cipally relates, received his early education 
in the public schools of Watertown, N. Y. He 
also pursued a course at the Gouverneur Wes- 
leyan Seminary, where he was graduated; and 
at the age of nineteen he entered on the 
work of the gospel ministry in connection 
with the Wesleyan Methodist church, locat- 
ing first at Poundridge, near New York City. 
His next charge was in Herkimer County, 
New York; and while there he was united in 
marriage with Miss Lucy Hutt, of Gouver- 
neur, N.Y. He continued in the work of 
the ministry until his voice failed him. and 
he was obliged to direct his attention to other 
pursuits. 

Deciding to enter the medical profession, 
he matriculated at the New York Central Med- 
ical College, where, com|)leting the regular 
course, he was graduated in his twenty-sixth 
year. He then immediately established him- 
self at Penn Yan, N.Y., and continued in 
practice there for two years. But, not being 
very strong physically, and finding the re- 
quirements of his calling too large and exact- 
ing for his constitution, he, having jiaid con- 
siderable attention to dentistry, concluded to 
follow that pursuit. He went to Winona, 
Minn., in 1856, locating there as one of the 
early dentists, before the State of Minnesota 
was admitted to the Union. He practised at 
Winona for some years, and then removed Xo 




THOMAS B^ WELCH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'03 



New York City, where he resided one year, 
whence he came to Vineland, N.J., in 1865, 
when it was a small village. He followed 
his profession in Vineland until 1880, and 
enjoyed a very successful and lucrative practice 
through the entire time. 

In 1869 Dr. Welch originated a method of 
preserving wine in an unfermented state, 
especially for church communion services. 
This was an entirely new idea, and it involved 
a departure from an old custom and the initia- 
tion of a new practice. Much time, jjatience, 
and money were required to introduce it into 
the churches; but it has finally become the es- 
tablished wine for communion. Before leav- 
ing his practice in dentistry he had prepared 
this wine and had introduced it on a small 
scale into the neighboring churches. The 
Welch grape juice was originally prepared and 
intended sim])l\- for local use; but gradually 
the demands for it became more than local, 
and the preparation of it necessarily assumed 
the form of a business. The industry grew 
slowly till i8go, since which time Dr. Welch 
has devoted to it his exclusive attention, and it 
has assumed vast proportions. The demands 
have doubled every year, as it is now exten- 
sively used by physicians in their practice, in 
fountains, and for social gatherings. Dr. 
Welch has built up a business that extends all 
over the country. In the year 1892-93 he 
erected a large, three-story, steel-faced build- 
ing, with a vault seventy-five by fifty-two feet 
in dimensions, which is used as a storehouse 
for the product. This year, 1895-96, he is 
also establishing a large plant at Watkins, 



N.Y., the main building of which is thirty-five 
by eighty-two feet, and has three stories. It 
has the advantage of both railroad and steam- 
boat connections, there being landings for both 
cars and boats at the door. It has been found 
during years of experience that the grape 
product of that vicinity is especially well 
adapted to tonic and medicinal purposes. I'ov 
years many carloads of grapes have been 
received in Vineland from that locality. 
The Welch Grape Juice Company is to-day 
the principal manufacturing establishment of 
unfermented wine in this country, and last 
year it produced eighty thou.sand gallons. 
The company had an exhibit at the Columbian 
Exposition. 

After Dr. Welch discontinued his practice 
in dentistry, he established in 1881, under the 
firm name of T. B. Welch & Son, a dental 
depot at 141 3 Filbert Street, Philadelphia. 
It was afterward incorporated as the Wilming- 
ton Dental Manufacturing Company, develop- 
ing into one of the largest dental depots in 
the United States, with a capital of six hun- 
dred thousand dollars. Of this his son 
Charles was for many years the manager. 
Dr. T. B. Welch is also still connected in- 
timately with the depot, especially in the sale 
of his dental specialties and in the editorial de- 
partment of the Items of Interest, now Welch' s 
Mont/ily. These things, with the grajie juice 
manufactory, make a busy man of him, though 
now more than seventy years of age. His 
magazine, which he at first published alone at 
Vineland, and of which he has always been 
the editor, is probably the most popular dental 



I04 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



journal in the United States. It has a very 
extensive circulation. 

Dr. Welch has been twice married. His 
first wife, Mrs. Lucy Hutt Welch, became the 
mother of seven children, namely: George, 
who is now a successful dentist of Washing- 
ton, D.C.; Fred, also a dentist, at Morris- 
town, N.J.; Charles E. , formerly a dentist, 
now the manager of the grape juice business; 
Emma, who practises dentistry at Vineland, 
and who is the wife of Dr. Slade, also a den- 
tist; Clara, now the wife of M. D. Gould, of 
Moore, Pa. ; Arvilla, wife of Professor Harvey 
Murray, of Portland, Me., a very successful 
musician; May, the wife of Dr. John Thomas, 
of Gynwyd, Pa. 

Dr. Welch is a very stanch and active tem- 
perance man. When he came to Vineland he 
found no less than a dozen places where 
liquors could be bought, though the town was 
nominally a temperance stronghold. He in- 
stituted a fight against the trafific, organizing 
a league, in which he acted as the prosecutor, 
and succeeded in forcing the liquor dealers 
from the field. He did like service in Mill- 
ville and Bridgeton in the same county. 
When he went to Philadelphia he was sworn 
in as a special policeman to bring lawless 
li([uor sellers to justice; and he succeeded in 
bringing to justice more than one hundred and 
sixty. His son, Dr. C. E. Welch, followed 
in the same kind of work in Vineland; for, 
when this city was again infested with surrep- 
titious liquor sellers, he also organized a 
league, and banished them from the town, he 
acting as chief prosecutor for several years. 



Dr. Thomas B. Welch has been very prom- 
inently before the public. He is one of the 
Directors of the Vineland Water Works; and 
he was at one time President of the State 
Dental Society, being well known throughout 
his State in his profession. He is a member 
of the International Spelling Reform Associa- 
tion, and its method of spelling he uses quite 
extensively in his editorial work. Relig- 
iously, Dr. Welch is identified with the 
Methodists, formerly as a travelling preacher 
and latterly a local preacher. After forty 
years of happy married life his first wife died 
in April, 1894. His second marriage was 
with Miss Victoria C. Sherburne, of Vineland, 
October 23, 1895. 




^jI-:V. WILLIAM DEY STULTZ, 
pastor of the First Methodist Protes- 
tant Church of Bridgeton, was born 
at Union Valley, Middlesex County, August 
31, 1857. He is a son of the Rev. FAias Dey 
and Ellen Stultz (Dey) Stultz, and is of un- 
mixed German descent. His great-grand- 
father on the paternal side, who was of Ger- 
man birth, was a pioneer of Union Valley; 
while John Stultz, the grandfather, was a life- 
long resident of that place. 

The Rev. Elias Dey Stultz was born in 
Union Valley, May 22, 1822. He learned 
the carpenter's trade when a young man, and 
followed it for a number of years. He was 
also employed for some time at railroading. 
While engaged in these occupations he had a 
strong desire to enter the ministry. At 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



105 



length, having duly qualified himself for the 
profession, he obtained his wish, and became 
one of the leaders in the Methodist Protestant 
church. He erected with his own hands the 
first church of that denomination in Union 
Valley. To complete the furnishing of the 
edifice, he also gave much of his own property. 
This was one of the pioneer Methodist Protes- 
tant churches in New Jersey, and Mr. Stultz 
accomplished a great work in establishing it. 
Its pastor for many years, he gathered about 
him a large congregation, and was widely es- 
teemed as a man of ability and unflinching 
rectitude. Subsequently for four years he 
was pastor of the church at Manasquan, Mon- 
mouth County. At the end of that period, 
yielding to . the earnest solicitation of the 
people of his original charge, he returned to 
Union Valley. With that place as his head- 
quarters, he labored for fourteen years as a 
travelling preacher, superintending many 
churches in the district. During this time 
he resided four years at Glassboro, four years 
at Barnsboro, and one year at Leesburg. 
During the following eighteen years he was 
pastor at Manasquan, taking but a short rest 
in all that time, when a son preached for him. 
His last charge was the Second Methodist 
Protestant Church of Bridgeton, where he 
labored for one year and three months. He 
was then superannuated, and he returned to 
Manasquan, where he is now living in retire- 
ment. Mr. Stultz was active in the ministry 
for over forty years. One of the strong men 
of the New Jer.sey Methodist Protestant Con- 
ference, he was President of that organization 



a number of times, and is fondly called "the 
father of the conference." His wife, who 
was born in Union Valley in 1824, was also a 
member of the German community of that lo- 
cality. Of their seven children five are liv- 
ing, namely: Mary Anna, the wife of Robert 
Van Deusen, of Manasquan; Hettie, the wife 
of John S. Duffield, of Glassboro; Lewis 
Dey, a minister of the Methodist Protestant 
church, now stationed at Westville, Glouces- 
ter County; Edward S. V., a resident of 
Manasquan, who has been active in journalism 
for seventeen years, and is now the editor of 
the Seaside Gazette; and William Dey, the 
subject of this sketch, who is the youngest. 

The Rev. William Dey Stultz acquired the 
rudiments of his education in the public 
schools of Glassboro. After preparing for 
college at Freehold Institute, he entered 
Princeton with the class of iSSo. His col- 
lege career was interrupted by sickness; but 
he completed the course under private tuition, 
and was admitted to the ministry in i<S8i. In 
October of that year the Conference jilaceil 
him in charge of the church in Bridgeton, of 
which he is now pastor. The society has 
been remarkably [irosperous under his leatler- 
ship. At his installation the congregation 
numbered fifty, and had had a hard struggle for 
existence. His predecessor, the Rev. I. Mc- 
Dowell, who was pastor for two years previous 
to Mr. Stultz's appointment, had succeeded 
in lightening the financial biu'dens, and had 
opened a way for the progress initiated by Mr. 
Stultz. In the winter of 1882 a revival in- 
creased the membership. The church was en- 



io6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



larged in the following summer, and over one 
hundred new members joined during the year. 
In 1889 an opening was perceived in the lower 
part of the city. The opportunity was availed 
of to organize another society, and the Second 
Methodist Protestant Church on South Avenue 
was built. This was at first a mission, but a 
successful revival increased the membership, 
so that before the end of the year it was a self- 
sustaining church. In the following year the 
First Church was again remodelled. This had 
hardly been accomplished when a spirit of 
improvement prompted the congregation, now 
largely augmented, to build a new edifice; and 
in 1 89 1 and 1892 the present structure was 
erected. With its stained glass windows and 
artistic finishing the building presents a 
pleasing object to the eye. It has a seating 
capacity of five hundred and fifty, but it is so 
arranged that it will accommodate from eight 
hundred to a thousand at an emergency. The 
chapel, class-room, Bible class-room, infant- 
room, and parsonage are all connected with 
the church; and the pastor can step from his 
hall to the pulpit platform. The membership 
is now over four hundred. The society has a 
large Sunday-school, and connected with it is 
the largest branch of the Christian Endeavor- 
ers in South Jersey. 

On November 26, 1884, Mr. Stultz was 
married to Miss Ida Watson, of Penn's Grove, 
Salem County, youngest daughter of the Rev. 
J. L. Watson, one of the older clergymen of 
the Methodist Protestant church. The union 
has been blessed by four children — Nellie D., 
Alvin D., Maude V., and Lillian D. Mr. 



Stultz is at present Assistant Secretary of the 
Conference, and was elected delegate to the 
General Conference held in Kansas City in 
1896. He served for several years on the 
PIxecutive Board of the Christian Endeavor 
Society, and last year he was Vice-President of 
the State Union. In him are happily com- 
bined the qualities of an eloquent preacher, an 
able pastor, and a gentleman. While he is 
popular with the young people, he is held in 
the highest esteem by the older people. 




ILLIAM ASHCROFT EAST- 
LACK, a prosperous farmer, dairy- 
man, and stock raiser of Deerfield township, 
was born in Richwood village, Gloucester 
County, November 13, 1S5S. He is a son of 
Elijah S. and Elizabeth (Hichner) P3astlack, 
respectively of Deerfield and Elmer, Salem 
County. His grandfather, James Eastlack, a 
son of Amos Eastlack, was born at Carpenter's 
Landing (now Mantua), Gloucester County,, 
in 1794, and there grew to maturity. In early 
manhood James Eastlack followed the sea, 
while the latter part of his life was spent in 
the pursuit of agriculture. He was engaged 
in the latter occupation successively on a farm 
between Mantua and Mullica Hill and on 
one at Richwood, both in Gloucester County. 
He died in the latter place in January, 1875. 
His wife, Sarah, who was a daughter of Sam- 
uel Ashcroft, a farmer of Mullica Hill, lived 
but a short time after the demise of her hus- 
band, passing away in March, 1875. Both 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



107 



church. He was an old-time Whig. They 
were the parents of four children, namely: 
Keziah, the wife of Asa Gardner, of Pitman 
Grove; Mary, the widow of Jacob G. Tomlin, 
and now living at Jefferson, N.J.; Elijah S., 
the father of William A.; and Samuel, who 
died in Richwood in July, 1893. 

Elijah S. Eastlack, who was born near 
Mullica Hill, January 8, 1832, assisted his 
father on the home farm for some time. He 
eventually bought a farm for himself, one of 
the largest in the township, on which he made 
so many improvements that it is one of the 
most beautiful estates in the county. He is 
now actively engaged in general farming, rais- 
ing and selling hay and feed, and fattening 
and killing cattle for the Bridgeton markets. 
In politics he is a Republican. His wife, 
I'Llizabeth, is a daughter of David Hichner, of 
I'^lmcr, a farmer of Gloucester County, whose 
father, Jacob Hichner, was a member of an old 
county family. Her mother's maiden name 
was Margaretta Sissons. Mrs. Elijah S. 
Eastlack is a member of the Daretown Presby- 
terian Church, which her husband attends and 
supports. Their children are: William Ash- 
croft, the subject of this sketch; Margaretta, 
an art student at the Drexel Institute; Adella, 
a teacher in Boston, whose home is with her 
parents; Charles, who resides in Bridgeton; 
and Martha, who is making a special study of 
music, living with her parents. 

William Ashcroft Eastlack attended school 
in Richwood for a time, and was a student for 
two years at Pennington Seminary. He was 
closely associated with his father in farm 



work until he was twenty-seven years old. In 
1884 he moved to the farm of Mrs. William 
Tice, which eventually became his own; and 
there he has since been successfully engaged 
in general farming and dairying. He keeps a 
number of high grade milch cows, and ships 
quantities of milk and dairy products to Phil- 
adelphia. Mr. Eastlack is very progressive 
in his methods of farming, and has been con- 
nected with the Horticultural and Agricultural 
Society of Cumberland County, serving on the 
committees. The great interest of his life is 
centred in his home and farm, and he belongs 
to no clubs or societies. 

In 1884 Mr. Eastlack was married to Miss 
Laura Tice, daughter of William and Pollen 
(Padget) Tice, both natives of Deerfield town- 
ship. William Tice, who was the original 
owner of this farm, devoted the greater part of 
his life to agricultural jnirsuits. He spent 
his last days in Deerfield village, where he 
died in 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Eastlack, have 
two children — ^ Walter L. and Harold. Mr. 
Eastlack votes the Republican ticket. He 
and his wife are members of the old Presby- 
terian church in Deerfield. 




ILLIAM HAAS MILLER, an ex- 
tensive property-owner in Carmel, 
was born October 14, 1823, on Terre Hill, 
Lancaster County, Pa., son of Samuel and 
Nancy (Haas) Miller, both natives of Phila- 
delphia. The father spent most of his life 
in Lancaster County. He and his wife were 
members of the Methodist lipiscopal church. 



io8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



William Haas INIillcr obtained a common- 
school education in his native town. When 
he was twenty years old he secured a position 
as clerk in a general merchandise store of 
Reading, Pa. Several years later he went to 
Philadelphia, where, after spending some time 
in the capacity of clerk, he entered the real 
estate business, for which he seemed to have 
a natural aptitude, and was very successful. 
While in Philadelphia he built a fine house, 
which he still owns. In 1861 he purchased 
one hundred and seventy-four acres of land in 
Deerfield township, this county, his tax then 
being eight dollars and twenty-five cents on 
the unimproved property. Mr. Miller used 
that farm as a summer home, spending his 
winters in Philadelphia. He continued buy- 
ing land after this until in all he owned about 
twenty-five hundred acres. Taking advantage 
of a large immigration of Jews between 1882 
and 1889, he divided this land into town lots 
and small farms, and sold it at a good profit to 
tlie new-comers. Among the buildings erected 
by him was a factory, thirty-six feet by 
seventy, and four stories high, where shirt 
waists, wrappers, and such goods are manu- 
factured for the New York trade by two hun- 
dred and fifty work-people. He also built a 
large creamery, which is now used as a hall, 
and six stores, which he lets for rent. He 
now has forty houses, and the population of 
the place is from six hundred to twelve hun- 
dred residents, according to the times. For 
the tax of eight dollars and twenty-five cents 
first assessed on his property he now pays two 
hundred and sixty dollars, although he has 



effected many sales. Another source of in- 
come to Mr. Miller is a fine cranberry bog of 
ten acres, on which he raises annually from 
six to eight hundred bushels of berries. The 
berries bring from two to four dollars a box. 
In 1882 he built a fine residence, with all the 
modern improvements, and grounds well laid 
out. In looking out for his own interests Mr. 
Miller has done much for the town. He se- 
cured the first post-office, and officiated as 
Postmaster for five years. He had a school 
established here, and served as one of the first 
Trustees. He was District Clerk for five 
years. He has kept aloof from the political 
arena; but he votes the Republican ticket, as 
he favors a protective tariff. He erected a 
church for a free Methodist organization, but 
when the Jews came he liberally gave it to 
them for a synagogue. 

In 1852 Mr. Miller was married to Cather- 
ine L. Martin, of Allentown, Pa., a daughter 
of Dr. Peter Martin, who was a iirominent 
physician in that town. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
have had two children, both now deceased. A 
life like Mr. Miller's, illustrating as it does 
the advantages of industry and intelligent 
enterprise, must necessarily exert a wholesome 
influence on the rising generation. 



C' 



OLONEL WILLIAM ELMER 
POTTER, of Bridgcton, N.J., the 
youngest son of James Boyd and 
Jane (Barron) Potter, was born in this city, 
June 13, 1S40. A lawyer by profession, he 
has attained a prominent position at the bar of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



lo^ 



New Jersey, and takes an active interest in 
public affairs. His paternal grandfather, Colo- 
nel David Potter, was an officer in the Revo- 
lution; and he himself is a veteran of the 
Civil War. 

David Potter was a son of Matthew Potter, 
who went from Scotland to Ballyeaston, 
County Antrim, Ireland, and came thence to 
this country during the great Presbyterian 
emigration about 1740. He settled in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., where both he and his wife were 
members of the First Presbyterian Church for 
many years. David Potter was born in Phila- 
delphia, November 27, 1745. In 1768 he 
married Mary Nason; and soon after his mar- 
riage he removed to Bridgeton, where he es- 
tablished himself as a merchant. In the Rev- 
olution he served with credit as Colonel of the 
Second Battalion of Cumberland County mili- 
tia, and also as Colonel of a battalion of State 
troops. He became prominent and influential 
in the affairs of the county, and was in all re- 
spects thoroughly representative of the best 
element of citizenship. Colonel' Potter's son, 
James Boyd Potter, was a prosperous merchant 
of Bridgeton for nearly fifty years; and for 
about twenty-five years he was President of the 
Cumberland Bank of this city. He was a 
man of unquestioned integrity, highly re- 
spected in all the relations of life. 

William E. Potter, the special subject of 
this biography, acquired his elementary educa. 
tion in the schools of his native town. Hav- 
ing determined upon the law as a profession, 
in October, 1857, he entered the office of the 
Hon. John T. Ni.xon, remaining there until 



September, 1859, in which month he became 
a student in the Law School of Harvard Uni- 
versity. From this school he was graduated 
in January, 1861, with the degree of LL.B. ; 
and in September of the same year he entered 
the Junior class of Princeton College. His 
collegiate career was cut short, however, owing 
to the progress of the great ci\'il strife which 
by that time had assumed such proportions as 
to overshadow all the existing conditions of 
business and social life. Filled with patriotic 
ardor, he abandoned his studies for the time; 
but subsequently, in 1863, he received from 
Princeton College his degree of A. B. and 
in 1 866 that of A.M. 

Having assisted in raising a company on the 
President's call for five hundred thousand vol- 
unteers to serve for three years, or during the 
war, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant 
of Company K, Twelfth New Jersey Volun- 
teers, August 14, 1862, and mustered into the 
service of the United States as such Septem- 
ber 4, 1862. After spending some months in 
Maryland, the regiment joined the Army of 
the Potomac, and was assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps, 
in December, 1862. On December 26, 1862, 
Lieutenant Potter was detached from his regi- 
ment, and appointed ordnance officer of the 
division, then commanded by Major-general 
William H. French. He served in this capac- 
ity during the campaigns of Chancellorsville 
and Gettysburg and until October i, 1863. 
In his report of the battle of Chancellorsville, 
dated May 16, 1863, Major-general French 
speaks of his conduct as follows: "Lieutenant 



II<? 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



W. E. Potter, ordnance officer, was indefati- 
gable, brave, and zealous. His department was 
never better served. " The report of Brigadier- 
general Alexander Hayes, who commanded 
the division at the battle of Gettysburg, also 
commends the conduct of Lieutenant Potter 
in that action. 

On August 6, 1863, he was promoted to be 
First Lieutenant of his company; and on Oc- 
tober I, 1863, he was made Judge Advocate 
of his division. In this capacity he served 
upon the staff of Brigadier-general Alexander 
Hayes until the division became part of the 
Second Division, Second Army Corps, in 
1864. He was promoted to be Captain of 
Company G of his regiment, February 6, 
1864; and, having rejoined his regiment and 
taken command of his company, he was 
wounded in action at the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, May 6, 1864, reporting again for duty 
at Cold Harbor, June 4 of the same year. On 
July I, 1864, Captain Potter was detailed as 
aide-de-camp to Colonel Thomas A. Smyth, 
commanding Third Brigade, Second Division, 
Second Army Corps. August i, 1864, he was 
detailed as Judge Advocate, Second Division, 
Second Army Corps, on the staff of Major- 
general John Gibbon; and he served in this 
capacity until January 15, 1865, when he was 
detailed as aide-de-camp to General Gibbon, 
commanding Twenty-fourth Army Corps. He 
remained on duty in this last-named position 
(to which were added at one time the duties 
of acting Inspector-general and subsequently 
those of Judge Advocate of the corps) until 
he was mustered out of service, June 4, 1865. 



He was present in the following engage- 
ments with the enemy: Chancellorsville, 
Gettysburg, Auburn, Bristoe Station, Black- 
burn's Ford, Locust Grove, Campaign of Mine 
Run, Morton's Ford, Wilderness, Cold Har- 
bor, the entire campaign of Petersburg, from 
June 15, 1864, to January 15, 1865, Deep 
Bottom (first and second). Ream's Station, 
Hatcher's Run, Boydton Road, assault and 
capture of Petersburg, Rice's Station, and 
Appomattox Court-house. On April 11, 1865, 
in company with Major Andrew H. Embler, 
he conducted the several corps of Lee's army 
into position for the formal surrender of their 
arms and colors ; and by an order from head- 
quarters, Twenty-fourth Army Corps, he was 
subsequently detailed, with five other officers, 
to deliver the colors surrendered by Lee's 
army, seventy-six in number, to the Secretary 
of War at Washington. This ceremony oc- 
curred May I, 1865, and upon this occasion 
Captain Potter received the brevet of Major of 
United States Volunteers. In 1866 Major 
Potter was commissioned aide-de-camp to 
Marcus L. Ward, Governor of New Jersey, 
with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

In 1S65 Colonel Potter was achnittcd to 
practice as an attorney -at-law, and in 1869 as 
a counsellor. He began practice in liridge- 
ton, and in 1870 formed a partnership with J. 
Boyd Nixon, which continued until 1894. 
He was a delegate to the Republican National 
Convention at Chicago in 1868, also to that 
held in Cincinnati in 1876, which resulted in 
the nomination of Rutherford B. Hayes, and 
was an Elector on the Garfield ticket in 1880. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Colonel Potter was elected an honorary mem- 
ber of the Society of the Cincinnati of New 
Jersey, July 4, 1874, and President of the 
Union Officers' Association in 18S0. He is 
a Companion of the Pennsylvania Commandery 
of the Loyal Legion, being elected in 1868, 
and is also a member of Post No. 2, Grand 
Army of the Republic, Department of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Colonel Potter was married May 27, 1869, 
to Miss Alice Eddy, a daughter of the late 
Rev. Alfred EMv, of Niles, Mich. Their 
children are: Alfred Lddy; James Boyd, a 
graduate of the United States Naval Academy, 
now in the office with his father; David; 
Alice; and Francis Delevan. 




f^T^ULFORD LUDLAM, Lay Judge 
of the Cumberland County Court, 
to which office he was ajipointed 
in 1893, was born in Millville, N.J., on the 
23d of December, 1844. 

Judge Ludlam's father, Peter G. Ludlam, 
was a man of wide influence and strongly 
marked character. He was alile by the exer- 
cise of an unusually sountl judgment to realize 
a measure of success that rarely comes to 
men who have opportunities made for them. 
A survey of his life is an evidence of this. 
He was born December 20, 1818, in Dennis- 
ville, Cape May County; and he acquired his 
education in his native town. When sixteen 
or seventeen years of age he came to Millville, 
and here learned the trade of shoemaker at 
which he worked until he was twenty -one. 



He then became a clerk in the employ of the 
Mulford Brothers, who were shoe merchants. 
A few years later Mr. Ludlam was in a posi- 
tion to establish himself independently in 
business; and in 1855, or about that time, he 
opened the first drug store in Millville. 'Piiis 
new branch of business was something of an 
innovation in the then unpretentious town, 
but its financial success proved tlie wisdom of 
the enterprising venturer. The same old store 
is still occupied by his son and successor on 
the corner of High and Main Streets, and has 
the patronage of the best jiart of the comnni- 
nity. Mr. Peter G. Ludlam continued in the 
drug business until his death, in May, 1S80; 
but during this time he had many other inter- 
ests. For ten years he was Postmaster; and, 
the post-office and drug store being under one 
roof, he was able to serve the public in a 
double capacity. In polities he was zealously 
active, running once for Surrogate on the 
Democratic ticket; and he was for a number of 
years a P'reehoJder. P'or a period of twenty- 
five years he was the Commissioner of Deeds, 
most of the oltl deeds of that town, as well as 
of Vineland, having been acknowledged before 
him. At the expiration of his term of office 
he was appointed by Governor Joel Parker 
Notary Public, and also Master in Chancery, 
which practically revested him with precisely 
the same powers; and he continued to have 
deeds acknowledged before him until his 
death. Mr. Ludlam's advice was often sought 
by his friends and neighbors upon matters 
where good, clear judgment was needed, and 
he became very popular by reason of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



acumen and sagacity. He married Miss 
Tamson E. Mulford, the daughter of Lewis 
Mulford, of Millville. Five children were 
born to thcni, namely: Thomas M., the eld- 
est, a dry-goods merchant of Millville; Mul- 
ford, also of Millville, who holds the office of 
Judge, as above stated; Emma, the wife of Mr. 
Henry Lippincott; Sally, who died young; 
Khoda, the wife of Mr. Henry Sockwell, of 
Millville, a nephew of ex-Sheriff Sockwell. 
Mrs. Ludlam died in June, 1893, having sur- 
vived her husband thirteen years. He was for 
twenty years Treasurer of the I^resbyterian 
church, which he attended, and for which he 
was an active worker, though not, as his wife, 
a member. Mrs. I^udlam's father, Lewis 
Mulford, was an old resident of Millville; 
and her brother, Lewis Mulford, Jr., was the 
President of the National Bank of this town. 

Mulford Ludlam, after leaving the public 
schools of Millville, went into his father's 
store, where he was a clerk until he was 
twenty-one years old. After his father's 
death he entered into partnership with Mr. 
Lippincott, under the firm name of Ludlam & 
Lippincott, which continued for four years. 
I le then assumed sole charge and projirietor- 
ship of the drug store, which for almost half 
a century has been known as Ludlam's Corner 
Store, carrying a full line of drugs, sundries, 
paints, and stationery, and is the oldest mer- 
cantile establishment in the vicinity. Like 
his father. Judge Ludlam has been much en- 
gaged in public affairs. For the last ten years 
he has been Treasurer of the Hope l^uilding 
and Loan Association, which is the largest in 



the city. In 1889 he was first elected to the 
legislature on the Democratic ticket, and in 
1890 he served upon the Banking and Insur- 
ance Committee, and also upon the Industrial 
Home Committee. The session now being 
Republican, there were fewer committees than 
during the previous year. The following year 
he was nominated by the Democrats, but the 
Republicans carried the county. He was, 
however, appointed assistant engrossing clerk 
of the Senate. A year later, by Governor 
Green's appointment, he was made County 
Clerk, filling the vacanc)' in that office caused 
by the death of Mr. Godfrey, the preceding 
incumbent; and at the ne.\t election, although 
the Republican candidate was chosen, Mr. 
Ludlam ran far ahead of his ticket. It was 
by appointment of Governor Wertz and by con- 
sent of the Senate that he received the lay 
judgeship of Cumberland County, an office of 
five years' tenure, two of which he has already 
served. For a number of years he has not 
failed to attend the Democratic State Conven- 
tion, and he was for three years on the Board 
of Registration. In 1893, though knowing 
the strong probabilities of defeat. Judge 
Ludlam accepted a nomination fin' the Senate. 
This he was intluced to do from a sense of 
obligation to his party; and he foresaw the re- 
sult, which, as he expected, brought victory 
to the rival candidate. 

Mr. Mulford Ludlam married on October 
22, 1866, Miss Mollie Dunham, of Millville, 
a daughter of Richard and Rebecca Dunham. 
Four children have been born of this union, 
namely: Paul T., who is with his father in 



BIO(iRAPHICAL REVIEW 



business; John C, of Camden; Rena D. ; and 
Mulford, Jr. 

Judge Ludlam is a member of Shckinah 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; of Richmond Chap- 
ter and of Olivet Commandery, Knights 
Templars; and has been a faithful attendant 
at the triennial conclaves of the Knights 
Templars held at San Francisco, Chicago, 
St. Louis, and Boston. He also belongs to 
Millville Lodge, No. 47, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He is an attendant and sup- 
porter of the Presbyterian church, of which 
his family are members, and of which he has 
been a Trustee for some years, having found 
time among his various other offices and busi- 
ness relations to devote to church work and 
to the obligations which rightfully belong to 
all Christian men. 

The financial success which crowned his 
father's efforts has also followed his, and the 
handsome block of brick buildings extending 
on High Street from Main to Smith Streets 
are substantial tokens of well-deserved pros- 
perity. 

'iLLIAM OSBORNE GARRISON, 
of the well-known firm of Garrison 
& iMinch, and one of the most prominent busi- 
ness men of Bridgeton, N.J., was born on a 
farm in Stoe Creek township, Cumberland 
County, on July 29, 185 i. His parents were 
William and Mary (Garretson) Garrison. 
His grandfather, Stephen Garrison, was from 
the northern part of Salem County. He mar- 
ried Mary Reeves, and later removed to Pitt's 
Grove township. He was a miller by trade. 




and, moving about considerably, had charge of 
grist and .saw mills in different places. The 
family still have the sword which he used 
when he served as a soldier in the War of 
1812. 

William Garrison, son of Stephen, was born 
in Pitt's Grove township, Salem County, near 
the place now known as l-'lmer, on Ajiril 23, 
1 8 10. Having married a fair maid of l^'air- 
ton, he moved to Cumberland County in 1835, 
living in Stoe Creek township on one farm 
for fifty-eight years. In politics he was a 
Whig and later a l\epub]ican. Being a 
straightforward, representative man, who had 
the confidence of his fellow-citizens, he held 
different local offices. ICnergctic and enter- 
prising, he was one of the first farmers who 
engaged in the preparation of sand for the 
manufacture of glass. He was a Deacon of 
the Baptist church for many years. His wife, 
Mary Garretson, was the daughter of Ethan 
Osborne and Polly (Bateman) Garretson. 
Her father was a ship-carpenter, who worked 
at his trade in P'airton and vicinity. He was 
noted for his remarkable strength. Mr. and 
Mrs. William Garrison had seven children, as 
follows: luioch, who lives in Ouinton, \.J.: 
Sarah B., who died unmarried; Martha, wife 
of Edgar Shephard, of this county; William 
Osborne; John B., a farmer; Henry S., who 
is in the furniture business at Cedarville; 
Mary, who died after becoming the wife of 
D. S. Ham. The father died in March, 1892; 
and the mother, who was born on Christmas 
Day, 1826, died in 1893. 

William Osborne Garrison received a com- 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



mon-school education in the town of Stoe 
Creek, and remained on the home farm during 
liis minority. When of age he began teaching 
in Dividing Crcelv, being engaged there from 
October, 1870, until the following June. 
The money thus earned was utilized by him 
in securing further educational advantages at 
South Jersey Institute, where he went for a 
year. The next year he taught at Port Norris, 
organizing the first graded school in the town. 
After that his studies were again resumed, and 
in 1873 he was graduated from the institiitc, 
where he subsequently took a post-graduate 
course, completing it in 1875. At Port EUz- 
abeth he taught a year, at the end of which 
time he was elected principal of one of the 
Bridgeton schools. Three years later Mr. 
Garrison was elected county superintendent of 
schools, which ofifice he held five years, faith- 
fully and efficiently devoting his time to the 
cause of education. He then bought out the 
interest of Elmer Danzenbaker, in the firm of 
Apjjlegate & Danzenbaker, the firm being con- 
tinued as Applegate & Garrison until Mr. 
Minch bought out Mr. Applegate, since which 
time Garrison & Minch have successfully man- 
aged the enterprise that was started over forty 
years ago. They have built a fine three-story 
block one hundred feet front by eiglity feet 
deep, of which they occupy one-third them- 
selves. This block extends back, giving them 
large dock privileges. They are not only the 
oldest concern of the kind, but they do the 
largest business. Garrison & Minch also run 
a fertilizer-mill, grinding bones and manu- 
facturin<; a fertilizer for sale. 



Mr. Garrison is identified with a number of 
organizations in this city, the county, and 
elsewhere. He is Treasurer and a member of 
the Board of Trustees of South Jersey Insti- 
tute; Secretary and Treasurer of the Garrison 
Sand Company, a corporation that produces 
and sells twenty thousand tons of glass sand 
annually; Secretary and Treasurer of North 
I5ridgeton Land Company, a corporation own- 
ing and improving two hundred and fifty 
building lots within the city limits; member 
of the firm of Garrison & Jonas, who own and 
operate a sand-washing plant near Millville, 
putting out fifteen thousand tons yearly; Sec- 
retary and acting President of the Brandywine 
Sand Company for glass, located in Downing- 
town, Pa. ; President and General Manager of 
Cumberland Construction Company, a concern 
that constructs bridges, and does other kinds 
of contracting; County Treasurer for this 
county, having been elected by the Board of 
Freeholders in May, 1892, and re-elected in 
1894 for three years, the official term being 
lengthened. In that office Mr. Garrison pays 
out a thousand dollars a day the year round. 
He owns twelve hundred acres of real estate, 
farming the half that is improved. In jioli- 
tics he is an active Republican. 

On December 25, 1876, Mr. Garrison was 
united in marriage with Miss Carrie Oglee, of 
Port IClizabeth, N.J., a daughter of Francis 
Oglee. Mr. and Mrs. Garrison are the hajipy 
parents of three children — I'Vancis, Chester, 
and Carrie. I'"rancis, the eldest, is a student 
in South Jersey Institute. To attain the 
honor and distinction of their father, these 




ANDREW R. JUDSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"5 



young people will find no better way than, 
like him, to take life in earnest, improve their 
opportunities for education, and thus prepare 
themselves for useful service in maturer years. 
Mr. Garrison and his wife are members of the 
First Baptist Church, in which he has been 
President of the Board of Trustees, and in ac- 
tive membership since coming here. They 
own and occupy a fine house on West Com- 
merce Street. 



tNDREW R. JUDSON, M.U., a well- 
known physician and surgeon of New- 
^« — ' port, Cumberland County, N.J., was 
born in Plattsville, Greene County, N.Y., 
March 15, 1S62, son of Andrew C. and Nancy 
(Stafford) Judson. 

On his paternal side, many generations re- 
moved, he is of Welsh descent; and he has 
in his possession a meat-hook, which was 
made in Wales by one of the progenitors of 
the family four hundred years ago, and which, 
as an heirloom, has beenpassed down through 
the family ever since. His grandfather, 
Noah Judson, was born in the State of Con- 
necticut, July 12, 1776, and when he was a lad 
removed with his parents to Jefferson, Dela- 
ware County, N.Y., where they were among 
the early settlers. They built log huts,- 
cleared and cultivated the land, fought the 
Indians, who were its original occupants, and, 
in short, experienced the toils, the hardships, 
and the enjoyments attendant upon pioneer 
life. Noah Judson was a farmer and a black- 
smith. 

Andrew C. Judson, his son, was born in 



Jefferson, N.V., April 16, 1813. lie was an 
avidious reader; and he largely educated him- 
self, his attendance at the public schools dur- 
ing his boyhood being limited to about three 
months yearly in the winter season. He 
worked on the home farm until he was twenty- 
one years of age. On the attainnient of his 
majority he married, and purchased a farm, on 
which he engaged for a number of years in 
general agricultural pursuits. He was a pro- 
fessional dairyman, keeping also, besides his 
stock, between two hundred and three hundred 
sheep; and the income of the dairy he de- 
posited, meeting the expenses of living and 
of the conduct of the farm with the receipts 
from the other departments of his calling. 
Several years previous to his father's decease 
he sold his own estate, and went to live with 
his parents on their farm in order to care for 
them during their declining days. 

Shortly after liis father's demise he disposed 
of the paternal property, and removed to 
Franklin, N.Y., where, purchasing a farm of 
four hundred acres, he carried on dairying 
with very great success. Just before the out- 
break of the war of the Rebellion he sold his 
Franklin estate, and removed to Plattsville, 
N.Y. , he having suffered the affliction of los- 
ing by death in one year six of his children in 
an epidemic of dysentery, which prevailed in 
the vicinity of his residence. In Plattsville 
he became the owner of a flour-mill, which he 
had operated for about two years, when he dis- 
posed of it, and changed his home to Vine- 
land, Cumberland County, N.J., .settling on 
Chestnut Avenue, near Malaga Road. While 



ii6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



residing in Vineland he bought and sold sev- 
eral estates, finally buying a farm at a place 
in Gloucester County, about six miles north 
of Vineland, called "The Lake." Remaining 
there about a year, he in 1865 fixed his resi- 
dence at Newfield, a town in the southern ex- 
tremity of Gloucester County, where he lived 
in retirement from active business until his 
decease. 

On September g, 1S35, Mr. Andrew C. Jud- 
son was married to Miss Nancy II., a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Stafford. Mrs. Judson's 
parents were among the early settlers of 
Schoharie, N.Y., where they experienced a 
life of hardship from the ruggedness of the 
territory and from the hostility of the Indians. 
Mr. and Mrs. Judson's union was fruitful in 
the birth of ten children, only three of whom 
are now living, namely: Harriet, who is the 
widow of a Mr. Shaw, late of Kansas City, 
Mo. ; Agnes, who resides at Vineland as the 
wife of Hunter Cornell ; and Andrew R. 

In national politics Mr. Andrew C. Judson 
was affiliated with the Whigs from the time 
that he cast his first ballot until Fremont was 
the Presidential candidate, after which time 
he belonged to the Republican party. He 
was an ardent Abolitionist, and Mrs. Judson 
shared his sentiments. Religiously, he was 
one of the pioneers of the Methodist Epis- 
copal faith in Jefferson, his native town, being 
a member of the church of tJKit denomination 
for over sixty years, and serving it during 
the most of his life in the capacity of Sunday- 
schocd superinttiident, Steward, and Trustee. 
He subscribed for tlie Clnislian Advocate 



when it was first issued, and he continued to 
take that paper until his demise. With that 
religious society Mrs. Judson was also con- 
nected during as long a period as her husband. 
He departed this life July 30, 1890, in his 
seventy-eighth year. His wife, who was born 
November 11, 1814, survived him consider- 
ably over three years, she passing away De- 
cember 8, 1893, at the venerable age of 
seventy-nine years. 

Andrew R. Judson acquired his general 
education at the public schools of Newfield 
and Vineland, N.J., and at Pennington Semi- 
nary, N.J. He began the study of medicine 
with C. A. Baker, M.D., of Florence, N.J., 
and then entered Jefferson Medical College, 
from which institution he was graduated, after 
pursuing the regular course, in the class of 
1885. He then established himself in his 
profession at Dividing Creek, where he prac- 
tised five years, his business demands requir- 
ing his keeping two horses. After that he 
settled for one year at Newfield, whence he 
came to Newport, where he has resided ever 
since, engaged in a large, lucrative practice. 
He has pursued a special course in electro- 
therapeutics under the direction of William 
H. Walling, of Philadelphia; and for the past 
two years he has devoted special attention to 
affections of the throat and nose. He has 
specialized also in extracting teeth. 

On June 24, 1885, Dr. Judson was united 
in marriage to Emma S. lioynton, daughter of 
Mrs. James H. Boynton, then residing at 
Vinelantl, N.J. Her father, who was among 
those who came to V'ineland for health, had 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



«i7 



died several years previous. Mrs. Judson's 
parents were both natives of New Hampshire, 
she herself having been born at picturesque 
Centre Harbor, on Lake VVinnipiseogee. 
James H. Boynton was a member of a numer- 
ous family of Boyntons, Boyingtons, and 
Byingtons, who claim a direct descent from an 
old English family of that name, the most 
prominent member of which was Lord Boyn- 
ton, member of Parliament from Yorkshire 
and an interested friend of the American colo- 
nists. 

The family coat-of-arms is still in exist- 
ence, and dates back to 1638. A reunion of 
the -Boyntons has been held annually for four- 
teen years in Massachusetts. Mrs. Judson's 
mother was a Guilford. The Guilfords trace 
their lineage from Francis North, Lord 
Guilford, a brother of Roger North. He was 
made Keeper of the Great Seal during the 
reign of Charles H. of England. Mention is 
made of him in Macaulay's "History of Eng- 
land."" His younger son, William, settled at 
what is now Danvers, Mass. 

Mrs. Judson was educated in the public 
schools of New Jersey and at the New Hamp- 
shire Conference Seminary and Female Col- 
lege at Tilton, N.IL, where she took a clas- 
sical course for three years, afterward teaching 
for three years, commencing at the youthful 
age of seventeen. She taught for two years in 
Gloucester County, New Jersey, and for a 
year in the grammar schools of Vineland, 
N.J. 

Dr and Mrs. Judson have been blessed by 
the birth of three children, two of whom are 



still living, namely: Delia A., who was born 
September 14, 1886; and Andrew C, who 
was born July 25, 1890. 

Dr. Judson is well and favorably known in 
the community, and participates actively in 
the civic and social life. He is affiliated with 
the fraternity of Masons, being a member of 
Neptune Lodge, No. 75, of Mauricetown; be- 
longs to Morning Light Lodge, No. 8, of the 
Knights of Pythias at Newport; and he also 
fraternizes with Newport Council of the Inde- 
pendent Order of United American Me- 
chanics, located at Newport. He is likewise 
a member of the District Medical Society of 
Cumberland County, anil for two years he has 
represented his fellow-practitioners at the 
State convention. Dr. Judson has also been 
connected with military life, having been from 
1880 to 1885 a private in Company K of the 
Sixth Regiment of National Guards of New 
Jersey. Religiously, he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Newport. In 
1895 he took a Western trip of six months' 
duration for the benefit of liis liealth, going 
to Denver, Colorado Springs, and to the Clear 
Creek mining regions. Mrs. Judson has a 
good deal of poetical talent, and has written 
considerable verse. 



'AMES L. S?iHTH is a prosperous 
wholesale grocer of Miliville. He was 
born July 8, 1857, in West Creek, 
Cape May County, son of Lorenzo D. and 
Sarah (Lawrence) Smith. Abijah Smith, his 
great-grandfather, was a native of Goshen, 



ii8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Cape May County. James L. Smith, the 
grandfather, after whom the subject of this 
sketch was named, owned an extensive farm in 
West Creek, where he also followed the busi- 
ness of surveyor. He is said to have surveyed 
nearly all of Cape May County. In 1S47 and 
1849 he was elected on the Whig ticket as Sen- 
ator for Cape May County. At another time he 
was Judge of the County Court. Estates were 
very frequently intrusted to him for settle- 
ment. He was a member and class leader in 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of whose or- 
ganizers he is believed to have been one. 
From his record it is to be inferred that he was 
one of the most prominent and influential 
men of his time. He married Miss Deborah 
Tomlin, of Goshen; and they had eight chil- 
dren, si.x of whom attained maturity. 

Lorenzo D. Smith was born in 1S28. In 
addition to farming he has manufactured King 
Crabs Fertilizers for the past twenty-five years. 
His present factory is located at the mouth of 
West Creek. His wife, Sarah, is a daughter 
of George Lawrence, a farmer of Dennisville, 
Cape May County, where she was born. She 
had six children, four of whom are living, 
namely: Elizabeth, who married the Rev. 
James C. Wood, of the Philadelphia Confer- 
ence; James L. , the subject of this sketch; 
Lillie, now Mrs. Stephen Wilson, of Cape 
May City; and Henry L, who resides with 
his brother, James L. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
West Creek, Mr. Smith having the further 
relation of Trustee. 

James L. .Smith, after receiving his educa- 



tion in the schools of West Creek, went to 
Island Heights, Ocean County, where he con- 
ducted a general merchandise store for three 
years. He subsequently sold that interest, 
and came to Millville on September 13, 1882. 
Here he started a retail grocery business on 
Broad Street, near the West Jersey Railroad 
depot, where by good management he ac- 
quired a large and lucrative trade. In 1S94 
he sold the store, and engaged in the jobbing- 
business. Mr. Smith has now a large whole- 
sale store on the corner of Broad and Second 
Streets, he being a pioneer in the business in 
this city. He keeps one man on the road, has 
a large stock of goods, and is conducting the 
enterprise with profit. 

On F"ebruary 23, 1881, he married Jennie 
Beebe, daughter of John R. Beebe, and now 
has six children — I^thel B., P"lora, Lorenzo, 
Carrie, Frank, and Lawrence. In politics 
Mr. Smith is a Republican, and has served as 
delegate to important conventions. He was 
appointed Sergeant-at-arms of the New Jersey 
State Senate in 1894, serving also in 1895 
and 1896. 



/^To 



i:ORGE ADAMS PARENT is a 
Vh^J. well-known carpenter of Millville. 
He was born here, June 25, 1826, son of John 
and Mary (Adams) Parent. John Parent was 
born near Milhille, July 9, 1785. He re- 
ceived such educational advantages as the 
times afforded, and became a farmer, dealing 
extensively in hoop poles. He was Road 
Commissioner for years, and died on March 
28, 1S33. His wife, to whom he was married 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



119 



June I, 1S06, was born July i, 17S9, daughter 
of George Adams. Mr. and Mrs. Parent had 
thirteen children, of whom there grew to ma- 
turity Lydia Ann, i\Iary E., Hannah, John, 
Sarah, George A., Joseph, Abigail S., and 
Rebecca. Lydia Ann, now deceased, married 
Jonathan Nixon, of Millville; Mary E. is the 
wife of John Stuttams, of Millville; Hannah 
married Captain Alfred Williams; Sarah is 
the wife of Josiah Shaw, of Millville; Abigail 
S. married Captain James Shaw, of Millville; 
and Rebecca became Mrs. Daniel Hankins. 

George Adams Parent attended the public 
school of his native town for the usual period. 
He then learned the trade of millwright, and 
when he was of age he went to work as a jour- 
neyman carpenter. About 1847 he moved to 
Bridgeton, where he worked for nineteen con- 
secutive years at his trade. Returning then to 
Millville, he was employed as foreman by 
William Packard. In 1S72 Mr. Parent went 
to Crawford County, Kansas, where he was 
engaged as contractor and builder for nearly 
a year. He again returned to his native 
town, and has been engaged in the same busi- 
ness since. Mr. Parent is Past Grand Master 
of Millville Lodge, No. 47, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

On September 5, 1S46, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Dilks, daughter of 
Jeremiah Dilks. Mr. and Mrs. Parent have 
had seven children, four of whom lived to ma- 
turity. These were: Mary Ann, the wife of 
Humphrey S. Higgins, of Florence, N.J.; 
Emma F., the wife of Aaron Wood, of Mill- 
ville; Joseph, residing at home: and Hannah, 



deceased, who married Patrick C. Reed, of 
Millville. Mrs. Parent, who was a member of 
the Baptist church for (jvcr fifty years, died on 
September 27, 1895, at the age of sixty-nine. 
The house in which Mr. Parent and his family 
now reside was built by him in 1884. 



"ERMANN FREDERICK SCHUSS- 
-^ I LER, a manufacturer of gas fixtures 
and art metal in liridgeton, was 
born April 15, 1861, in Leipsic, Germany, 
son of Hermann Robert and Emily (F'red- 
erick) Schussler. His father, also a native of 
Leipsic, born about 1837, obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that city. After 
leaving school Hermann Robert learned the 
shoemaker's trade, and was afterward engaged 
in the shoe business at Delitzsch up to the 
time of his decease. He was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Emily Frederick, and had two 
children — Hermann Frederick and Robert. 
Robert now follows shoemaking in Delitzsch, 
his native town. The father died in 1862. 
Both he and his wife were members of the 
German Lutheran church. 

Hermann Frederick Schussler, having lost 
his father by death when he was only abtuit a 
year old, was reared to manhood in Delitzsch, 
at the home of a maternal uncle, Robert Fred- 
erick. He received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of that place, and afterward learned 
the locksmith's art with his uncle. He fol- 
lowed his trade in Germany until 1882, when 
he emigrated to America, settling in Baltimore, 
Md. After working for six years in Miller's 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Safe and Iron Works, he entered the employ 
of the Schultz Gas Fixture and Art Metal 
Company as a designer. After remaining 
with them for three years he commenced busi- 
ness for himself. In the following year he 
formed a partnership with J. Lenhart Rice, 
under the firm name of the Acme Gas Fi.xture 
Company, and transferred the industry to 
Bridgeton. On July 2, 1895, however, he 
sold his interest to Mr. Rice; and in the fol- 
lowing month he established himself at his 
present factory. He makes a specialty of 
architectural work for public buildings, 
churches, and the like; but he does also a 
large retail and local business. Although his 
manufactory is in its infancy, Mr. Schussler 
employs on the average about twenty-two men. 
On October i, 1883, he was joined in mat- 
rimony with Miss Mary Peters, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. August Peters, of Leipsic, to 
whom she was born on November 18, 1859. 
Mr. Peters, who was also a native of Leipsic, 
served in the German cavalry for twelve years. 
He subsequently officiated as a Sheriff in his 
native town for about a year, then becoming a 
letter-carrier, in which employment he re- 
mained until about two years previous to his 
decease, when he was retired by the govern- 
ment on a pension. He married Miss Mary 
Schultz, who had by him, besides Mrs. 
Schussler, three other children — Kmil, Pau- 
lina, and Ida. Paulina is now the wife of 
Carl Vogt, and Ida married Hermann 
Wenteler Mr. and Mrs. Peters were both 
members of the German Lutheran church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Schussler have one cliild, Her- 



mann W. , who was born June 7, 1888. Both 
are mernbers of the St. John's Lutheran 
Church of Bridgeton. 




HliN H. FOOTE, an assessor and one 
of the older residents of Landis town- 
ship, N.J., was born May 12, 1842, in Marl- 
boro, Hartford County, Conn., son of Asa 
and Caroline (Hale) Foote. Asa Foote, Sr., 
the grandfather, was a highly respected resi- 
dent of Marlboro. One of his sons, Joel, 
was a farmer and mill-owner in the same 
town. 

Asa Foote, the father of Eben H., learned 
the cloth-fulling trade, working for his father 
at different times to fill a vacancy. In 18 19, 
when quite a lad, he went to Cleveland, Ohio, 
where he owned and managed a mill in the 
part of the city that is now the centre of 
the west side. At that time Cleveland was 
so sparsely settled that Mr. I'oote's resi- 
dence was three miles distant from that of 
his nearest neighbor. He bought land and 
continued to reside there for twenty years. 
He was a Captain of the militia, being honor- 
ably discharged after the full time of five 
years' service. In 1839, exxhanging with his 
brother a part of his Cleveland property for an 
ecpiivalent in Marlboro, he returned to tliat 
town. At different times he was a resident 
of four other Connecticut towns; namely, 
Glastonbury, Hartford, Windsor, and Old 
Saybrook. In 1867 he removed to Vineland, 
where he died in 1876, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. The latter part of his life was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



121 



spent in retirement, but he still carried on a 
fruit farm. His wife, Caroline, who was a 
daughter of Ebenezer Hale, of Glastonbury, 
Conn., died in 1S77, at the age of seventy- 
seven. She was of Welsh origin. Her an- 
cestors were noted for fine physique, being 
hale by nature as by name. Samuel Hale, the 
earliest representative of the family in this 
country, who was a soldier in the Pequod War, 
arrived in Hartford as early as 1637. He was 
an extensiv'e land-owner on the east side of 
the river, and was prominent in the affairs of 
the colony. The next four generations of the 
family were represented by Samuel Hale, Jr. ; 
Benjamin; Gideon, who served his country in 
the Revolutionary War; and Ebenezer, the 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch. Asa 
Foote and his wife had five children, but three 
of whom came to maturity. These were: 
Eben H., the subject of this biography; Caro- 
line, who met a tragic death by lightning; and 
Samuel, who now lives in Idaho. 

Eben H. Foote, after receiving a common- 
school education in his native State, enlisted 
in 1 86 1, at the age of nineteen, for service in 
the Civil War. He joined Company K, 
Eleventh Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and 
continued with that regiment in the United 
.States service for four years, one month, and 
fourteen days. The regiment first went to 
Roanoke and then to Nevvbern, where it re- 
mained for several months. In July, rejoin- 
ing the Army of the Potomac, it participated 
in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, 
Fredericksburg, -and the siege of Suffolk. It 
afterward shared in the actions at Swift Creek, 



Drury's Bluff, and Cold Harbor. In Decem- 
ber, 1863, after re-enlisting as regiments, the 
F2ighth and Eleventh went home on a thirty 
days' furlough. Ikith regiments were subse- 
quently at Petersburg, Fort Harrison, and at 
the fall of Richmond. Mr. Foote, who served 
for the greater part as aide-de-camp, was dur- 
ing the last year on the staff of the brigade 
commander. In the course of the war he was 
promoted from the ranks to Corporal, Ser- 
geant, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, 
First Lieutenant, and Cajitain of Company K. 
He saw a great deal of hard service, and was 
twice hit without receiving a serious wound. 
He was engaged in staff duty at Lynchburg 
from July, 1865, until the regiment was or- 
dered home. He was mustered out at City 
Point, Va., December 21, 1865, and arrived 
in Hartford on the following Christmas Day. 

Soon after the close of the war Mr. Foote 
was appointed a civil officer of Chesterfield 
County, Virginia, across the river from Rich- 
mond, under the Reconstruction Acts. He 
was there from 1866 to 1876, holding differ- 
ent positions, seeing much of the local dis- 
order that followed the "war, and taking an 
active part in preserving ])eace. It was a 
crucial jjcriod for N'orthern officials in the 
.South, who were nicknamed "car[)et-baggers " ; 
but he stood it bravely, as did many others. 
In 1876 he returned North and took the farm 
his father had owned. Here he has resided 
since. For seven years he was salesman for 
Kimball, Prince & Co., lumber dealers. 

On April 18, 1880, Mr. Foote was married 
to Miss Jennie -S. Chase, of South Vineland. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



She was a daughter of William Morehouse, 
who was a son of David Morehouse, a farmer 
of Warrensburg, N.Y. , where he had always 
lived. William Morehouse enlisted for the 
Civil War at the age of nineteen. He was 
previously married to Emcline Tubbs, by 
whom he became the father of two children — 
Mrs. Foote and Josephine. The mother still 
lives. The father, who was a soldier of the 
One Hundred and Eighteenth New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry, contracted the measles, took 
cold, and died four days after he reached 
home. His daughter Jennie was then adopted 
by her aunt, Sarah (Morehouse) Chase, whose 
name was then given her. She lived with her 
aunt from 1868 to 1880, when she was mar- 
ried. Mr. Foote has been a delegate to State 
conventions and other gatherings of the Re- 
]niblican party. He belongs to the Lyon 
Grand Army Post, of which he is a Past Com- 
mander and a representative to the State en- 
campment. He served as Assessor of Landis 
township from 1880 to 1885. In 1894 he was 
elected Assessor for three years of the town- 
ship, exclusive of the borough of Vineland. 



rm^ 



i:ORGE W. IRELAND, the manager 
\J^J_ for the Cohansey Glass Company of 
Bridgeton, was born March 29, 1S56, in Will- 
iamstown, Gloucester County, son of Daniel 
and Ann (De Hart) Ireland. Daniel Ireland, 
Mr. Ireland's father, was born in Williams- 
town in 1 8 16. After completing his studies 
in the common schools, he learned the trade 
of a wheelwright. He afterward established 



himself in the carriage-making business, 
which he has followed successfully for many 
years; and he is at the present time the oldest 
wheelwright in Gloucester County.. He is a 
Republican in politics, and has been actively 
concerned in forwarding the interests of his 
party. He served for a number of years as a 
member of the Township Committee. His 
wife, whom he married June 19, 1841, is a 
daughter of Jacob De Hart, of Williamstown. 
She has reared si.x of her ten children, namely: 
Sarah J., the widow of Joseph Button; Ann 
E!., the wife of Charles H. Garwood; Ella M., 
the wife of John Sykes; George W., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; William M. Ireland; and 
Lucy, the wife of Wilmer B. Smith. Both 
parents are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. The father has been united 
with the church for si.xty-five years, and has 
served as Trustee and steward for the greater 
portion of that time. 

George W. Ireland acquired his education 
in the public schools of his native town. 
Upon the completion of his studies he entered 
the employ of Bodine, Thomas & Co., glass 
manufacturers of Williamstown, as assistant 
book-keeper. He later became buyer for that 
concern, with which he remained until 1882, 
when he moved to Bryn Mawr, Pa., where he 
opened a general store. While conducting 
the store he travelled through Pennsylvania as 
the representative of a large grocery house. 
In 18S7 he sold his business in Bryn Mawr, 
and, removing to Bridgeton, was appointed 
buyer and manager for the Cohansey Glass 
Company, a position of high trust and respon- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



123 



sibility that he still holds. His extensive 
knowledge of the glass trade and his superior 
business attainments mal<e him an extremely 
valuable acquisition to the company, whose 
interests he manages with care and foresight. 
In politics he is a Republican. While a resi- 
dent of Williamstown he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Gloucester County Republican Ex- 
ecutive Committee, and also served as a 
delegate to several State and Congressional 
conventions. He is connected with Brearly 
Lodge of A. F. & A. M. ; with Welcome 
Council, Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics; and with Ardmore Castle, Knights 
of the Golden Eagle, of Bryn Mawr. 

On March 2, 1877, Mr. Ireland married 
Georgia T. Allen, daughter of George W. 
Allen, M.D., of Williamstown. Of his three 
children two are living — Stanley A. and 
Percey G. Mr. and Mrs. Ireland are members 
of Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
which Mr. Ireland was ordained Elder, March 
18, 1894, by Bishop E. G. Andrews. 



f(^TON. EDWARD C. STOKES, a resi- 
dent of Millville, was born in I'liila- 
delphia, December 22, i860. His 
great-grandfather, John Stokes, left a son 
bearing the name of William, who was born 
in Mcdford, Burlington County, in 1790. 
William Stokes, who was a man of more than 
ordinary intelligence, attained a position of 
considerable prominence in Medford. He re- 
ceived a common-school education, and learned 
the trade of shoe cutter in his youth. Shortly 



after his marriage he established himself as a 
shoe manufacturer, and soon had enough work 
on hand to warrant his employment of from 
eighteen to twenty hands. There was no other 
shoemaker within twenty miles of him, and he 
supplied most of the Jersey glass store em- 
ployees with foot-gear. He continued his 
business in this line until his death, which 
occurred in 1876. Another interest was his 
connection with the ]5urlington County Na- 
tional Bank of Medford, of which he was a 
Director from its organization in 1836. He 
was married in 18 13 to Ann, daughter of Isaac 
Wilson. Of the ten children born of this 
marriage the following reached maturity: 
Barclay, who died in 1842, twenty-nine years 
old; Phcebe, who was twice married, becom- 
ing successively Mrs. Brown and Mrs. James 
Roberts; Wilson, of whom there is no special 
record; Caspar and Alfred, deceased; Beulah, 
the wife of MarkZelley; and lulward Hicks, 
the father of Edward C. Stokes. John died 
when four years of age. The parents were 
both members of the Society of Friends in 
Medford, the father being an Elder, while 
the mother was clerk of the meeting. 

Edward Hicks Stokes was a native of Med- 
ford, born in 1830. He was educated in tlie 
common schools of his native town, and at an 
early age was employed in a drug store, where 
he remained for seventeen years. In 1857 he 
took a position in a wholesale drug house in 
Philadelphia, and a year later was sent by iiis 
employers to Galena, 111., to take charge of a 
retail drug store which had come into their 
possession in that place. This confidence in 



'24 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the judgment of their clerk was satisfactory 
evidence of his ability and trustworthiness. 
In the autumn of 1858 he sold the Galena 
store, and returned to Philadelphia. A year 
later he gave up his connection with the firm 
he had been serving, and bought a retail estab- 
lishment, which he conducted until 1861, 
when he went into the army as a sutler. He 
returned to Philadelphia afterward, resumed 
the drug business, and was employed in it 
until tlie year 1866, when he sold out and 
moved to Woodbury, N.J. Here he purchased 
the store property of George W. Green, the 
jiroprietor of Green's August Flour, and had 
conducted it for three years, when his leg was 
accidentally broken. Shortly after his recov- 
ery from that injury he sold the place, and 
entered the employment of the Burlington 
National Bank. In 1871 he left Woodbury 
and came to Millville, where he secured a 
clerkshi]) in the National Bank. From this 
position he steadily worked his way upward, 
becoming eventually a Director and the Presi- 
dent of the institution. He is now City 
Treasurer, to which ofifice, exclusive of one 
term, he has been elected since 1875. On 
April 30, 1854, he was united in the bonds of 
wedlock to IVIatilda G. Kemble, a daughter of 
Henry Kemble Kemble, of Millville. He has 
now two children — Edward C. Stokes and 
Howard K. The latter is employed in the 
Globe National Bank, l^rovidence, R.I. 

The Hon. Edward C. Stokes, whose career 
has been one of unusual success, was prepared 
for college in the public schools of Millville. 
He graduated from Brown University in the 



class of 1883, after which he became connected 
with the Millville National Bank, and still 
works in that institution when his legislative 
duties permit. In the spring of 1S89 he was 
made city superintendent of schools, which 
office he has since efficiently filled. In 1890 
and 1 89 1 the Second District sent him to the 
General Assembly. He was sent in 1892 to 
the State Senate, where he served on the 
Education, Railroads, and Canals Committees. 
Returning to the Senate in 1895, he was made 
President of the body. Mr. Stokes is a mem- 
ber of Shekinah Lodge, No. 58, A. F. & 
A. M., and also belongs to Fidelity Council, 
No. 8, Junior Order of United American Me- 
chanics. If his past presage his future, the 
Senator has a brilliant career before him. It 
rarely happens that so young a man attains 
such prominence as he has reached already, 
and Millville may well be proud of a son 
whose personal reputation adds dignity to tlie 
town and district he represents. 




. SEAMAN R. FOWLER, of 
'ineland, N.J., e.\-State Senator and 
the well-known proprietor of llie 
Baker House, was born in New York City on 
the 2 1 St of April, 1S21. His grandfather, 
Moses Fowler, Sr. , was a resident of New 
Rochelle, N.Y., in which town his father, also 
bearing the name of Moses, was born in 1792. 
Moses Fowler, Jr., removed to New York 
City in his youth, and, engaging in the shoe 
business there, was for many years in mercan- 
tile life. Politically, he was loyally adherent 




SEAMAN R. FOWLER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



127 



to the principles of Democracy; and, socially, 
he belonged to the Masonic Order. He mar- 
ried Miss Rhoda Burl is, a daughter of Mr. 
Ramson Burlis, of Long Island. Their chil- 
dren were: Eliza Anne, now deceased, who 
married a Mr. Underbill, of Bronx Hill; Will- 
iam B., now of Vineland ; Seaman R., of 
whom this sketch is written; Mary J., wife of 
Mr. James Wooding, of Vineland; Caroline, 
wife of Hubbell H. Alvord, also of Vine- 
land. Mr. Moses Fowler, the younger, died 
in 1866, aged seventy-four years, outliving 
bis wife for the brief period of one year, she 
having died in 1865. The latter was a com- 
municant of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Seaman R. Fowler received his education 
in tlie schools of New York City, entering a 
private school first. When a young man he 
was a clerk in a hat store ; and he afterward 
became himself a successful hat merchant, 
his place of business for twenty-one years 
being at 2S0 Grand Street. Possessing the 
qualities which enable a man to succeed in 
whatever line he adopts, Mr. Fowler became 
prosperous, but was eventually forced by fail- 
ing health to give uji the close atmosphere of 
the counting-room. In 1867 he came to Vine- 
land, his present home, and bought a farm, 
hoping that the active open-air life that an 
energetic farmer needs must live would re- 
store his physical energies. What is called 
"fancy farming" did much toward restoring 
Ills wonted vigor, and after eleven years of 
rustic environment he bought in 1878 the 
hotel property in Vineland known as the 
Baker House. This place of public entertain- 



ment is the largest and finest of its kind in 
the locality, and is universally voted equal 
to any in South Jersey outside of the noted 
seashore resorts. The business tact which 
has always characterized Mr. Fowler has en- 
abled him to conduct this enterprise to the 
satisfaction of the public and to his own 
financial advantage. 

While attending to the affairs of his house- 
hold he has also been prominently connected 
with the business interests of his town; and 
he has been since its formation Director and 
Vice-President of the Tradesmen's Bank of 
Vineland, an institution having a capital of 
fifty thousand dollars and a good surplus for 
a new bank. Mr. I-'owler was one of the or- 
ganizers of this bank. Shortly after his com- 
ing to Vineland he was elected Township 
Committee, serving in this capacity for five 
years. He was also appointed Postmaster 
during President Hayes's administration. 
After his four years' term of postal service 
was over, he was elected for five successive 
terms to the office of Tax Collector for Landis 
township. In 1889 he was elected a member 
of the State Senate upon the Republican 
ticket, for which he had always voted. While 
discharging his Senatorial duties he was called 
upon to act upon several committees, among 
which was that of Riparian Rights, South 
Jersey being more especially interested in this 
matter. During this time the abuses known 
as the "City Frauds" were made public, and 
aroused much strong feeling, resulting in the 
passing of the Australian Ballot Bill. The 
two years immediately ft>llowing, the Demo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



crats had the control of the organization of 
the Senate, since which time Mr. Fowler has 
retired from the political arena. He has been 
interested in various affairs concerning the 
welfare of the community in which he has 
cast his lot. He is a Mason, belonging to 
Lebanon Lodge, No. 191, A. F. & A. M., of 
Lebanon, N. Y., and is now a member of Vine- 
land Lodge, No. 69, and the chapter. 

Mr. Seaman R. Fowler has married twice. 
His first wife was Miss Emma Hallam, of 
New York, who died leaving three children — 
Edgar S., now of San Francisco, where he is 
engaged in business; Emma May, who mar- 
ried F. M. Cromwell, and died, leaving three 
children; and Charles H., who is a resident 
of New York City. On July 2, 1870, Mr. 
Fowler was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Mary J. Hopkins, of Wolcottville, Conn., who 
is still living. The issue of this marriage 
was one daughter, Minnie H. Powler. 

In the various lines of merchandising, farm- 
ing, hotel-keeping, official work, and legisla- 
tive action Senator I^^owler has sustained that 
keynote which must be struck to insure suc- 
cess - — combined purpose and action. 




"ON. !•:. MILFORD APPELGATE, 

the present Mayor of Bridgeton, was 
born here, December 22, 1857, 
being a son of Maskel W. and Sarah S. 
(Souder) Appelgate. He represents an old 
and respected family of South Jersey. His 
grandfather. Minor Appelgate, a native of 
Allovvay, Salem County, followeil the trade of 



a blacksmith in that place, and died compara- 
tively early in life. 

Maskel W. Appelgate, also a native of Allo- 
way, born April 10, 1834, was quite young 
when he lost his father. Soon after, his 
mother removed with him to Roadstown, this 
county, and there lived until he was in his 
tenth or eleventh year. He then came alone 
to Bridgeton, and set out in life for himself by 
learning the trade of a painter. This calling 
he subsequently followed until 1866, when he 
abandoned it on account of serious injuries 
received by him. Since then he has been 
engaged in the marble business. He is also 
interested in several real estate companies. 
On November 21, 1856, he was joined in mat- 
rimony with Miss Souder, a daughter of Phillip 
Souder, an old and esteemed resident of 
Bridgeton. He is now the father of three 
children — E. Milford, Jennie, and Harriet. 
The latter is now the wife of Reuben C. 
Hunt, a member of the firm of Hunt lirothers, 
dry-goods dealers of Bridgeton. Maskel W. 
Appelgate is an A. F. & A. M., having mem- 
bership in Evening Star Lodge of Bridgeton, 
Brearly Chapter of Bridgeton, and Olivet 
Commandery of Millville, N.J. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Central Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, in which he has 
officiated as a steward since its organization. 

The Hon. E. Milford Appelgate acquired 
his education in the public schools of Bridge- 
ton, graduating from the high school in the 
class of 1874. He then applied himself to the 
marble business in the siiops of his father, 
and by actual experience, mounting the latlder 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



129 



round by round, obtained a thorough under- 
standing of the various stages of that in- 
dustry. In all he engaged in that business 
nearly twenty years, a part of the time as a 
member of the firm, from which he witlidrew 
in 1893. 

Beginning at the time he attained his major- 
ity, Mr. Appelgate has participated very ac- 
tively in local politics, lie entered the polit- 
ical arena as clerk, being elected from Ward 
I. Though that ward was strongly Demo- 
cratic until 1S92, and he was a Republican, he 
was elected from it to the office of City Clerk 
five times. He was next elected City Asses- 
sor, which office he filled for four years. In 
1 89 1 he was appointed Justice of the Peace 
for a term of five years. He has since been 
called upon to perform most of the justice 
trial work in the city of Bridgeton. In 1894 
Mr. Appelgate was the Republican candidate 
for the mayoralty of Bridgeton, and he was 
elected to that office for a term of three years. 
Mr. Appelgate's administration has given gen- 
eral satisfaction. On May 10, 1882, Mr. 
Appelgate was united in matrimony with Miss 
Elizabeth Lawrence, a daughter of George 
Lawrence, of Bridgeton. Three children have 
come of this union; namely, Sara L., Maskel, 
and l-'redrick. Mr. Appelgate belongs to 
the Order of Masons, being a member of 
Evening Star Lodge of that city, in which he 
filled several offices. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and the Knights of Malta. 
In religious faith and sym])athy he is a Meth- 
odist Episcopalian, having membership in the 
Central Church of Bridgeton. Mr. Ajipelgate 



and his family occupy a pleasant residence at 
72 Washington Street. 




ENJAMIN B. WEATHERBY, of 

MillvilK", the largest dealer in fur- 
niture and house furnishings in 
Southern New Jersey, was born in Woolwich, 
Salem County, this State, Jidy 5, 1847. ^^^ 
is a son of the late Benjamin and .Sarali 
(Hurff) Weatherby, and is of English descent. 
His grandfather, Isaac Weatherby, was for 
many years a believer in the doctrines favored 
by William Penn, and was a speaker in tlie 
Eriends' meetings. He eventually became 
converted to the Methodist belief, and was 
well known as a sj^eaker in the Methodist 
gatherings; and from his time ilown to the 
present the family have followed the teachings 
of John Wesley. 

Benjamin Weatherby, son of Isaac, was born 
in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and spent 
his life there and in the adjoining county of 
Salem. The owner of two farms in his native 
county, one of one hundred and seventy and 
one of two hundred acres, he kept from twelve 
to twenty men emjjloyed during the summer, 
and was engaged in farming on such a large 
scale that he was known as the "king farmer" 
of that section. His landing extending to 
the shore, he had a wharf and a sloop to trans- 
port his produce to market, and managed his 
affairs so skilfully that he was one of the 
most successful business men of his day. In 
church matters also he was very prominent, 
being a member in good standing and a class 



130 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



leader of the Methodist church, and for years 
leader in the singing. He died in 1892. His 
wife, who was born near Swedesboro, N.J., 
died when her son, Benjamin B., the subject 
of this sketch, was eight years old. She was 
the mother of the following children: Edith, 
wife of J. Walker Norton, of Camden, N.J. ; 
Ann Elizabeth, who died at the age of forty; 
Sarah, wife of Charles G. Shute, of Swedes- 
boro; Isaac H., a practical and successful 
farmer of the same town; Benjamin B., the 
subject of this sketch: Thomas, a resident of 
Pennsville; and Mary C, wife of Samuel 
Steward, of Swedesboro. 

Benjamin B. Weatherby in his boyhood at- 
tended school for a while at Woolwich. He 
worked about the farm for a number of years; 
but the labor was too heavy for the growing 
youth, and, his health breaking down, he 
went, when twenty-two years of age, to liast- 
man's College at Poughkeepsie, N.Y., de- 
fraying his own expenses, and there obtained 
a good business training. With the consent 
of his father he purchased on October 4, 1873, 
half the interest of V. II. Ware, of Millville, 
who was in business as a furniture dealer and 
undertaker. At the end of five months Mr. 
Ware sold the other half to Aaron Riley. 
The firm name then became Weatherby & 
Siley; and their store, which was on High 
Street, above Pine Street, became the centre 
of a flourishing trade. 

In 1S81 Mr. Weathereby purchased the ex- 
tensive property at the corner of High and 
Main Streets, which included a store with a 
frontage of seventy-eight feet, and built a 



store which had a depth of seventy-four feet 
and a frontage of thirty-four feet, at the same 
time erecting a fine residence. Purchasing 
Mr. Riley's interest, he moved all the stock 
in trade into the new block, which is still one 
of the finest in the city, and gives him an area 
of from ten thousand to fifteen thousand square 
feet, all of which is in use. His stock in- 
cludes carpets, furniture, and queen's glass, 
and is very select and complete. P'or many 
years Mr. Weatherby has been the leading 
undertaker of the locality. Systematic in his 
business ways, he has kept a full and comjilete 
record of the nineteen hundred cases to which 
he has attended, a record which has often 
proved of much value. 

In 1888 he built, a little north of the first 
building he erected, a three-story brick block, 
which has two store fronts on the first floor; 
two dental rooms and two law offices, a room 
for himself, and an office occupied by a jus- 
tice of the peace on the second floor; and on 
the third floor a large hall, intended for lodge 
purposes, but now occupied by fLn"niture. 
Some time after he built a three-story brick 
annex to the building, which was known as 
the Uoughty House before Mr. Weatherby 
took possession of the first floor for six store- 
rooms, which he rents. The second floor of 
this annex has a new hotel dining-room and 
kitchen. The parlor front is ornamented witli 
a handsome veranda of corrugated iron, and on 
the third floor are the bedrooms. The hotel 
is in these upper floors, the entrance offices 
only being on the ground floor, having the en- 
trances, one on High and one on Main Street. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'3' 



A cemented walk circles the entire property. 
Mr. Weatherby now has six new stores on the 
ground floor, and seventy-one large pieces of 
plate glass form an imposing front. He is 
owner of twelves stores in all, and has a half- 
interest in two other stores on Main Street. 
He also owns residential property in the city, 
improved and umimprovccl, and real estate in 
Ocean City. He is one of the Directors of 
the Ocean City Company and a Director of 
the Millville Board of Trade, of which he was 
for some time Treasurer. 

December 24, 1873, Mr. Weatherby was 
married to Miss Veronica 15. Allen, of Pauls- 
boro, daughter of Henry Allen. Three chil- 
dren have blessed their union: Henry A., who 
is in business with his father; Gertrude, who 
IS attending a model school at Trenton, N.J. ; 
and Charles S., who died October 3, 1892, at 
the age of si.xteen. 

Mr. Weatherby and his family are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church; and until 
ill health caused him to resign he was for 
many years class leader. Trustee, and also for 
some time Secretary of the Board of Leaders 
and Stewards, Secretary of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and Secretary of the Official Board, be- 
sides being active in the l^pworth League, the 
Sunday-school, and on the Music Committee. 



-pN.ARTOX V. SHARP, a member of 
I ^^^ the firm of Sharp Brothers, dealers 
in wall paper, paint, and picture 
frames, in Bridgcton, was born in Maurice- 
town, Cumberland County, October 30, 1866. 



His grandfather, Ephraim Sharp, was a native 
of Haleyville, this county. Daniel Shaip, 
who was born in Haley, October 23, 1838, re- 
ceived his education in the public schools. 
When sixteen years of age he engageil in 
teaching, and substantially followed that pro- 
fession until he came of age. At that time 
he took employment on a vessel between Bos- 
ton, Mass., and Galveston, Tex. Some time 
after, sailing to different ports, he ]nnchased 
an interest in a vessel, and took conuuand <if 
her. His seafaring life lasted four or five 
years, after which he settled in Salem, Salem 
County. After carrying on a grocery store 
for a short time, he sold it out, and became 
principal of the Bank Street School, a posi- 
tion that he held for three years. in 1872 he 
was elected County Clerk for a term of five 
years. At the expiration of his first term he 
was re-elected for a second term. While 
teaching in the Bank Street School, and sub- 
sequently while discharging the duties of 
Clerk of the County, he invested largely in 
oyster-vessels; and the latter years of his life 
were almost exclusively devoted to this line of 
trade. In 1887 he was elected school super- 
intendent of Bridgeton, and lie also held the 
ofifices of Pilot Conunissioner and .Secretary of 
the Board of Trade for a number of years. He 
was a Past Master of Evening Star Masonic 
Lodge of Bridgeton. He married Miss Mary 
B. Compton, daughter of Charles Compton, of 
Mauricetown. Eight children were born of 
the marriage, six of wliom lived to maturity. 
These were: Harry H., Emma C, Barton ]•'. , 
Charles C, Walter M., and Daniel Sharp, Jr. 



132 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Emma C. is the wife of Harry Scull, of 
Bridgeton. Both parents attended the Presby- 
terian church, of which the mother was a 
member. 

Barton F. Sharp, after finishing his educa- 
tion in the West Jersey Academy, for which 
he prepared in the Bank Street School in 
Bridgeton, became assistant agent of the Cen- 
tral Railroad at Port Norris, this county. He 
was afterward employed there as baggage 
master and extra conductor, remaining in the 
service of the Central for nearly five years. 
I"or five months of the five years he was em- 
ployed in the Bridgeton post-office. In 1880 
he secured connection with the railroad, and 
established a store at Port Norris, where he 
sold clothing and boots and shoes until March, 
1893. On March 7 of that year he and his 
brother, Charles C, entered into the partner- 
ship at present uniting them, and have since 
acquired a most profitable patronage. Mr. 
Sharp on November 2, 1888, married Miss 
Leila Vail, daughter of William A. Vail, of 
Port Norris, and became the father of two 
children — Harry and May. He belongs to 
Neptune Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Mau- 
ricetown; to the Idaho Tribe, I. O. of Red 
Men, of Port Norris, of which he was Treas- 
urer for six years; to Port Norris Coun- 
cil, [unidi' Order of United American Me- 
chanics, of whicli he was also Treasurer; and 
to the Mystic Castle of A. O. K. M. C. 

Charles C. Sharp, the senior member of the 
firm of Sharp ]5rothers, was educated at 15ank 
Street .School and the West Jersey Academy. 
He began earning his livelihood immediately 



after leaving school; and his first position was 
in a glass-house ofifice, where he was employed 
for about seven months. He then obtained a 
situation in a drug store, where he remained 
for half a year, after which he entered the em- 
ployment of Charles Scull. In i8gi Charles 
Sharp formed a partnership with Joseph Cress- 
well and Benjamin Master, with whom he pur- 
chased the business of Mr. Scull, and carried 
it on for a year. Mr. Cresswell then withdrew, 
and the firm name was changed to Shaip & 
Master, which was retained until Mr. Sharp 
purchased the interest of his partner and be- 
came sole proprietor. He conducted the busi- 
ness alone for some time, and then took his 
two brothers. Barton F. and Daniel, into 
partnership, forming the present firm of Sharp 
Brothers. 

Daniel Sharp, Jr., received his elementary 
education in private schools, and finished at 
the West Jersey Academy. For three years 
after leaving the academy he filled the posi- 
tion of book-keeper with the Ferracute Ma- 
chine Company, which he joined with his 
brothers in business. 



DWARI) P. C0UNSI-:LL0R, agent of 
the West Jersey I'^xpress Company at 
Millville, was born January 5, 1842, in .Salem, 
Salem County, son of Stephen and Catherine 
C. (Baker) Counsellor. His grandfather, 
]?enjamin Counsellor, was a son of Duysea 
Counsellor, a native of France, who came to 
the United States when a young man. Ben- 
jamin Counsellor was born in this countr)'. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'33 



and the later years of his life were spent in 
Salem. He followed tiie oecupations of 
farmer and teamster. In religious belief he 
was a Baptist, and on the Sabbath he was often 
engaged as a local volunteer preacher. Not 
infrequently in these Sunday ministrations he 
was assisted by Dr. David Jaynes, who was 
one of his warmest friends. Dr. Jaynes then 
followed the trade of a shoemaker, but sub- 
sequently gained quite a reputation as the 
manufacturer of Jaynes's Cherry Pectoral. 

Stephen Counsellor was born in Salem, 
July 3, 1 8 14, and spent the early years of his 
life there. He served an apprenticeship to 
hat-making. That trade proving injurious to 
his health, he served a second apprenticeship 
to the baking business with John Cooper & 
Sons, in whose employment he continued for 
seventeen years. On leaving the Messrs. 
Cooper he engaged in business on his own ac- 
count, and at the time of his death was the 
oldest baker in Salem County, lie took no 
special interest in political affairs, but was 
prominently identified with certain fraternal 
orders. He was a charter member of Alloway 
Tribe, No. 7, Improved Order of Red Men, 
of Salem, and assisted in the organization of 
the Milh'ille Tribe. During anti-slavery 
days he was a member of the Sons of Liberty. 
His wife, Catherine C. , was a daughter of 
Christopher Baker, who was born in Germany. 
His home was at Carlsruhe, Baden, sixteen 
miles from the city of Baden. The family 
were well-to-do; and he was Burgomaster of 
the town in which he lived, his duties as such 
being similar to those of a mayor in this coun- 



try. In his native land he professed the re- 
ligious belief of his fathers, who were 
Lutherans, but on coming to this country 
he embracetl the l".pisco])al creed. Mrs. 
Counsellor was but twelve years old when she 
came to America with her parents. She bore 
her husband si.K children, all of whom are liv- 
ing except William, the second child, who 
died at an age between thirty and thirty-five 
years. John is still a resident of Salem; 
Mary married Albert Steiner, of Salem; 
Adeline is the wife of Thomas Orton, of 
Denver, Col. ; and Kate married George N. 
Curry, of Saleni. The father died in Septem- 
ber, 1889, and the motiier in Ma}', 1888. 

Edward P. Counsellor, the first-born of his 
parents" children, was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Salem. Being the eldest 
child, the task of assisting his father in the 
bakery fell ui)on his shoulders; and he thus 
became familiar with all the details of the 
business at a comparatively early age. lie 
was so employed until the mitbreak of the 
Civil War. Shortly after he went to Fort 
Delaware, where he had charge of the govern- 
ment bakery until the Rebellion was sup- 
pressed. The fort then coveretl ninety-five 
acres of land; ami chiring a portion of the 
time it held twenty-three thousand prisoners 
of war, which, with the garrison of two thou- 
sand men, made twenty-five thousand to be 
supplied with bread. At the close of the war 
he became connected with the West Jersey 
Railroad Company, first working as baggage 
master on trains and then at Cape May City, 
where he had charge of the e.\[)ress office for a 



>34 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



year. He next went to Sussex County, Dela- 
ware, where he superintended the cutting of 
timber for railroad ties on two thousand, four 
hundred and eighty acres of land, for the use 
of the West Jersey Railroad. In the follow- 
ing summer he returned to Cape May, where 
he held the position of express agent until 
iS68, when he came to Millville, and con- 
tinued in a like position here for eight years. 
He then resigned, and started a bakery, which 
he conducted witii ]3rofitab]e results for four- 
teen years, selling out at the end of that 
time. Since March i, 1890, he has held his 
present position as agent of the West Jersey 
Express Company here in Millville. This is 
one of the most important express offices in 
the southern part of the State, and is said to 
be one of the best managed on the road. 

In November, 1S63, Mr. Counsellor was 
married to Miss Sally K. P^ox, of Salem. 
She is a daughter of Jacob Fox, one of the 
oiliest residents of that town. Mr. and Mrs. 
Counsellor have lost two children, namely: 
Albert, who lived to be foiu" years old; and 
Fredrick, who died wlien but four months 
old. Their only living child is lulward Dun- 
ham, born March 2, 1873, who is now em- 
ployed in the supervisor's office at Woodbury, 
N.J., and who, December 23, 1895, was mar- 
ried to Miss lunily D. Troth, of Millville. 
Mr. Counsellor takes a keen interest in school 
matters, and has served on the .School Board 
for three successive terms of tiiree years each. 
At the organization of the Columbian Build- 
ing and Loan Association he was chosen 
Treasurer, ami is still serving iu that capac- 



ity. He is a member of Millville Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, and of Alloway Tribe, 
No. 7, Improved Order of Red Men. He and 
Mrs, Counsellor attend and supjiort the P2pis- 
copal church, in which they are often chosen 
to serve on committees. 




EWIS H !•: N R Y D O W D N E Y, of 

Bridgeton, now retired from active 
occupation, was one of the most 
energetic of men, both in business and jioliti- 
cal life, in his earlier )'ears. He was born 
in Roadstown, this county, April 4, 1821, 
son of Henry and Cynthia (Reed) Dowdney. 
Nicholas Dowdney, his paternal grandfather, 
who was a native of F^ngland, born June i, 
1736, emigrated to this country when a )'Oung 
man, and settled on a farm in Burlington 
County. 

Henry Dowdney, whose birth occurred 
March 29, 1781, grew up on his father's farm, 
receiving such education as was affordetl by 
the common schools of that time. Wlien he 
was nineteen years okl he applied himself to 
learn the hatter's trade. Having accom- 
plished this purpose, he bought a farm; and on 
a part of it he erected a convenient workshop. 
Here for a long time afterward lie devoted 
tlie winter montiis to hat-making and llie rest 
of tile year to the care of his farm. He con- 
tinued to manufacture hats until 1846, after 
which he spent the remainder of his life in re- 
tirement. He died in 1863, at the age of 
eighty-two years. His wife, Cynthia, was a 
daughter of Lewis Reed, of Millville, this 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



135 



county. He married her January 3, 1805, 
and they had eight children. These were: 
John, I'^lizabeth, Margaret, Jane, Lewis, 
Eveline, Lewis H., and Sarah A. Lewis 
died when six months old; Elizabeth married 
Henry L. Benner, of Philadelphia; Margaret 
married William P. Seeley, of Bridgeton; 
Jane married Thomas J. Yarrow, M.D., of 
AUoway, Salem County; Eveline married 
William L. Gibson, of Philadelphia; and 
Sarah A. married J. W. Jernion, also of Phil- 
adelphia. Both parents attended the Baptist 
church in Cohansey, Salem County, the mother 
being a regular member. 

Lewis Henry Dowdney, in aiUrition to the 
education he received in the public schools of 
his native town, had the further advantage of 
a course in a select school of Philadelphia. 
He remained at home until his marriage, when 
he engaged in farming on his own account. 
This occupation he forsook in 1S52, and 
bought the stage-coach line then maintained 
between Bridgeton and Salem. lie conducted 
the line successfully for about four years, and 
then purchased the line between Bridgeton 
and Philadelphia. He had carried on this 
line for several years, when, in 1S62, the 
railroad was built, and the business^ was 
ruined. In 1 S64 he was appointed railroad 
messenger for the United States mails. From 
this position, after serving two years, he was 
ousted because of his outspoken disapproval of 
Andrew Joiinson's administration. He then 
purchased a farm, which he cultivated for the 
next two years. After that he was passenger 
conductor on the Bridyeton & Port Norris 



Railroad for six years, subsequently becoming 
superintendent of the same road after it had 
changed hands, and had become known as the 
Cumberland & Maurice River Railroail. He 
retained this position for about fourteen years, 
his connection with the road ending with its 
sale in 1888, when he retired from active 
business. 

As an earnest member of the Republican 
party Mr. Dowdney has always taken a lively 
interest in politics. A man of strong convic- 
tions and well able to account for the faith 
that was in him, he was very popular, and was 
often honored by election to public ofifice. In 
i860 he was elected County Sheriff, which 
office he held for three years. The First Dis- 
trict of the county sent him in 1873 to the 
General Assembly. His record in the legis- 
lature was so satisfactory that his re-election 
in 1874 was a foregone conclusion. Then in 
1887 he was elected Collector of City Taxes, 
and was re-elected to that im[)oitant office for 
the four consecutive terms following. 

On January 4, 1844, ^^^- Dowdney was 
united in matrimony with l^lizabeth, daughter 
of Philip Eithian, of Roadstown. They had 
one child, Ella B., whose death by scar- 
let fever at the age of two years has been 
the greatest affliction of their marrietl life. 
Mrs. Dowdney is a member of the Presby- 
terian church, which both attend and su])- 
port. Calmly enjoying in the society of 
his wife the rest he has so well earned. 
Mr. Dowdney occasionally recalls the past 
with a vivid story of the stirring scenes he 
has passetl through. 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




HE GILLAMS, originally a pure Saxon 
family, were settled in England, in 
the county known as Essex, long before the 
Conquest, which occurred in the year 1066. 
Their wealth and power were great. The 
fortune, when it reverted to the Crown, 
amounted to more than seventy millions of 
dollars; and the presence of a ducal coronet 
in the family crest, attest to their rank and 
importance. 

The blazoning of the Gillam coat of arms is 
as follows: A field sable; on a chevon, or, 
between three dolphins, embowed, proper, as 
many Ijowers, vert. Crest, Out of a ducal 
coronet, or, a dragon's head, proper. Motto, 
"Animo et fide, " which, translated, is "By, 
or with, courage and faith." 

Early in the seventeenth century, PETER 
GIELAM, the second son of the first house, 
came to America, and settled in New York 
city, then called Manhattan. He had three 
sons, — Peter, Henry, Ezckial, — and four 
daughters. 

Before the war of the Revolution began, the 
eldest son died; and the youngest son, — 
Ezekial, — had removed to Morristovvn, N.J. 
He, at once, joined with Washington, in de- 
fence of the Colonial government. Henry, 
the second son, remained loyal to the King, 
and became a Tory, ultimately having to take 
refuge in Canada. 

When Morristown was threatened l)y the 
British Army, the inhabitants packed all of 
their valuables into the church; and, when 
the village was taken and sacked, the church, 
with its contents, was burned. This occur- 



rence destroyed the records of the Gillam fam- 
ily in this country, — the one legal link re- 
quired to prove heirship to the original 
English possessions, held in Chancery, upon 
the extinction of the eldest branch. The 
fortune has, from default of heirs, reverted to 
the Crown. 

EZEKIAL GILLAM, born September 13, 
1 75 1, was married July 24, 1774, to Eunice 
Parkhurst, — born August 31st, 1755. They 
had four sons, — Henry, David, Micah, Ezek- 
ial, — and four daughters, — Sarah, Mima, 
Phebe and Mary. 

MICAH GILLAM,— born Oct. 22, 17S5, 
— was married March 28, 18 16, to Margaret 
Moffat, — born March 23, 1790. They had 
three sons, — Marcus, Alexander Moffat, and 
Ezekial, — and six daughters, — Lucilla S., 
Mary Jane, Angeline, Nancy Agnes, Sarah 
and Margaret. 

Micah Gillam was a fine type of the Saxon- 
English gentleman; and was universally re- 
spected for his integrity and honor. He was 
gifted with great inventive talents, and ap- 
plied them to many useful purjioscs. He 
served in the war of 1812, against Great 
Britain, for which he received a pension from 
the United States Government, until his 
death, which occurred Oct. 10, 1866. He 
was a consistent member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

MARCUS GILLAM born in Cayuga, 
N.Y., June 22, 1820, was married March 12, 
1845 to Sallic Maria Manley, born in Troy, 
Pa., Oct. 2, 1826. They had four sons, — 
Manley Marcus, Ernest Marion, Alexander 




MANLEY MARCUS GILLAM. ERNEST MARION GILLAM. 

MARCUS GI LLAM . 

ALEXANDER MOFFAT GILLAM. SCOTT LINCOLN GILLAM. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFA'IEW 



' >7 



Moffat, Scott Lincoln, — and three daughtefs, 
— -Charity Margaret, who died in infancy; 
Charity Margaret and Constance Lctticc. 

Marcus Gillam was a model youth; a dis- 
tinguished scholar, both in the arts and 
sciences; while his literary taste and his 
genius in the line of inventive mechanics was 
something phenomenal. He was a grand 
example of Christian earnestness, and, when 
young, he accepted the creed of the Presby- 
terian Church ; but, as he studied the Script- 
ures for himself, he came to believe that the 
New Testament should be the only sjoiritual 
guide, and he then became an influential mem- 
ber of the Society known as "Disciples of 
Christ." 

The criticism of his personality, made by 
Dr. Silas I-'. Sheppard, a personal friend, wlio 
was one of the revisors of the latest transla- 
tion of the Bible, was: "Marcus Gillam was 
one of God's noblemen." Physically, he re- 
sembled his mother's family, being tall and 
gracefully proportionetl : while his love of Nat- 
ure, inherited from her, was almost a passion. 

At the outbreak of the war of the Rebellion, 
he was urged to accept the first lieutenancy of 
the first company of volunteers raised in his 
town; but he declined, from conscientious 
motives. lie saw that many capable men 
could only be induced to enlist if a rank were 
conferred. Subsequently, he enlisted as a 
private in the 141st Regiment, Company I., 
N.Y. Inft. Vols. He soon regretted his con- 
scientious scrujiles, when he realized that 
thousands of men met their deaths, who, with 
less brutal and ignorant officers, in command. 



would have lived to return to their homes. 
He served with General Sherman's army, dur- 
ing its terrible march from "Atlanta to the 
Sea;" doing much of the official writing for 
the officers of his company. The hardships 
and starvation entailed by those months of 
misery, destroyed his previously robust con- 
stitution, and he died August 5th, 1865, on 
the twenty-second day after his return to his 
family at the close of the war, in the forty- 
fifth year of his age. 

His mother, MARGARET MOFFAT 
GILLAM, was of Scotch descent, her family 
belonging to Atinandale. Their coat of arms 
is, — "A field sable, with a saltire and chief 
argent. Crest, A cross crosslet, fitchee, 
gules. Motto, "Spero Meliora," translated, — 
"I hope for better things." The Crest com- 
memorates the service of a powerful chief, 
with his retinue of vassals, on the Crusades to 
Palestine, in the Twelfth Century. Her 
grandfather was named ALEXANDER 
MOFFAT. 

Her father,— H UGH MOFFAT, the second 
son, — when a youth, came to America, just 
before the war of the Revolution began; and, 
he was one of the first to enlist, as a private, 
in the Colonial army. He was, soon after, 
taken prisoner, and shut up in the "Old 
Sugar House," with many more, where he 
nearly died from starvation, as history tells 
us that many of them did. Hut he never re- 
covered from the effects of the imprisonment; 
and, in recognition of his service, six hundred 
acres of land were granted to him l)y the 
Government, situated on the Eastern side of 



J38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Cayuga Lake, in New York. He married 
Phebe Comfort, of Orange Co., N.J., and they 
had four sons, — Hugh, John, Thomas, Alex- 
ander, — and two daughters, — Margaret and 
Nancy. 

In character, Hugh Moffat was singularly 
upright and conscientious. To a pride of 
birth was added a refined taste in literature, 
which gave an elevated, religious tone to his 
productions, although his sympathetic temper- 
ament relieved them from seriousness. He 
liied in his eighty-sixth year. 

Marcus Gillam's wife, — .SALLIE M. 
MAN LEY GILLAM, belongs to a very dis- 
tinguished ancestry, in both paternal and ma- 
ternal lines. The MANLEY family is one 
of the most ancient of the landed gentry of 
England, the founder having been a com- 
panion in arms to William, the Conqueror, 
and accompanied him from Normandy to the 
Conquest of England, in 1066. His name ap- 
pears on the "Battell Abbey Roll," which is 
an official list of those gentlemen-knights, 
who attended William at that time. He was, 
also, a knight-leader on the first Crusade to 
Palestine, to recover the Holy Sepulcher from 
the Infidels; which ended in 1099. In 
memory of this, the family bear, as a crest, a 
Saracen's head. 

ROGER MANLEY was established in 
county Chester, in the time of Henry II., in 
I I 54, where his descendants continued to re- 
side for many centuries; and, about the year 
1520, they removed to Erbistock, county Den- 
bigh, Wales, a property which yet belongs to 
the family. 



In the reign of James I., SIR RICHARD 
MANLEY (who is mentioned in the "Life 
of Lord Clarendon), was Controller of the 
Household to Henry, Prince of Wales, and a 
member of the Board of Green Cloth. 

In the reign of Charles I., SIR FRANCIS 
MANLEY, of Erbistock, was one of the 
Judges of Wales. His son, CORNELIUS 
MANLEY, was made Constable of Harleigh 
Castle, by Charles II., and his brother, SIR 
ROGER MANLEY, was a Captain in the 
King's Regiment of Guards, and Governor of 
Languard Fort. The Second brother of Sir 
Francis Manley,— JOHN MANLEY, ESQ., 
— was a Major in Cromwell's army; after- 
wards, Member of Parliament and Postmaster 
General, in the reign of William HI. And 
/lis eldest son, JOHN MANLEY, Esq., was 
Member of Parliament and Surveyor General 
to Queen Anne. 

The family estates are situated in the 
counties of Chester, Denbigh, Stafford and 
Oxford. The coat of arms is blazoned as fol- 
lows: On a field, argent, a dexter hand, 
couped and erect, sable, within a bordure, 
engrailed, sable. Cnst, A Saracen's head, 
affrontee, proper, wreathed about the temples, 
argent and sable. Motto, "Manus haec inimica 
tyrannis," which signifies: "This hand is an 
enemy to tyrants." 

From this old and powerful family, the first 
emigrant to the new world was JC^HN MAN- 
LEY, Esq., the third son, of the first house, 
in the year 1755; he, ultimately, settling in 
the Connecticut river valley. His eldest son, 
SYLVESTER MANLEY, born 1760, mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'39 



lied Anna Perkins; and their residence was 
in Hartford. They had seven sons, — Syl- 
vester, John, Darius, Thomas, Hubiiel, Asa, 
George, — and four daughters, — -Mary, Nancy, 
Julia, and Chloe. 

DARIUS IMANLEY, the third son,— 
born July 21, 1788, was married May T, 1809, 
to Abigail Phelps,— born Jan. i, 1794. 
They had five sons, — Darius Randolph, Abel 
Sylvester, Charles Gilbert, Frederick Gilson, 
John,^ — and three daughters, — Abbie Ann, 
Almira, and Sallie Maria. The last named 
became the wife of Marcus Gillam. 

After the death of Abigail Phelps Manley, 
Darius IManley married Susannah Loomis, 
born Dec. 4, 1790. They had one son, 
Kbenezer Loomis, — ^and a daughter, — Susan 
Sophia. 

In the Spring of 1824, Darius Manley, hav- 
ing purchased a large section of land in Troy, 
Penn., removed thither with his family from 
Hartford, Conn. He was the most distin- 
guished member of the Community; and his 
courtly grace of demeanor and polished 
scholarship gave him a precedence, indepen- 
dent of his noble birth, which advancing age 
but augmented, until his death, which oc- 
curred Aug. 22, 1862. He was a member of 
the Presbyterian church. 

His wife, ABIGAIL PHLLPS MAXLILV, 
belonged to a line of royal origin. The tra- 
ditional records of her family prove that she 
was lineally descended from the Actii, a 
noble, early-distinguished Roman family (the 
same from which Victoria, Queen of Great 
Britain and Ireland, and Empress of India 



traces her descent), which left Rome long be- 
fore the time of the lunperors (Julius Caesar, 
the first Roman eniix'ror began liis reign 
nearly yT, years before Christ), and settled at 
Este, in the Northern part of Italy, between 
Verona and Padua. 

From the end of the Fourth Century this 
noble and princely faniil)' may be distinctly 
followed. The title was MARQUIS OF 
ESTE. 

About the middle of the Twelfth Century, 
the family was divided into three branches, o( 
which the first was called Guelf. These three 
lines were united in Henry Leo, or Lion, the 
son of Henry IV., Duke of Bavaria, who was 
descended in a right line from the princes of 
the house of Este, and who had married his 
kinswoman, Gertrudis, daughter of the Em- 
peror Latharius, as //is father had married 
Wufheldis, princess of Saxony. 

Henry Leo received from the Emperor 
Barbarossa the city and country of Hanover, 
on the Lein, together with extensive posses- 
sions on the Hartz, in the year 1 156 (here the 
spelling of the name was changed to Guelphs). 
He married, for a second wife. Princess 
Matilda, daughter of Henry II., of luigland 
(it is from this marriage that Queen Victoria 
derives her first claim to the British throne). 
About the Thirteenth Century, this branch of 
the Guelphs made a removal into the southern 
part of England, after a first settlement in 
Wales, where the name was again changed to 
Phelipp. The first to be noted is 

THOMAS PHELIPP, armigcr, who was a 
land-owner and resident at Montacute, county 



I 40 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Somerset in 1480. He left two sons, — 
Richard, his heir, and Thomas. He is 
buried, with his wife, Agnes, at Montacute. 
The elder son, 

RICHARD FHELIP, Esq., of Montacute, 
and Charborough, county Dorset, was Eschea- 
tor for Somerset and Dorset, and Member of 
Parliament in the reign of Henry VIII., and 
for Dorset, when Philip and Mary succeeded. 
He left, by Emalyn, his wife, Thomas, his 
heir, William, and Edith, and was succeeded 
by his elder son, 

THOMAS PHELIPPS, Esq., of Monta- 
cute, who left by Elizabeth, his wife, four 
sons and two daughters. The eldest son, — 
John, of Corfu Mullen, Dorset, — was Member 
of Parliament for Poole; and the second son, 
— Thomas, — settled in Harrington, Somerset. 
{His son, — Thomas, — was knighted and then 
created a baronet. The title became extinct 
with the third baronet). 

SIR EDWARD PHELIPPS, Knight of 
Montacute, — the third son of Thomas 
Phelipps, Esq., — was Master of the Rolls, 
Chancellor to Henry, Prince of Wales, and 
Speaker of the House of Commons. He built 
the mansion at Montacute, county Somerset, 
one of the finest specimens of 'J'udor architect- 
ure in luigland. He left, by his first wife, 
Margaret Newdigate, three sons, — Robert 
(Sir), his heir; Richard and P'rancis. 

SIR ROBERT PHELIPPS, Knight of 
Montacute, Member of Parliament for Somer- 
set, incurred the displeasure of his King, by 
his speeches in Parliament, and was im- 
prisoned in the Tower. He had, with four 



daughters, two sons, — Edward, his heir, and 
Robert, who was Chancellor of the Duchy of 
Lancaster. Sir Robert was succeeded by his 
elder son, 

EDWARD PHELIPS, Esq., of Monta- 
cute, Colonel in the Royal Army, who 
suffered much from his attachment to the royal 
cause, all of his estates being sequestered. 
He married Ann, daughter of Sir Robert Pye, 
and had, with one daughter, seven sons, — Ed- 
ward (Sir>, his heir, Robert, Thomas, George, 
Richard, John and William. Colonel Phelips 
was succeeded by his eldest son, 

SIR EDWARD PHELIPS, Knight of 
Montacute, who left by his second wife, Edith 
Blake, three daughters, and was succeeded by 
his nephew, — the son of his brother John, — 

EDWARD PHELIPS, Esq., of Monta- 
cute, Member of Parliament for Somerset. 
He married, successively, Ann and Elizabeth, 
the first and second daughters of his uncle. 
Sir Edward Phelips, whose estates he in- 
herited. 

The family coat of arms is Ijlazoned as fol- 
lows: On a field, argent, a chevron, gules, be- 
tween three roses of the last, seeded and 
leaved, proper. CRESI\ A square beacon, 
or chest, on two wheels, or, filled with fire, 
proper. SUP PORTJiRS, Two lions, ram- 
pant guardant, gules. MO 'I TO, "Pro aris et 
focis", which translates " I""or our altars and 
homes.". 

May 30, 1630, about ten years after the 
landing of the Mayflower [lilgrims, at Plym- 
outh, WILLIAM PH]-:LIPS, ESQ., from 
the borough-town of lixeter, county Devon- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



141 



shire, England, with his wife and four sons, — 
William, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Joseph, — 
landed at Boston, from the "Mary and John", 
a British vessel of four hundred tons burden, 
Captain Squeb, master. 

They resided at Dorchester, near Boston, 
for about five years. Nov. g, 1630, he was 
chosen member of the first jury empanelled in 
the colony; September, 1631, he was chosen 
constable of Dorchester; May g, 1632, he was 
one of two Commissioners for the Dorchester 
Plantation, appointed to confer with the Gen- 
eral Court (Legislature) on tiie advisability of 
raising a public stock; March 4, 1633, he was 
appointed by the General Court to be one of 
the commissioners to set bounds between Bos- 
ton and Roxbury; May 14, 1634, he was a 
member of the General Court, held at ]5oston, 
and was appointed one of four commissioners 
to certify to the next General Court, whether 
Boston should have convenient enlargement at 
Mount Wollaston; May 16, 1635, he was a 
member of the General Court, held at New 
Town (now Cambridge), and established the 
bounds between Hingham and Weymouth. 

Oct. 15, if)35, William Phelips, E.sq., led 
a company of some sixty individuals, into the 
wilderness of the Connecticut river valley, 
where they founded the town called Windsor. 
March 3, 1636, the General Court, held at 
New Town, appointed him one of four Com- 
missioners of the Peace, at Windsor, to govern 
the people (this being the first year that such 
officers served in the Colonial settlements). 
In 1636, he was a member of the first court 
hckl in Connecticut. He was a magistrate 



from 1638 to 1643. In 1643, he was foreman 
of the first grand jury held in Connecticut; 
and was a deputy in 1645, '46, '47, '48, '4g 
'51 and '57. In 1658, he was again appointed 
magistrate, which office he held for four years, 
thereafter, as well as many other offices of a 
similar character. A stuily of the New Eng- 
land Colonial records show that William 
Phelips, Esq., was one of the most influential 
and respected in the colonies; and, to quote 
from Dr. Ileniy R. Stiles's History of Wind- 
sor, Conn., '■ William Phelips was an excel- 
lent, pious, and uiiright man, both in public 
and private life; being, truly, a pillar in 
church and State ", etc. 

Soon after coming to this new world, tlie 
wife of William Phelips died; and, in 1635, 
he married Mary Dover, an English woman 
who had been a member of the same church 
with him, — that of the Rev. John Farnham, — 
In Plxeter, England. By her he had one 
son, — Timothy, — and a daughter, — Mary, — 
both born at Windsor, Conn. 

WILLIAM PHELIPS, Esq., died at 
Windsor, Conn., July 14, 1672. Mary 
Dover Phelips, died Nov. 27, 1675. 

TIMOTHY PHELIPS, fifth son of Will- 
iam Phelips, only son by Mary Dover Phelips, 
— born Septemjjcr i, i63g, — married Mary 
Griswold, May ig, 1661. They iiad twelve 
children. He died in I7ig. 

TIMOTHY PHELIPS, eldest son of Tim- 
othy and Mary Griswold Phelips, — born Nov. 
I, 1663, — married Martha Crowe, Nov. 4, 
1686. 

CORNELIUS PHELPES, fourth child of 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Timothy and Martha Crowe Phelips, — born 
March 5, 1698,— married Margaret Dewey, 
Jan. 18, 1722. 

CORNELIUS PHELPES, third child of 
Cornelius and Margaret Dewey Phelpes, born 
July 16, 1726, — married Hannah Calkins, 
Nov. 16, 1747. 

SYLVENUS PHELPS, eldest child of 
Cornelius and Hannah Calkins Phelpes, — 
born May 28, 1749, — married Zeruiah Swet- 
land, Dec. 13, 1760. 

ABEL PHELPS, fourth child of Sylvenus 
and Zeruiah Swetland Phelps, — born Feb. 2, 
1764, — married Susannah Phelps, March 13, 
1786. 

ABIGAIL PHELPS, third daughter of 
Abel and Susannah Phelps, — born Jan. i, 
1794, — married Darius Manley, May i, 1809, 
and was the mother of Sallie M. Manley 
Gillam. 



The war of the Rebellion came as a death- 
blow to the business interests in which Marcus 
Gillam was engaged; and he saw the terrors of 
poverty coming upon his delicate wife and 
tender chilch'cn, even as he left them, at the 
call of duty and honor. His entire resources 
were ventured in the development of one of 
his inventions; and, only a calamity so wide- 
spread as war, with its wholesale deaths, and 
destruction of property, could have affected 
his security. 

At tlie close of the war, his widow, — Sallie 
M. Manley Gillam, — was left with an im- 
])overished fortune, feeble health, and six chil- 
dren, half of whom were helplessly young. 



Her courage and devotion at that agonizing 
time, are as a halo of glory about her noble 
head. Asking no favor from the many 
friends, upon whom she had the claims of kin- 
dred, she withdrew into a land of strangers, to 
a new settlement, — situated in the southern 
portion of New Jersey, — called Vineland. 

MANLEY MARCUS GILLAM,— her 
oldest child, — took his place in the woild of 
affairs, in 1862, — his sixteenth year, — when 
he went to Washington, D.C., on duty in the 
Quartermaster's Department. He was there 
nearly two years, and took part in the defense 
of that City at the time of Early's raid, in 
July, 1863. 

Of the pure Saxon type, he is, in appear- 
ance, in disposition and in talents a typical 
Gillam. His passion for learning anything 
and everything is intense; while his facility 
for expressing his ideas picturesquely, or with 
the flowing melody of rhyme, is remarkable. 

After a commercial course at the Ames Col- 
lege, Syracuse, N. Y., he kept the business 
books for a Vineland lumber firm, for some- 
time. As soon as he was eligible, many 
offices of honor and trust were conferred u|ion 
him l)y his townsmen, until he left the jilace 
to widen his field of action. He had been 
a devoted son, and had fulfilled the duties of a 
father to his brothers and sisters. 

His journalistic career began as a stenog- 
rapher, in 1870, for the Pinkerton Detective 
Agency, of PhUadelphia. Late in 1871, he 
went to Boston, Mass., as private Secretary to 
a Commercial Agency, where he remained 
until the spring of 1872. From that time he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'43 



reported the proceedings of the State Legis- 
lature for the "Daily News," until August, 
1872, when he joined the staff of the "Boston 
Post". Early in 1873, he became the City 
Editor of that jjaper, holding the position 
until 1879, when he resigned to try New 
York journalism, on the "Star" and "Trib- 
une". In March, 1879, he was a member of 
the editorial staff of the "Philadelphia 
Record " and a few months later became the 
Managing Editor of that paper, a position 
which he relinquished Dec. 9, 1886, to be- 
come the Advertising Manager for the great 
retail business of John Wanamaker, of Phila- 
(K'l[)hia. This position was resigned in 1895 
to accept a similar one with Hilton, Mughes 
& Co., successors to A. T. .Stewart, in New 
York city. At present, he is the General 
Manager of the entire business of that firm. 
He is a tireless and successful amateur fisher- 
man, handling a rod and fly with masterly 
skill. 

He was married, July 21, 1872, to Alice M. 
Goodell, and they have had three sons, — Man- 
ley Marcus, who died in infancy, Arthur Lin- 
coln, Walter Ernest, — antl five daughters, — ■ 
Alice May, liva Maud, Ada Hlaneh, Ora 
Grace, and Iva Rose. 

ERNEST MARION GILLAM, the sec- 
ond son, is a Manley in type. Of a chivalric 
generosity and honor, his tastes are, also, 
characteristic of his knightly ancestry. No 
])ersonal sacrifice is too great for him to make 
for others; and all is done so gracefully, that 
the depth of the devotion is often obscured to 
the recipient. 



His genius lay in the direction of mathe- 
matics; and, as he grew to manhood, he natu- 
rally drifted into a business which called forth 
those talents. He is, at present, the Com- 
mercial Editor of the "lioston Daily Adver- 
tiser", having held that responsible position 
since 1881 ; and he is, also, a New England 
authority on commercial subjects for the 
leading newspapers of the Country. His 
reportorial work began on the " Boston Post " 
Jan. 7, 1877. In addition to these duties, 
he has, for many years, edited and published 
a daily sheet of commercial intelligence, as 
well as occupied various offices of social dis- 
tinction. 

He was one of the original members of the 
Boston Press Club; antl is an influential mem- 
ber of the brotherhoods of Knights of Honor, 
Lodge 134, of Boston, — and of Powhatan 
Tribe, No. 40, of Improved Order of Red 
Men. As a youth, in 1S71, he helped to 
organize Company D. (afterwards changed to 
Company K.), Sixth Regt., N. G. N. J.; and, 
subsequently, belonged to Company I., Eighth 
Regt. M. V. M., "Woolredge Cadets", for 
three years, from 1876. l-'rom 1886, he was, 
for three years, a member of Company A., 
First l^at., Massachusetts Cavah)-, known as 
the "Boston Lancers". He enjoys all athletic 
exercises, but his favorite recreations arc gun- 
ning and yachting. 

ALEXANDER MOFFAT GILLAM, the 
third son, is a singularly-marked example of 
the laws of heredity. In temperament, as 
well as mentally and morally, he is a Phelps; 
the influence of the three other strong blood- 



144 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



currents merely intensifying the characteris- 
tics of that line. 

A close student of Nature, in childhood, 
his powers of observation were still further 
quickened by a practice of woodcraft in youth; 
until, today, he has become a leader, an edu- 
cator, an authority on everything pertaining 
to the development of physical perfection. 
In a nation where gentility is inclined to be 
exjjressed by an effeminate leisure, one who 
elevates the ambition of our national youth to 
a worsliip of manly prowess and grace, per- 
forms but a duty to posterity, in his belief. 
Keen in his observations; graphic in his style 
of delineation; punctillious, to an almost 
Quixotic degree, in his honor, he is a power 
in his generation. 

He began his professional career in 1881, 
as a reporter on the staff of the "Boston 
Post." Dec. 27, 1882, while acting as the 
City lulitor, he was called to Philadelphia, as 
the Editor of Sports for the "Philadelphia 
Record". Here he has faithfully labored to 
elevate the public taste, in both amateur and 
professional athletics, to a manly standpoint. 

While yet a youth, he joined Company K., 
Sixth Regt., N. G. N. J., and completed his 
full five years of enlistment, having been en- 
i-oUed June 20, 1876, and receiving his official 
discharge Dec. 2, 1881. During that time, 
he was among those detailed to go to the de- 
fense of Phillipsburg, N.J., when that town 
was mobbed by railroad strikers in 1878. 

From his earliest years, his skill as a 
marksman has been notable, both in tlie line 
of competitive practice and in the quest of 



game; and he now finds no treatment so bene- 
ficial for mental exhaustion, as a return to the 
physical hardships of those youthful pursuits. 

SCOTT LINCOLN GILLAM was the 
fourth son. In him were united the four dis- 
similar currents of family blood in a peculiarly 
even degree. In every sense of the word, he 
was a genius. Eloquent, logical, analytical, 
epigrammatic, witty, — his promise was, intel- 
lectually, powerful. Noble in asjMration; 
honorable in practice; delicate in his [jercep- 
tions; — death cut short a career begun with 
brilliancy. He died, after an illness of three 
days, Jan. 31, 1883, in the twenty-second 
year of his age, from inflammation of the 
brain. This was developed in the perform- 
ance of his duties as reporter for tlie Boston 
Post, in addition to carrying on a private 
course of studies. 

He had been a member of Compan\' K., 
Sixth Regt., N. G. N. J., from 1880; and it 
was during his membership, that the New 
Jersey Batallion won the prize at the Centen- 
nial celebration of the Battle of Yorktoun 
(1 781-188 1), held at Yorktown, Va., for dis- 
cipline and good conduct, for which each man 
was awarded a bronze medal by the State of 
New Jersey. He was, also, a fine marksman, 
taking medals in comi)etitive trials; and an 
enthusiastic sportsman, being singularly suc- 
cessful in securing the game which he fol- 
lowed. 

That which is mortal of Scott L. Gillam, 
— the youngest of the four noble sons of a 
noble father, — reposes on the beautiful bluff 
of the Cedar Grove Cemetery, in the suburbs 



BIOGRArHICAL REVIEW 



MS 




of Boston. At bis feet, the gently-flowing 
Neponset winds on its silvery way to the sea. 
"When a man lies here, how vain are all the 
]wmps and vanities of the world." O death, 
wliere is thy sting I O grave, where is thy 
vietory I 

"ON. THOMAS WIIITAKER, who 
was Mayor of Millville from 1889 to 
1.S95, was born in Mlnier, Salem 
County, May 30, i860. He is a son of Dr. 
Jonathan S. and Mary (Johnson) Whitaker, 
both natives of New Jersey. His preliminary 
edueation was obtained in the schools of Mill- 
ville, including the high school. After com- 
pleting a more advanced course of stuily at 
Pennington Seminary, being then nineteen 
years of age, he began to read law with James 
H. Nixon, Esq. In his student days he suc- 
cessfully tried a number of cases. In that 
period also he established an insurance busi- 
ness that has since developed into the largest 
of the kintl in Milhille. It now embraces 
fourteen strong companies, and controls a 
large part of the mercantile and dwelling 
risks in the city, besides the life and accident 
policies. He was appointed in 1885 receiver 
of the Millville Fire and Marine Insurance 
Company, an office that is no sinecure, as the 
affairs of this corporation have been in con- 
stant litigation in the higher courts of the 
State. He is also conveyancer of the Colum- 
bian Perpetual Building and Loan Associa- 
tion. 

Much of Mr. Whitakcr's professional work 
has been associated with his political career. 



In 1889 he was first elected Mayor on the 
Democratic ticket. After completing his 
three years' term he was again elected in 
1892, and served till 1895. During his 
mayoialty the city, whose population consists 
largely of glass workers and their sympa- 
thizers, was disturbed by strikes and lockouts, 
caused by the employment of Jewish boys in 
the glass works. His position at that time 
was a trying one, but he proved equal to the 
occasion. He invited the leaders of the strike 
to his office, and by quiet reasoning induced 
them to desist from their parades and return 
quietly to their homes. In this way violence 
was averted, and the strike was satisfactorily 
settled. During his first term, with a Repub- 
lican Council lie nominated for the Police 
Board, with two Republicans, who had previ- 
ously served, two Democrats. The Council 
refused to confirm his nominations, but they 
were afterward carried iiy a few of the Repub- 
lican Councilnien voting witli the Democrats. 
Tiie members dropped from the board biought 
suit against the city for damages, and its case 
went through the Supreme Court and the 
Court of Errors and Appeals. Mr. Whitaker 
as Mayor conducted the case for the city and 
won, and great credit was given him for the 
lirm stand he had taken. The charters of the 
present electric and street railway companies 
were confirmed during his administration, all 
city improvements being favored by him. Al- 
though he was the youngest mayor ever elected 
in Millville, Mr. Whitaker established some 
precedents that have been followed since. 
He began the practice of sending an annual 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



message to the City Council, describing the 
condition of the city, calling attention to it, 
and suggesting improvements. One time, 
while acting as Chairman of a Democratic 
County Convention, the delegates violated a 
long-established usage by unanimously nomi- 
nating him for State Senator. While the in- 
cidenf was a flattering demonstration of the 
esteem in which he was held, it placed him in 
an 'embarrassing position, and he positively 
refused to accept the nomination. He has 
also presided as Chairman of the County Com- 
mittee; and he had the appointment of Post- 
master of the city in Cleveland's second term, 
but preferred to attend to his professional 
work. 

On November 11, 1890, Mr. Whitaker was 
united in marriage with Miss Harriet Ford, 
daughter of Charles Ford, of Camden, N.J. 
He is Past Master of Shekinah Lodge of 
Masons, and belongs to Richmond Chapter 
and Olivet Commandery. He is Past Chan- 
cellor of Ivanhoe Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
also a member of the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle and of the In(le])cndcnt Order of Od<l 
l-'ellows. He and his wife are mcmlnns of 
the Presbyterian church, while he has the 
further tie of President of its ■ Board of 
Trustees. 



YOYMLLIAM S. I'lTIHAN, of the firm 

V^Y^ "'' '''itliian & I'ennell, flour, feed, 

grain, coal, and wood merchants of ]5ridge- 

ton, N.J., was born October 20, I1S52, in the 

city where he now lives. 

Seeley Fithian, the great-grandfather of 



William .S. Fithian, received his early educa- 
tion mostly in the public schools, but was also 
a pupil of Mr. Chaflin, who taught a select 
school in Bridgeton. He subsequently at- 
tended the Philadelphia High School, being 
one of the first students of that institution. 
His son, John Burgin 1^'ithian, was born at 
Oakland Farm near Roadstown. This estate 
has been held by the P'ithians for more than a 
century, and is now owned by Mr. William S. 
Fithian's father, Charles Seeley F"ithian. 

John Burgin Fithian attended the common 
schools of Roadstown, and began to prepare 
himself for the practical duties of life by 
learning the hatter's trade in the town of 
Bridgeton. Some years after his marriage he 
moved to Philadelphia, where for four or five 
years he was in the employment of Dr. George 
I-L ]5urgin. At the expiration of this period 
he went to Millville, where he became man- 
ager of the glass factory of Burgin, Pearsall 
& Wood, remaining there for a number of 
years. He then returned to Philadelphia, 
and established a drug store, but two years 
later entered the employment of lUu'gin & 
Fowler, owners of a glass factor)'. His pre- 
vious experience rendered him especially fit 
to assume the management of glass works, and 
this position he held until his death. He 
married Miss Jane Davis, daughter of Mr. 
! ("harles Davis, and became the father of two 
children — Charles Seeley and P'.leanor M. 

Charles .S. I'itliian came to Bridgeton with 
his father, and was employed for a while in a 
store, which was, no doubt, good practical 
training for him. In 1S45 h*^ established a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



147 



lumber business in partnership with Isaac A. 
Sheppard and Dayton I?. Whitakcr, under the 
firm name of Fithian, Whitaker & Co. This 
continued until 1856, when he sold his in- 
terest to Alexander L. Roberson, and pur- 
chased a farm on the outskirts of Bridgeton, 
which he cultivated for about thirteen years, 
doing other business besides. Mr. Charles 
.S. Fithian being a man of keen foresight and 
much enterprise, he, in partnership with Mr. 
Steen lulwards and William Pogue, estab- 
lished a canning factory in Bridgeton. Here 
the first tomatoes ever canned in this part of 
the country were put upon the market. This 
was before the war, when ventures of the kind 
were not so common as they are now. ]5ut the 
plan was practical, and the demand was im- 
mediate; and a successful business was the 
result. This business was sold to Mr. 
Steen Edwards. A partnership was after- 
ward formed by Charles S. Fithian and Will- 
iam Pogue, and a canning factory was built on 
the corner of Bank Street and living Avenue. 
In 1863 or approximately that date Mr. Fith- 
ian bought out Mr. Pogue's interest, and con- 
ducted the factory under his sole ownership 
for two years, when he sold out to Mr. John 
W. Stout, of New York. 

He then became Secretary and Treasurer of 
the Eastlake woollen-mills, a position he held 
until 1888, when he was elected Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Cumberland National Fire 
Insurance Company. This office' he holds at 
the present writing. He has also held va- 
rious other places of trust. He was elected as 
City Councilman in Ward i (now Ward 4) for 



two years, and was afterward re-elected for 
three more years on the Republican ticket. 
He has been a Director of the Cumberland 
National Bank, a charter member of the Board 
of Trade, has filled the office of Past Grand in 
Cumberland Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Past High Priest of Good 
Intent Encampment. 

In March, 1846, he was joined in wetllock 
to Miss Harriet Newell, daughter of Johnson 
Reeves, of Bridgeton. Seven children were 
born of this union, four of whom arrived at 
maturity, namely: William S., the leading 
subject of this biography; P'rancis Reeves, 
manager of the State Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Camden; Jane Davis; and Alex- 
ander Roberson, who is an attorney. Both 
Mr. and iMrs. Charles S. P'ithian are members 
of the Presbyterian church, of which the for- 
mer has been a Trustee for fifteen years. 

William S. Fithian, the eldest living cliihi 
of his parents, was educated in tlie common 
schools of his nati\'e town and in the West 
Jersey Academy. His constitution was not 
strong during his youth, and he found it nec- 
essary to try the exercise and fresh air that 
farm life affords. He accordingly gave u]-) the 
confinement of the school -room, and took a 
situation on a farm. In si.\ months he was 
sufficiently recuperated to enter Bryant & 
Stratton's Commercial College at Philadel- 
phia, where he completed a course of business 
training. Returning to Bridgeton, he began 
his career as a market gardener, conducting 
a dairy business in connection with Iiis truck 
farm. In 1878 he started on a more a;sthetic 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL RP:VIEVV 



line, and from growing cabbages began to grow 
roses and violets; in other words, Mr. Fithian 
and his brother set up as florists, cultivating 
ornamental plants, flowers, and nursery stock. 
He remained in this branch of horticultural 
effort until 1882, when he established a flour 
and feed store, later adding coal to his stock 
in trade, in which enterprise Mr. Charles S. 
Mulford co-operated as a partner. This firm 
was changed in 1887, when Mr. Mulford 
sold his interest, and was succeeded by Mr. 
S. Frank I'cnnell. The firm of Fithian & 
I'ennell now Ijecame more prosjierous than 
ever. 

Mr. Fithian has been offered the nomina- 
tion to various offices, but has never accepted 
any overtures of this kind, being contented to 
live as a private citizen. Besides his business 
affairs he is largely interested in other things. 
lie is a memlier of Hrcarly Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. ; Cumberland Lodge, No. 35, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is 
Fast Grand; belongs to Fncampmcnt Good 
Intent, No. 15, of whicli he is now Iligli 
Priest; is also a member of Cohansic Trilje, 
Improved Order of Red Men; and belongs to 
Calanthc Lodge, No. 103, Knights of Pythias. 
In religious belief he, like his father, is a 
Presbyterian, and is a Trustee of tlic P'irst 
Church of that denomination in ISridgelon. 

On the 13th of September, 1SS2, Mr. Will- 
iam S. l'"ithian was married to Miss Margaret 
L. Fitliian, a daughter of Mr. Joseph 1'. 
i'ithian, of ]5ridgeton. Two cliildrcn blessed 
this marriage: John Burgin, who dieil; and 
William S., Jr., upon wliom lies the responsi- 



bility of bearing with credit an old and re- 
spected name, which for generations has been 
honored by its representatives. 




HARLES BRANDRIFF CONOVFR, 
of Millville, a leading dealer in dry 
goods and notions, vvas born Sep- 
tember I, 185s, in Port lilizabeth, N.J., son 
of Henry S. and Sarah E. (l?rick) Conover. 
The founders of tliis family came from Hol- 
land. Reuben Conover, the grandfather of 
Charles B., was for some years a resident of 
Cedarville, Cumberland County: but at a later 
period he lived in Millville. He was united 
in matrimony with Miss Rose Cnlp, and be- 
came the father of Henry S. Conover. 

Henry S. Conover was a native of Cedar- 
ville, where he spent his younger days. Later 
he came to Millville, and was employed in the 
glass works. Subsequently he vvas occupied 
in the same business at Port I''lizabetli for 
some time, after which, about 1S57, he re- 
turned to Millville. In 1865 lie moved to 
Bridgeton ; but after two years he came back 
again to Millville, wJicre he has since re- 
mained. Through these changes of residence 
he was employed in the same business, serv- 
ing most of the time as glass blower. He is 
now foreman of his department, whicii posi- 
tion he has filled for some years. He is a 
Republican in politics, while he has never 
sought political honors. He is an old mem- 
ber of the Millville Lodge of Odd p-ellows, 
in which he has served as Past Grand Master. 
His wife, Sarah, was a daughter of Joshua 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



Brick, an old resident of Port Elizabeth, who 
ke])t a general merchandise store. He was a 
son of the Men. Joshua Brick, one of the most 
prominent men in the vicinity, who repre- 
sented his district in the State legislature for 
a number of terms. Mrs. Henry S. Conover 
has had five children, four of whom are living, 
namely: Charles ]?., the subject of this 
sketch; Reuben, a resident of Millville; 
l-'rank, who was drowned at the age of nine- 
teen ; Ada, now Mrs. Frederick Calhoun, of 
this city; and Howard, who is a resident of 
Philadelphia. The parents were members of 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church, in 
which the father officiated as steward for some 
years. The mother died in 1882. 

Charles Brandriff Conover attended the 
public schools of Millville until he was twelve 
years o( age. He was then hired as clerk in 
the boot and shoe store of Joseph R. Wells for 
some time. He spent a few more months in 
school, and was subsequentl)' eniijloyed in the 
gri)cery business by Thomas Wilson until he 
sold out to Wilson & Smith. John Wright, 
druggist, was his ne.xt employer. Later he 
worked for Harris & Cory, grocers, and for 
Mulford & Hogate, wlio kept a general mer- 
chandise store. He had been two years with 
Mulford & Hogate when they o])ened a store 
exclusively for dry goods and notions, and 
placed him in charge of it. This was in 
1877, when he was twenty-one years old. 
Two years after Mr. Conover 0]jenetl a store 
on his own account, in a room twelve feet by 
twenty-five. Ne.xt year he moved into quar- 
ters measuring fifteen by fifty. Three years 



later his rapidly increasing business obliged 
him to take store space in ell form, twenty-five 
feet by seventy-five. In 18S8 he movetl into 
the store he now occupies at 102 High Street. 
This he bought and enlargeil in 1890, making 
it twenty-two feet by one hundred. Since 
then he has taken a new room on the second 
floor, twenty-two by fifty, for a cloak depart- 
ment, with a stairway leading from the main 
store. The building is a two-story brick etli- 
fice, desiralily locateii. I'rom five to eight 
people are employed in it. Mr. Conover 
served the community for three years as a 
member of the Board of lulucation. At one 
time he helped to form a Board of Traile, and 
was its Secretary while it existed. This body 
secured from the national government an ap- 
propriation for river and harbor improvements. 
Mr. Conover is a member of Shekinah Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., and of Richmond Chapter 
and Olivet Connnandery. He is also identi- 
fied with Junior Order of L'nited American 
Mechanics, Fame Council. 

On July 26, 1876, Mr. Conover was united 
in marriage with Miss Clara Ludlam, daughter 
of John C. Ludlam, of Millville. Her pater- 
nal grandfather, who was a ])r()minent man of 
Cape May County, owned many slaves and 
eight or ten vessels. Her father, who was a 
carpenter, came to Millville from Cape May 
Court-house, and married Mary B. Checsman. 
Mrs. Conover is a native of this city. She 
has had four children — Nellie W., Sallie E., 
Frank S., and Charles B., Jr. ]k)th parents 
are members of the l-'irst Church, in whicli 
the father has been a steward for seventeen 



15° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years. Mr. Conovcr is also a teacher in the 
Sunday-school and the Treasurer of the Mis- 
sionary Society. The family residence is at 
310 Pine Street. 




ILLIAM OGDEN, superintendent 
of the Cumberland County alms- 
liouse, was born in Greenwich, Cumberland 
County, N.J., on October 10, 1834, his par- 
ents being Samuel and I'htebe (Elwell) Ogden. 
Jonathan Ogden, father of Samuel, was a na- 
tive of Cumberland County, but removed to 
Illinois, where he passed the latter part of his 
life. 

Samuel Ogden, who was born in 1801 in 
Fairfield, N.J., and who received his educa- 
tion in the district schools of the town, fol- 
lowed through life the occupation of farming. 
In 1825 he was united in marriage with Miss 
Phoebe Elwell, of Gloucester County, New 
Jersey, to whom were born six children, 
n.'imely: Mary E., who was married to Mr. 
Joseph Polk, of Bridgeton, N.J., but who is 
now deceased: Matilda, the wife of Mr. Jo- 
seph B. Wood, formerly a prominent resident 
and blacksmith of Bridgeton; William, above 
named; David ]•'.., assistant suiicrintendent of 
the comity almshouse; Jolin, who resides at 
liuck Neck in r'airfield; and Ivebecca, the 
wife of Mr. Thomas J. Ware, an express agent 
of Vineland, N.J. 

Mr. Samuel Ogtlen was quite prominently 
before the public, having held several local 
offices, inchRJing those of Townsliip Commit- 
teeman and Commissioner of Api)eals. In 



early life a Whig, he was later identified with 
the Republican party. He was a Presbyterian 
in religious belief, being .affiliated with the 
Greenwich Presbyterian Church. He carried 
on farming in different localities. The 
second move he made was on to what was 
known as the Seeley Mill farm, owned by 
Judge Maskel Ware, of Salem, N.J. There 
he remained under one continuous lease for a 
period of nearly forty years. After Samuel 
Ogden's death Judge Ware was heard to say, 
"Mr. Ogden lias lived on my farm for tliirty- 
eight years without a word or ripple; and I 
pronounce him an honest, sober, industrious 
man, second to none in the State of New 
Jersey." 

His good wife, Mrs. Phcebe P]lwell Ogden, a 
very capable woman, unassuming in nature, was 
a devoted mother to her children and a kind 
neighbor, always ready with a helping hand in 
case of sickness. Her death was felt as a 
great loss to the community. 

William Ogden, son of these worthy |iar- 
ents, received his education in the district 
schools of a town located near Greenwich, 
which were taught by the Rev. ICdward D. 
Fendle and Professor Clarkson Sheppard. 
After leaving school he assisted his father on 
the home farm ; and he continued engaged in 
agrictdture till the spring of 1893, when he 
was elected to fill the high office of superin- 
tendent of the county almshouse. That Mr. 
Ogden enjoys the esteem of his fellow-towns- 
men, and that they apiireciate the character of 
his ]niblic service, is shown l)y tlie fact that 
he has since been re-elected to tiie same 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•5' 



position for the two additional terms of 
office. 

On September 3, 1S56, he was united in 
marriage with Miss Kezia K. Sheppard, the 
daiij^hter of William and Sarah Sheppard, of 
Greenwich; and into their home have come 
two children — Eva Dowdney and Belford 
Elwell. Mr. Sheppard was a prominent man 
in his town, and is still remembered by very 
many as an exceedingly kindly neighbor and 
a progressive citizen. Mr. Ogden has held 
several important public offices besides the 
almshouse superintendency, having for nine 
years occupied the position of Clerk of the 
township, and having been Committeeman for 
two years, also Judge and Inspector of the 
Election and Road Supervisor. Mr. Ogden 
compiled the last, the eleventh, government 
census report for his town, and also rendered 
the same service for the tenth census. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Ogden is affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party in politics: and in religious belief 
both he and his wife are Presbyterians, be- 
ing members of the Greenwich Presbyterian 
Church, but not communicants. 



(sffOHN WALLACE WADE, M.D., of 
Millville, N.J., one of the most 
prominent physicians in Cumberland 
County, was born in Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, December 9, 1855. Dr. Wade is of 
Scotch-Irish descent on one side of the house, 
his maternal grandfather, a farmer named 
Dunlap, having come to Lancaster County 
from the north of Ireland. 



His father, John Wesley Wade, was also a 
native of Lancaster County, where he followed 
the carpenter's trade. liefore removing to 
Milhille, however, in ii>6\, he had discarded 
hammer and nails and taken to spade and 
plough. So on coming to the latter place he 
cultivated a farm just south of the town, com- 
monly known as the Feaster farm. He after- 
ward engaged in the meat and butcher busi- 
ness in Millville, and for many years had a 
market there. Mr. John Wesley Wade en- 
listed in August, 1864, in Company C, Thirty- 
eighth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, in 
which he served as Sergeant until the close of 
the Civil War. He belonged to the militia, 
in which he held the rank of First Lieutenant 
after the war; and while living in Millville 
he was elected City Councilman from the 
First Ward to succeed the late Mr. -Lewis 
Mulford. Having no taste for politics, how- 
ever, he resigned his office. 

Mr. John Wesley Wade married Miss Maria 
P. Dunlap, and was the father of eight chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. The sur- 
viving members of this family are: Elizabeth 
J., wife of P'rancis II. Ware, Postmaster of 
Millville; Dr. John Wallace Wade; Joseph 
H., Trustee of the Presbyterian church of this 
city; Benjamin Lincoln, also of Millville; 
P211a, wife of J. Albert Charlesworth, of Mill- 
ville; Lula R., wife of Provie Flanagin, of 
Tuckahoe. Both parents were for many years 
members of the Presbyterian church, and every 
Christian influence was brought to bear upon 
the home life of the famil)' intrusted to their 
care. Mr. Wade died at the age of si.\ty-si.\, 



'52 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on the first day of the year 1894. His wife 
still survives him. 

Dr. Wade has spent the greater part of his 
life in the town where he lives, his parents 
having settled there when he was a child of 
six years of age. As a boy he attended the 
district schools of the vicinity; and between 
terms he often foimd employment that brought 
remuneration, and fixed upon his character 
habits of industry. At ten years of age he 
worked in a glass factory for a while, and was 
afterward employed in a brickyard at that 
lime in operation in the neighborhood. As 
he grew older his vacations were spent in 
different stores, where, as a clerk, he learned 
discipline and the dignity of self-reliance. In 
groceries, meat markets, and butcher shops 
the future student and physician struggled to 
earn an indei>cndence ; and it was in the last- 
named mart that he met his future wife. 
When he was sixteen years old he entered the 
drug store of Dr. Howard E. Peck, an able and 
popular physician of that period; anil here he 
received the impetus toward that ambition 
which he afterward gratified. After three 
years of practice in prescription he entered 
the office of Dr. Peck, with whom he read 
medicine, preparatory to matriculating at the 
Philadelphia University of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, from which he graduated with honor, 
January 3, 1876. This institution had a wide 
reputation at that time, and was considered 
unrivalled. It was afterward closed; and the 
young doctor returned home to find his earli- 
est preceptor dead, and a fine opening for his 
profession in the town. Dr. Peek had died on 



the 17th of April, 1876; and the Philadelphia 
graduate now assumed charge of the drug 
store, and fell heir to the practice awaiting 
the advent of a "new doctor." He continued 
in the drug store for nearly a year, being 
deeply interested in its prosperity from a 
financial point; and in the mean time he was 
building up a large practice. 

But Dr. Wade was not satisfied with medi- 
ocre qualifications. He desired to be thor- 
oughly equip[ied in the profession he had 
chosen for his own, and with this in mind en- 
tered Jefferson Medical College in the autumn 
of 1882. He was graduated at Jefferson in 
the class of 1884, which consisted of two 
hundred and fifteen students. These two 
years were full of hard work and replete with 
experience, for he was in all of the laboratory 
work and hospital parctice, and in addition 
took sex'eral special courses, receiving di- 
plomas in each, namely: the Shoemaker's 
Philadelphia Hospital for Skin Diseases; 
McClelland School of Anatomy and Surgery; 
the Philadelphia Lying-in Charity ; and also 
holding a certificate for four years" attendance 
at the Pennsylvania Hospital. The Doctor is 
a life member of the Ahmini Association of 
Jefferson College. He is a member of the 
Board of Censors of the Medico-Chirurgical 
College of Philadeliihia, one of the most pro- 
gressive institutions in the United .States. 
During the last two years of study he was fre- 
quently in his office, and he attended to his 
patients during the months of vacation. He 
has the largest practice in South Jersey, and 
has been particularly successful in that branch 



BIOGRAPHIC A I, REVIEW 



'S3 



of materia medica called obstetrics. Besides 
being City Physician he is the physician to the 
Board of Health, his life being one of tireless 
activity. 

He married Miss Amy B. Westcott, of 
Millville, on the 20th of June, iSSo. Mrs. 
Wade's father, Mr. Arthur Westcott, was an 
uncle to Judge Westcott, of Camden. 

Dr. Wade is an attendant and supporter of 
the Presbyterian church and a member of the 
Knights of Golden Kagle and of the Imjiroved 
Order of Red Men. His reputation as a phy- 
sician is not more widely known and recog- 
nized than his popularity as a citizen, few 
men having won so much admiration in both 
public and private life. About ten years ago 
he had a handsome residence erected on North 
Second Street, No. 318, in which he has made 
his home since its completion. 



P^REDERIC LUMMIS, a leading 
dentist of Bridgeton, was born in Lum- 
mis Mills, near Cedarvillc, Cumber- 
land County, December 25, 1853, son of John 
O. and Martha (Powell) Lummis. The fam- 
ily, which is of Welsh extraction, traces its 
ancestry back to the early Colonial days. 
The father of Mr. Lummis was a son of 
George Lummis, by his wife, Rachel, who was 
a daughter of John Ogden. The father of 
George was a son of Parson Lummis, whose 
license to marry Hannah Dimant bears the 
date July 5, 1779. Parson Lummis was a 
son of Edward Lummis by his marriage in 
1737 with Margaret, a daughter of the Rev. 



Daniel Elmer. Edward's father was Edward 
Lummis, Sr. , who, born in Ipswich, Mass., 
October 12, 1667, removed to Cohansey, N.J. 
There the latter, before November 3, 1707, 
married Abigail Waistcott (who was still liv- 
ing on October 28, 1738), and he died in 
1740. Samuel Lummis, the father of Edward, 
Sr. , born June 7, 1639, died in February, 
1720. His father was Edward Lummis, born 
in 1606, who came to this country from Wales 
in 1635, settled in Ipswich in or before the 
year 1641, and served in the Pequod War. 

John O. Lummis, father of J. P^rederic, the 
subject of this sketch, a native of Cumberland 
County, born in 1 8 10, was educated in the 
common schools. For the greater part of his 
life he followed the occupations of farmer and 
miller. When a young man he drove a stage- 
coach for some time between Cape May and 
Philadelphia and later between Bridgeton and 
Philadelphia. At one time he was Assessor 
of the district now included in the townships 
of Lawrence and Fairfield. He and his wife 
were members of the Baptist church at Cedar- 
villc, which they helped to found. He died 
in April, 1888. His wife, who was a daugh- 
ter of Henry Powell, of Cedarville, had nine 
children, as follows: George, born March 30, 
1S36; Horace E., born April 28, 1838; 
Henry P., born September 30, 1840; Martha 
E., born November 17, 1842; John O., Jr., 
now deceased, born in 1846; Clarence B., 
born August 12, 1848; Edward F. , born 
March 21, 1851; J. Frederic, the subject of 
this notice; and Lizzie, born February 8, 
1862. Geortre Lummis married Harriet 



'54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Todd, and became the father of three daugh- 
ters and two sons; namely, Martha, William 
T., Sarah Amelia, Harriet, and George, the 
last two dying in infancy. His daughter 
Martha, born in December, 1859, is married 
to Herbert O. Newcombe. His son Will- 
iam T. is the father of one child, Grace, by 
his wife, Martha (Crossley) Lummis, now de- 
ceased. His daughter Sarah Amelia mar- 
ried Milton Laning, since deceased, and has 
two children — George and Lillian. Henry P. 
Lummis successively married Matilda Rolling 
and Agnes Grady, and has by his second wife 
three children — Henry P., Jr., George O., 
and Florence. Martha E. Lummis married Dr. 
Charles T. Bennett, of Woodbury, N.J., and 
has two children — Lillian and Gertrude. 
Iler daughter Gertrude is the wife of Russell 
lUackwood, and has one child, P]rnest. ' John 
O. Lummis, Jr., married Sarah Haines, and 
had four children — Howard, Frank, John 
Milton, and Leslie. Clarence B. Lummis 
married Sarah Thompson, and has five chil- 
dren — Walter T., Clarence Percy, Herbert, 
John Ogden, and Mary Fendell. Edward F. 
I,ummis married Catharine Dare, and has 
three children — Charles William, Martha B., 
and Helen. 

J. Freileric Lummis was reared on his 
father's farm, receiving his education in the 
public schools of CedarviUc. He helped his 
father on the farm and in the mill until he 
was about twenty years of age. Then he went 
to Philadelphia, and took a course in Bryant 
& Stratton's Business College, graduating 
therefrom in 1874. After this he studied 



dentistry in Woodbury with a brother-in-law, 
and subsequently passed an examination in 
that subject by the State Board of Dentistry. 
He entered upon his new profession in Cedar- 
ville, where he opened an office in 1876. 
Subsequently, in 1887, he opened another 
office in Bridgeton. He attended here four 
days of every week until 1888, when he closed 
the office in Cedarville, and thereafter devoted 
his whole time to his Bridgeton office. 

On June 13, 1879, Mr. Lummis was united 
in matrimony with Alice M., daughter of 
William Flower, of Hartford, Conn. The 
marriage was blessed by the birth of four chil- 
dren — Marshall F., Warren C, Alice May, 
and Clara 15elle. The parents are communi- 
cants of the Baptist church, of which Mr. 
Lummis is also a Deacon. He is likewise a 
member of the Heptasoph-P2ureka Conclave. 
The leading dentist of Bridgeton by virtue of 
devotion to his profession, and in the receipt 
of a handsome income from an assured patron- 
age, Mr. Lummis is not unwarrantably re- 
garded as one of the successful men of the 
county and a most creditable product of his 
long line of American ancestry. 



^^•^» 




DWIN CURTIS BIDWELL, M.D., a 
veteran surgeon of the Civil War and 
proprietor of one of the oklest drug stores in 
the city of Vineland, N.J., was born in what 
is now Monterey, Berkshire County, Mass., 
on February 20, 1821, son of Barnabas and 
Betsey (Curtis) Bidwell. 

The recorti of the Bidwell family in this 



^ 




EDWIN C. BIDWELL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'55 



country extends over seven generations before 
reaching Dr. Edwin C, the first progenitor in 
this country being John Bidwell, who settled 
in Hartford, Conn., about the year 1639. He 
was a large land-owner, and also owned a tan- 
nery. His son, John Biilwell, second, was 
Ijorn in Hartford about 1641. He spent his 
life there, and died on July 3, 1692. On 
November 7, 1678, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Sarah Wells, who was born in 
1659, daughter of Thomas Wells and grand- 
daughter of Governor Wells, the seconil 
Governor of Connecticut. .She died in 1708. 
Thomas Bidwell, son of John, second, and 
Sarah Bidwell, was born in Hartford on De- 
cember 27, 1682. He was one of the leading 
merchants of that city. In 17 16, while on a 
voyage to the Barbadoes, he was lost at sea. 
On March 28, 1707, he married Miss Prudence 
Scott, a daughter of Edward Scott, of New 
Haven, Conn. His wife died on February 14, 
1763, having been the mother of five children. 
Adonijah, the youngest, came into the 
world after his father's death, his birth date 
being October 18, 1716. He studied for the 
ministry, and during the e.\pcdition against 
Louisburg, Cape ]5reton, in 174S, he was 
Cha[)lain of the Connecticut Volunteers. He 
was the first settled minister in the town of 
Tyriugham, Mass., now Monterey, where for 
thirty-four years, or until his death on June 
2, 1784, he faithfully preached the gospel in 
the Master's name. He married Miss Jemima 
Devotion, a daughter of the Rev. Ebenezer 
Devotion, whose ancestry is traced directly 
back to Edward HI. of England. Mrs. Je- 



mima Bidwell died on rY'bruary 7, 1771. She 
and her husband were the parents of four 
chiklren. 

Adonijah, sccoiui, their first-born, whose 
birth occurred in Monterey on August 6, 
1761, became one of tiie leading citizens of 
that town. He was frec|uenlly chosen for 
official honors, and served in nearly all the 
town offices, also as a Representative to the 
General Court. His death took place on I'eb- 
ruary 14, 1837. On January 15, 1789, he was 
married to Miss Milliccnt Dench, who was 
born on April 4, 1764, and died July 27, 
i860. Barnabas Bidwell, their fifth child in 
a family of twelve, was born in Monterey on 
March 13, 1796. A farmer by occupation, he 
served as a soldier in the War of 18 12. He 
was married on February 6, 1820, to Miss 
Betsey Curtis, a daughter of Amasa Curtis. 
They had four children, as follows: luhvin 
Curtis; Marshall Spring; Orlando Bird; and 
Adonijah, who lived to be but nineteen years 
of age. The mother died on October 29, 
1862, the father on April 8, 1882, twenty 
years later. 

Edwin Curtis Bidwell received his early ed- 
ucation in the public schools of Monterey, 
and fitted for college at Leno.x Academy. He 
matriculated at Williams College, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1841, and 
soon after entered the medical department of 
Yale University, completing his course there 
in 1844. He was then at Otis, Mass., for 
about a year, going from there to Salisbury, 
Conn., where he engaged in practice for two 
years. At the end of that time he removed 



'56 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to Keene, Coshocton County, Ohio, and after 
five years of successful practice in that town 
he went to Ouasqueton, Buchanan County, 
la., where he remained for six years. His 
health having become impaired, he then re- 
turned to Massachusetts, and was engaged in 
practice in Middlefield until the beginning of 
the Civil War. In 1861 he entered the army 
as a Surgeon in the Thirty-first Massachusetts 
Regiment, serving until 1S65. The following 
year he came to Vineland, where in the sum- 
mer of 1866 he opened a drug store, which 
has since been conducted under the firm name 
of Bidwell & Co. During the first few years 
he was engaged to a limited extent in the 
practice of his profession, but of late years he 
has devoted his entire attention to the drug 
business. 

On February 29, 1844, he was joined in 
marriage with Miss Elizabeth Ward, a daugh- 
ter of John Ward, of Sheffield, Mass. Two 
of their children lived to maturity, namely: 
John Ward; and Elizabeth, now deceased. 
The mother died on January 25, 1850. On 
October 29, 1850, Dr. Bidwell was again mar- 
ried, this time to Miss Eveline Rebecca Far- 
well, a daughter of Zohar Farwell. By his 
second wife he has one son, Charles Sumner. 
Mrs. P'veline R. F. Bidwell died on July 31, 
1855. On November 24, 1856, Dr. Bidwell 
married his third wife, Isabella Calder Gib- 
son, a daughter of the Rev. Hugh Gibson. A 
son and daughter were born of this union — 
Isabella Jeanette (deceased) ; and Edwin 
Hugh, of Vineland. Their mother died No- 
vember 20, 1888. 



While residing in Iowa, Dr. Bidwell served 
as a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Iowa State University, and in New Jersey 
from 1868 to 1 88 1 he served as medical ex- 
aminer for the pension office. Dr. Bidwell 
contributed many articles to medical jour- 
nals in the early part of his professional life. 
Later he became interested in the study of 
microscopic fungi. In 1881 the fungus of 
the black rot of the grape, Lccstadia Bid- 
wellii, was discovered by him, and named for 
him by Professor Ellis. In politics Dr. Bid- 
well was an anti-slavery man from the begin- 
ning, and he is an ardent Republican still. 




<i) 



HOMAS S. SIMMONS, the oldest fur- 
niture dealer and undertaker in Mill- 
ville, was born November S, 1841, in Port 
Elizabeth, this county, son of Fithian S. and 
Ellen B. (Smith) Simmons. The family, 
which is of German origin, was founded by 
the great-grandfather of Thomas S. Daniel 
F. Simmons, the grandfather, who was a 
wheelwright, moved when a young man from 
Burlington, Burlington County, to Port PHiza- 
beth, where he afterward died. He opened 
one of the first carriage shops in that town. 

Fithian S. Simmons, who was also a native 
of Port Elizabeth, born August 8, 1808, 
learned the trade of wheelwright with his 
father, and carried on the carriage shop for 
many years. He also worked at the trades of 
carpenter and shoemaker, and was actively 
employed until within a few years of his death. 
He served the community in the capacity of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'57 



Overseer of Roads. His wife was a daughter 
of Wesley Smith, of Port Elizabeth, who was 
also a wheelwright, and died when compara- 
tively young. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Simmons were 
the parents of seven children, si.x of whom at- 
tained maturity. Their daughter, Elizabeth, 
married Lewis Sockwell, of Millville; John 
S. resides in Millville; Ezekiel fought in the 
late war with the Twenty-fourth Regiment, 
New Jersey Volunteers, Company B, and was 
killed in the battle of Fredericksburg, Decem- 
ber 13, 1862; Fithian died in infancy; and 
Fithian S. is engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness in Camden, N.J. The father died in 
Millville in December, 1892, while visiting 
his son Thomas. The mother died twenty 
days after her husband, being then seventy- 
four years of age. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Three of their sons served their country in the 
late war — John S., Thomas S. , and P^zekiel. 

Thomas S. Simmons received his education 
in the public schools of Port Elizabeth and 
Millville, after which he served a three years' 
apprenticeship with John W. Hoover to the 
cabinet-maker's trade. At the age of seven- 
teen he started as a journeyman, working here 
and at Port Elizabeth until his enlistment in 
Company B, Twenty-fourth Regiment, New 
Jersey Volunteer Infantry. The first engage- 
ment he took part in after joining the Army 
of the Potomac was that of Chancellorsville. 
While in the service he was promoted from 
the rank of Corporal to that of Sergeant. He 
was honorably discharged at the expiration of 
his term of service. In the latter part of the 



same year, after his return to Millville, he 
joined with D. B. Snyder in the undertaking 
business. Mr. Snyder subsequently sold his 
remaining interest to Henry Poole, after 
which the firm was known as Simmons & 
Poole. Eight years after Mr. Poole retired 
from the firm ; and Mr. Simmons conducted 
the business alone for a number of years, 
building it up to the highest standard. His 
brother, J. S. Simmons, recently joined him, 
since which the firm name has been T. S. 
Simmons & Brother. Their present fine 
place of business is located at 122 North 
High Street. It is a three-story building, 
one hundred and twenty-five feet deep by thirty 
feet front. Mr. Simmons has buried over 
three thousand persons. P'or the last five 
years this enterprising man has been engaged 
in contracting and building. He erected 
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, also the 
fine high-school building at a cost of thirty 
thousand dollars, besides other city buildings. 
Mr. Simmons also manufactures brick in a 
large yard across the river, at the rate of over 
one million a year, and uses them largely in 
his building operations. He now owns a good 
deal of property on High Street. In politics 
he is a Republican, but he has no ambition 
for office. He is a member of Shekinah 
Lodge of Millville and of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 

On March 5, 1866, Mr. Simmons was united 
in marriage with Miss Lorell H. High, 
daughter of Samuel D. High, of Millville. 
They are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which Mr. Simmons was steward 



•58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for some years and has been Trustee for a long 
time. Formerly he lived on High Street above 
Vine. At present he resides at 322 High 
Street, below Vine. Mr. and Mrs. Simmons 
have no children, but they have had the care 
of a daughter of Mrs. Simmons's brother from 
its early infancy. Mr. Sinimons's success in 
business is a striking illustration of what the 
coupling of ability with energy can attain. 




'MITH DARE, a leading farmer of 
Fairfield township, was born Decem- 
ber 19, 1835, in. Stoe Creek town- 
ship, Cumberland County, son of Abel S. and 
Jane (I lusted) Westcott Dare. The Dare fam- 
ily is of English descent. David Dare, the 
grandfather of Smith, lived in Roadstown, 
this county, where lie was a well-known and 
successful tailor. He and his wife had a num- 
ber of children, only three of whom lived 
to maturity — Isaac, Abel S., and Amelia. 
Amelia, now deceased, became the wife of 
Joshua Rhinehart, of Chester County, Penn- 
sylvania, and had four children — Howard, 
lulgar, Cornelia, and Fannie. 

Abel S. Dare was a native of Roadstown, 
born on May 3, 1803. With the exception of 
a few months spent in Northern New York, 
he lived on the farm of his brother-in-law, 
Mr. Richard Garrison, until his marriage, 
when he went to Stoe Creek township, and 
rented a farm. A man of much energy, he 
afterward became the owner of a large prop- 
erty, including four valuable farms. In poli- 
tics he affiliated with the Democratic party. 



was elected Surveyor of Highways, and served 
for a time on the Town Committee. He first 
married Susan Husted, born on November ig, 
1804, who died, having had but one child, 
Ebenezer. Ebenezer, who was born Novem- 
ber 5, 1829, died in 1876, on the old home- 
stead, at the age of forty-six years. Abel S. 
Dare subsequently married Jane (Husted) 
Westcott, then a widow, who was a sister of 
his first wife and a daughter of Daniel Husted. 
The children of this marriage were: Edgar, 
David, Smith, and Maria. David was born 
October 6, 1833. Maria, who was born on 
March 17, 1838, married Norton L. PauUin, 
of Bridgeton, this county. The mother was a 
native of Fairfield township, born February 7, 
1796. She came of Swedish ancestry. Her 
father, Daniel, was an early settler in that 
township, where he followed agricultural pur- 
suits. Three of Mrs. Jane Dare's children 
were born in Stoe Creek township. Her hus- 
band afterward bought a farm near Laning's 
Wharf in Fairfield township, where he became 
an extensive farmer. They were formerly 
members of the old Baptist church in Roads- 
town, but were afterward received into the 
membership of the Cedarville church. Abel S. 
was an active worker in the church, and offi- 
cially served it as Trustee and Collector, lie 
died on January 28, 1877, at the age of seventy- 
four years. His wife died in August, 1873. 
Their son David, who was a native of Stoe 
Creek, born October 6, 1833, was a child when 
he came here with them, and subsequently re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of 
the town. On March 15, 1882, he married 



BIOGRAPHKAI, RF.VIEW 



'59 



Adeline Jaggers, daughter of Richard R. 
Jaggers, a farmer of Fairfield (the old town- 
ship). They have one child, Maria P. Dare, 
who was bom April 29, 1889. Another child 
died in infancy. Both parents are highly re- 
spected members of the Baptist church in 
Ccdar\ille, of which the father is a Deacon. 

Smith Dare was educated in the common 
schools of Fairfield. He assisted on the home 
farm until he came of age. Then his father 
confided to him the entire management of the 
estate. Mr. Dare and his two brothers are 
now joint owners of the property. Smith and 
David live on the home farm, and Edgar 
makes his home on the one at Sayres Neck. 
Before Western meat came in they were en- 
gaged in stock raising, but recently they do 
more general farming. Smith and David 
built a beautiful house, one of the best in the 
township, which they first occupied in 1887. 
They are first-class farmers, and use all the 
latest appliances. While Mr. Smith Dare is 
not an active politician, still less an office- 
seeker, he has been a good town officer. 
After the division of Fairfield, twelve or thir- 
teen years ago, by the setting oflf of Ijwrencc, 
he was elected the first F"reoholder, and filletl 
the office continuously until May, 1896. He 
has also been a member of the District Stand- 
ing Committee. 



rOHX STRATTON REEVES, assistant 
manager of Whitall, Tatum & Co.'s 
South Millville works, and a native of 
this county, was bom February' 5, 1S31, son 



of Nathaniel H. and Jane (Steelman) Reeves. 
His grandfather, Abraham Reeves, who was a 
lifelong farmer of Port Elizabeth, N.J., died 
in that place on December 24, 1838, in the 
seventy-fifth year of his age. 

Nathaniel H. Reeves was born at Port 
Elizabeth on January 27, 1795. Although 
the opportunities for schooling in those days 
were oftentimes very limited, it was his 
privilege to attend the public schools of his 
native town. After acquiring his education 
he remained with his father on the farm 
until he was of age. He then rented a 
farm, and was successfully engaged in carry- 
ing it on until by his father's death the old 
homestead came to him by inheritance. Soon 
after he took up his residence there, and car- 
ried on the farm with profit until about three 
years before his death. At that time he came 
to Millville, and thereafter lived in practical 
retirement. He served for many years as a 
Freeholder. His wife, Jane, was a daughter 
of Charles Steelman, who resided near Tucka- 
hoe, N.J. Of the union there were b<irn 
eleven chiKlren, of whom but one did not at- 
tain maturity. They were: Harriet, born 
May 3, 1R19, now deceased, who married Na- 
thaniel Foster, of Millville; Elmer antl Al- 
fred, born respectively on January S, 1S21, 
and October 11, 1822, who were drowned at 
sea on November 22, 1S46; Jane Ann, bom 
December 17, 1824, the widow of Lewis 
Gandy, of Tuckahoe; Eliza, bom June 25, 
1826, the wife of Lewis C. Stanley, of Mill- 
ville; Nathaniel Reeves, Jr., born April 16, 
1S29: John Stratton, the subject of this 



i6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sketch; Smith, born May lO, 1834, who re- 
sides in New York City; Ellis, born Novem- 
ber 10, 1837, who lives in Millville; and 
Lydia Smith, born July 11, 1839, the widow 
of Daniel Hires. 

John Stratton Reeves acquired his education 
in the common schools of Millville. After 
leaving school he learned the glass-blowing 
trade, and was successfully engaged in that 
trade for nineteen years. In 1S69 he was 
made assistant manager of Whitall, Tatum & 
Co.'s South Millville works. In this position 
now for more than a quarter of a century, he 
has proved himself one of the most faithful 
and efficient men in the company's employ- 
ment. On June 23, 1852, Mr. Reeves was 
joined in marriage with Miss Althea Camp- 
bell, a daughter of William Campbell, of 
Dividing Creek, this county. His children 
are: Lewis, Henry, and Clara. Clara is now 
the wife of Samuel Stanger, of Millville. 

In politics Mr. Reeves is a firm Republican. 
Among the responsible official positions that 
he has held are those of City Assessor in 
Ward 2 and School Trustee. In 1871 he 
was elected a member of the City Council 
from the Second Ward, and re-elected in 1874, 
serving all together six years, during which 
time he was a member at different times of all 
the committees. He is a member of Millville 
Lodge, No. 47, Indei)endent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of which he is Past Grand; and he 
served as a representative to the Grand Lodge 
in 1858. He has membership also in the Im- 
proved Order of Heptasophs, Knights of 
Honor, and Chosen Friends. Mr. Reeves and 




his wife are among the oldest and most es- 
teemed members of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal Church of Millville, and he has served 
as its Recording Secretary for twenty-five 
years. 

ON. JOSIAH B. COMER, the Mayor 
of Millville from 1877 to 1886 and 
the only one that has filled the 
office a third term, was born July 14, 1822, 
near Fairton village, in Fairfield township, 
this county, son of John and Ruth (Bennett) 
Comer. The family is of German origin. 
When quite young his father, who had resided 
for a number of years in Fairfield, moved to 
the lower end of Gloucester County, where he 
died in 1830. His mother, a native of Fair- 
ton, was a daughter of Samuel ]?ennctt, an old 
resident of the county. Of the ten children 
of John Coiner the following is recorded: 
John is a resident of Camden, N.J. ; Nathan 
resides in Millville; Joseph, in Haleyville, 
N.J. ; George went West; Rebecca is the 
widow of William Righter, of Philadelphia; 
Israel, who was for some time a resident of 
Williamstown, N.J., died there in 1895; and 
Sarah, Catherine, and Ruth are also deceased. 
The mother, who was a Presbyterian, passed 
the last days of her life with her daughter 
Rebecca. 

The Hon. Josiah B. Comer, though a man 
of culture, attended school for only si.\ or 
seven weeks. Obliged to earn his living 
from an early age, he studied evenings, after 
working hours, until he had a good education. 
In his early manhood he lived at Willow 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i6i 



Grove, Cumberland County, working at what- 
ever offered itself; and later he was a resident 
of F'orest Grove, Gloucester County, where 
he superintended a saw-mill. In 1866 he 
moved to Millville. Here he had charge of a 
saw-mill for six or seven years, and became 
prominent as a strong advocate of temperance. 
In 1877 he was elected Mayor on a temperance 
issue, and the first six years of his adminis- 
tration were devoted to a crusade against the 
liquor sellers. The term of office being three 
years, his three successive elections kept him 
in the mayoral chair nine years in all. He 
accomplished a great work, effectually stop- 
ping, for the time being, the illegal sale of 
liquor; and the resulting order and prosperity 
in the city were matter for congratulation. 
Among the many improvements made in the 
city during his official life may be mentioned 
the construction of the water works. Mr. 
Comer is now living retired at his pleasant 
home, [7 Broad Street, Millville, where he 
has resided since 1866. 

He was married in 1845 to Miss Amy 
Down, of Downsville, Gloucester County, and 
became the father of seven children. I""ive of 
tiie number are now living. Rutii is the 
wife of Isaac Finch, of X'inelar.d, this cfiunty; 
Rebecca is the wife of Wilbur X. Pan- 
coast; Lizzie is with her father; Sarah is 
the widow of John Henderson, of Cape May 
County; Letta, deceased, was the wife of 
Aldorus Aldrich; lunma died at the age 
of eighteen years; and Percy is foreman at 
the glass factory of Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
Mrs. Comer died December 16, 1885. Mr. 



Comer belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and has filled the office of Past 
Grand of his lodge; and he attended the 
Grand Lodge at different times. He is also a 
member of the Senior Order of American Me- 
chanics. He is a prominent member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has 
officiated as Trustee, steward, class leader, and 
Sunday-school sujierintendent. 




LLEN ROGERS SHINN, Sheriff of 
Cumberland County, was born at 
Haleyville, N.J., on October 14, 
1847, son of Allen R. and Abigail (Compton) 
Shinn. His grandfather, Samuel Shinn, wiio 
was a member of the Society of Friends, and 
spent his life in Burlington County, was acci- 
dentally killed by the fall of a tree. Samuel 
Shinn married Miss Hannah Taylor, who sur- 
vived him, living to the very advanced age of 
ninety-four years. 

Allen R. Shinn, Sr. , was born near Mount 
Holly, Burlington County, in the year 1801. 
He was a 3'oung boy at the time of his father's 
death. When about twenty years old he came 
to Cumberland County with Marmaduke 
Taylor, settling in Mauricetown. He after- 
ward lived for many years in Haleyville, 
where he followed farming with success. He 
also dealt in wood and hoop poles, and was a 
prominent man. The only public office in 
which he consented to serve was that of School 
Trustee, to which he was successively elected 
for several terms, until advancing years led 
him to decline further nomination. In his 



l62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



younger days he was a Whig, but after the 
formation of the Republican party he became 
one of its strong advocates. His wife, Abi- 
gail, was a daughter of Gilbert Compton. 
Her ancestors were among the early settlers 
of South Jersey, and the names of some of 
them ajipcar on the roll of those who fought 
for American independence. She bore her 
husband nine children, all of whom attained 
maturity. The family were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. The father died 
in October, 1S84, and the mother in April, 

1873- 

Allen Rogers Shinn received his education 
in the schools of Halcyville, after which 
he continued to live with his parents until he 
was twenty-two years old. At that time he 
purchased a part of the home farm, and en- 
gaged in market gardening for the New York 
and Philadelphia trade. At the same time he 
managed his father's part of the farm. He 
was profitably occupied in this way until he 
purchased the mail and stage line connecting 
Ileislerville, Lecsburg, Uorchestcr, Port I^liz- 
abeth, and Manumuskin station on the Cape 
May & Camden Railroad, a route of eleven 
miles. This he subsequently sold, and en- 
gaged in the livery business at Mauricctown, 
which in tiie following year he sold to his 
brothers-in-law, and purchased the stage line 
from Tuckahoe to Woodbine station in Cape 
May County. Afier running this for a year, 
he sold, and bought a livery business at Vine- 
land, which he conducted successfully until 
his election to the office of Sheriff of Cumber- 
land County on November 7, 1893. On that 



occasion he received one thousand, eight hun- 
dred, and seventy-si.x votes. On the 15th of 
that month he took the oath of office, and has 
since made his home in this city. Although 
his official business has been nearly double 
that of previous terms, his duties have been 
performed in a most creditable manner. He 
has shown himself to be thoroughly qualified, 
and a man who can be relied upon for faith- 
ful service. 

On New Year's Day, 1870, Mr. Shinn was 
married to Miss Sally Robinson, a daughter of 
Thomas Robinson, of Dividing Creek. They 
have five children, as follows: Abigail, who 
is the wife of Herbert Perrigo, of Vineland, 
and has two children; Arthur, who is in the 
trainmaster's office of the W'est Jersey Rail- 
road at Camden; Thomas R., a student of the 
West Jersey Institute; Wilson B. ; and 
Mamie. The family attend and support the 
Methodist ICpiscopal church. Mr. Shinn has 
supported the Republican party from the time 
he was old enough to cast a vote. He belongs 
to the lirotherhood of the Union, and is a 
member of both Vineland Lodge, No. 69, and 
luireka Chapter of the Masonic Order. 




,APTAIN DeMOTT SHAW, formerly 
a seaman for many years, but at the 
]iresent time successfully engaged 
in the coal and wood business at Millville, 
was born February 16, 1840, at Rockaway, 
near Rockaway Beach, L.I., son of DeMott 
and ICliza (Prower) Shaw. His grand- 
father on the paternal side was Henry Shavi', 



.BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



. 163 



a successful farmer of Long Island. DeMott 
Shaw, who was a native of Rockaway, lived 
there until after his marriage. He then 
removed to Seaville, Cape May County, N.J., 
where he was afterward profitably engaged in 
the oyster business. His wife, Eliza, bore 
him two sons and a daughter — Henry, De- 
Mott, Jr., and Eliza. Henry is a resident of 
Cape May County; and Eliza is the wife of 
Chester J. Todd. The mother's death oc- 
curred many years ago. Both parents were 
communicants of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Captain DeMott Shaw was educated in the 
schools of Seaview, Atlantic County. His 
first experience on the sea was obtained in his 
fatlver"s oyster-boat. He continued to assist 
his father until he was sixteen years of age, 
at which time he secured a position on board 
a coastin-g-vessel. Within six years after, he 
worked his way up to the rank of captain, and 
had command of a vessel. Thereafter it was 
his custom to make trips from Philadelphia to 
New England seaports in the summer and to 
the Gulf of Mexico and South American ports 
in the winter. He invariably owned an inter- 
est in the different vessels he sailed. One of 
these, the "Ann H. Hickman," jniilt at Mill- 
ville, struck a wreck at sea; and he was 
obliged to make for the beach iti order to keep 
from sinking. At the time of the Civil War 
he was engaged in the government service, 
transporting army supplies of all kinds, during 
which he had s:)me narrow escapes from fall- 
ing into the hands of the enemy. In 1884, 
while managing owner of the schooner "Anna 



L. Mulford," he employed a good sailing- 
master to relieve him of the command when 
he desired. Four years later he finally 
abandoned seafaring, and started his coal and 
wood business in High Street at Millville. 
A switch from the New Jersey Railroad hav- 
ing a long frontage on this street makes the 
location an especially desirable one for his 
business. At present Captain Shaw has the 
largest trade and yard in the city, and gives 
employment to four men. He is also largely 
interested in real estate and ship property. 

On January 24, 1867, Captain Shaw was 
married to Miss Emma B. Shaw, a daughter 
of Simon -Shaw, of Reeves Mill, near Mill- 
ville. They have one daughter, Mary E. 
The family attend and support the Methodist 
Episcopal church, of wliich the wife and 
daughter are members. They reside in their 
pleasant home at the corner of Second and 
Millliury Streets, which has been Captain 
Shaw's property for the past twenty-two years. 



M 



AX'II) II. McBRIDE, who during 
1(7) J '^'^ busy and useful life filled many 
prominent positions in his native 
county, of which he was at one time Sheriff, 
was born in Pxnvcntowii, Cumberland Count)-, 
N.J., November 24, 1834. 

He was a son of Lewis and Rebecca 
(Bovven) McBride; and it seems a pretty co- 
incidence that he was born in the same house 
in which his mother first saw the world's 
light, in the same room, and on the same day 
of the month. He was two years old when 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his parents moved to Bridgeton, N.J.; and 
here his childhood was passed. He attended 
the common schools of Bridgeton, and was 
also a student at the old Shiloh Academy. 
Having determined to be a farmer, he, with 
a wisdom beyond his years, took a special 
course in chemistry, as a knowledge of the 
properties of the soil would be of great ad- 
vantage to one desiring to cultivate the fruits 
of mother earth intelligently and to the great- 
est profit. He then spent two years as a farm 
hand, learning all the details of the laborious 
work practically. At the end of this period 
of experimental labor he began to take charge 
of his father's farm, and while engaged in this 
wise he was married. Mr. McBride contin- 
ued on the farm for some time, becoming 
more successful each year, and gaining quite 
a reputation in the township. During this 
period he became deeply interested in the old 
Agricultural Society, and was for many years 
its Secretary, even after leaving the farm 
being still one of its most active officials and 
supporters. I^^our years after his marriage he 
left Howentown and moved to Bridgeton, 
where he gave up his former o(cu]iation to 
engage in mercantile life. 

His first venture in tiiis line was as a dealer 
in hay, wood,' and coal, and his stand was on 
Ikoad Street near Cohansey River, he having 
bought the property there which is now 
owned by Fithian & I'ennell. -So successful 
was he in this enterprise that he soon added 
to his wares wagons, all sorts of agricultural 
iin]denients, and seeds. He was agent for 
the Buckeye mower; and as at that time mow- 



ing machines were new, he made a handsome 
profit by the sales of these popular imple- 
ments. His traffic, indeed, was growing 
apace, he having had the shrewdness to buy 
out the business as well as the property of the 
old firm which he succeeded. He continued 
in this line of trade until 1878, when he was 
elected to the office of Sheriff of Cumberland 
County. Charles E. Mulford, his brother-in- 
law, was now taken into partnership with him, 
this giving him an opportunity to discharge 
his official duties. 

During the three years' of his incumbency 
Sheriff McBride was faithful and diligent in 
his service to the public, and became a great 
favorite generally. He was a man of strong 
political influence, which was always wielded 
in behalf of the party to which he had plighted 
his allegiance, the Republican. He was a 
member of the Republican Committee, and 
was a delegate to State and other less impor- 
tant conventions. A large-minded spirit for 
general improvement characterized this gentle- 
man, and he spared no effort within his i)ower 
to advance the best interests of his town and 
county. After the expiration of his term of 
office as Sheriff, he became connectetl with 
the Eastlake Glass Company, buying out the 
interest of John Bowen, of Kirby & Bowen, 
and becoming the practical man of the com- 
pany. Under his able management the fac- 
tory was enlarged and the business increased. 
His widow still retains an interest in this en- 
terprise, her share consisting of a five-pot 
furnace. 

Mr. McBride was married on January 2, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i6s 



1856, to Caroline D. Miilford, a native of 
Bridgeton, where she was born October 11, 
1S34. Her parents were Jonathan and Cath- 
erine (Hay) Mulford. Jonathan Mulford, her 
father, was born May 6, 1800, in Greenwich 
township, this county. He lived there until 
he grew up, and then came to liridgeton, 
where he was employed in what is known as 
Elmer's mill, near East lake on East Com- 
merce Street. After a few years of efficient 
service he was placed in charge of the mill, 
and became the head miller of the largest 
mill for many a mile around. He was indus- 
trious and faithful, and a large custom trade 
was established. Mr. Mulford married Miss 
Catherine Hay, daughter of John and I^arbara 
Hay, who were residents of Baltimore, but of 
Dutch ancestry and of Pennsylvania birth. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hay came to Baltimore in 1812, 
and in 1825 their daughter came to Bridgeton 
to bring a family of orphaned children to the 
home of a relative, Mr. Robert Dare. When 
Miss Hay had made ready to return, her little 
charges raised such lamentations that she con- 
sented to remain. This prolongation of her 
stay in Bridgeton resulted in her marriage to 
Jonathan Mulford, which was solemnized 
March 15, 1827. Mr. Mulford died in his 
forty-ninth year, August 16, 1849. Mrs. 
Mulford moved to Dayton, Ohio, after her 
husband's death, remaining there for five 
years, and then returning to Bridgeton, where 
she lived until her death, which occurred 
March 26, 1879, at the age of eighty years. 
Mrs. Mulford had the happiness of rearing a 
large family, all of whom have filled honor- 



able places. They were: Francis, now of 
Dayton, Ohio; Tillie T., who has always, 
with short exceptions, lived in Bridgeton; 
Lorenzo, a resident of Cincinnati, Ohio; Car- 
oline, Mrs. McBriile; Charles K., of Bridge- 
ton; and Clarence, the youngest-born, who 
died from a wound received in the Civil War, 
or rather from the effects of this wound. 
Both of Mrs. McBride's parents were members 
of the old F'irst Church at Bridgeton. 

David H. and Caroline D. (Mulford) Mc- 
Bride became the parents of eight children, 
only one of whom is now living, David H., 
Jr., born May 27, 1S75. The others were: 
Katie, who lived to be eighteen years of age, 
and died in the promise of a sweet woman- 
hood; Harriet, who lived to be seven; Carrie, 
who died at the age of two and a half years; 
Sallie, who passed into the abode of the 
blessed in her stainless infancy, having lived 
on earth but three months; Jennie, who died 
at two and a half years, just after the birth of 
her brother, Howard, who tarried with his par- 
ents for the brief space of seven months; and 
Flora, who died at thirteen months. 

Mrs. McBride has long been a consistent 
member of the Second Presbyterian Church of 
Bridgeton, of which her husband was a Trus- 
tee and for many years President of the Board. 
He was very domestic in his tastes, and be- 
longed to but one social organization, Brearly 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M. In the death of 
David H. McBride on the 17th of October, 
1894, leaving a sad vacancy in the home 
circle, the community exi^erienced the loss of 
a valued citizen, who was taken from their 



i66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



midst in the strength of manhood, not much 
beyond its prime, and still full of spiritual 
youth and vigor. Mr. McBride has left to his 
son the inheritance of an honored name, re- 
vered alike in business, social, and religious 
circles of his fellow-citizens. 



KEWIS McBRlDE, who was for many 
years an influential and highly es- 
"^ teemed citizen of Ikidgeton, N.J., 
was born in 1797 in Burlington County, this 
State. He attended the schools of the neigh- 
borhood until his fifteenth year, when he was 
apprenticed to a wheelwj-ight and carriage 
builder, by the name of Samuel Stack, to 
learn from him the two trades. His term of 
apprenticeship lasted for six years, terminat- 
ing just as he reached his majority. In 1818 
he came to Bridgeton, where after a period of 
unremitting labor and by force of superior 
skill in his work he finally established a large 
business as a manufacturer of carriages and 
heavy wagons. So extensively was he en- 
srased in this line of manufacture that he em- 
ployed as many as eighteen men in his shops, 
which will be noted as a large number, when 
it is remembered that this was long before 
there were monopolies in trade. The McBride 
wagons soon gained a wide reputation for du- 
rability and excellence of quality, and the 
Bridgeton manufacturer achieved financial 
success. 

The year 1822 was an eventful one in 
Lewis McBride's life, as it was within its 
round of months that he was united in mar- 



riage to Miss Rebecca Bowen, of Hopeville. 
Miss Bowen was a daughter of Daniel Bowen, a 
representative of one of the oldest families in 
the county. The children born to Lewis and 
Rebecca (Bowen) McBride were: I'hcebe, who 
became the wife of Joel Fithian, and is no 
longer living; Edward, who married Mrs. 
Harriet Packard, and is now a resident of 
South Omaha; Lewis, who married Miss Ruth 
Harris; Rebecca, who married the Rev. Jo- 
seph HubbartI, and is now dead ; David, 
wiiose biography may be found elsewhere in 
this volume; Jesse, a physician in Columbia, 
Pa. ; and Louisa, who married Francis Clunn, 
now of Chicago. 

In matters of public import Lewis Mc- 
Bride took great interest, and wielded a 
marked influence. For many years he was a 
Whig, and was a Director of the Board of 
County Freeholders. Various offices of trust 
were given him by the vote of the people of 
his section. He was the first superintendent 
of public schools in Bridgeton, which position 
he filled until his death, and was also the first 
President of the County Agricultural Society, 
and held the same office in the Cumberland 
Steamboat Company. Mr. McBride was a 
member ami liberal supporter of the Second 
Presbyterian Church of his town, and was one 
of the Elders of it at the time of his death, 
which occurred October, 1864, in his sixty- 
seventh year. Mrs. McBride passed into 
spiritual life in the July of 1882. 

The McBride family is now represented by 
a younger generation, and it may be hoped 
that its present and future representatives will 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



167 



live up to the high standard of those who 
have left behind them the examples of godly 
lives. 



-ONATHAN S. WHITAKER, M.D., 
for many years one of the leading gen- 
eral practitioners of South Jersey, was 
born January 26, 1823, in Ccdarville, Cum- 
berland County, son of Thomas and Deborah 
S. Whitakcr. He was a student at Hridgeton 
Academy contemporaneously with Furman 
Sheppard, afterward District Attorney for 
Philadelphia, and graduated from Jefferson 
Medical College in 1848. Much of his early 
life was passed in Ccntrcton, N.J. His first 
general practice was in Salem County, his 
home being in Elmer till 1864, when he 
moved to Millville, this county. In that 
place he had a large practice, to which he 
gave his attention till 1S91, when on ac- 
count of failing health he retired. Dr. Whit- 
akcr was an active member of the Cumberland 
Medical Society, which he served at one time 
as its President and at another as its dele- 
gate to State and national medical societies. 
As a medical man he had a successful and 
liouorable career. 

Dr. Whitakcr for years was active in poli- 
tics as a leading member of the Democratic 
party. He was nominated for State Senator 
in 1880. This was the year of the exciting 
Garfield campaign. Though a Democrat in a 
Republican district, his opponent was elected 
by a surprisingly small majority. While a 
resident of Elmer (or Pittstown), he was nom- 
inated for the Assembly, and was defeated by 



two or three votes only; while he received 
every vote cast in Pitt's Grove township — a 
flattering tribute. In 1881 he was appointed 
Judge of the Court of Ivrrors and Appeals by 
Governor Ludlow, nnw a judge, anil was reap- 
pointed at the expiration of his term by 
Governor Abbott. This position he held for 
two terms of five years each. An acli\e 
worker for the Democratic party, he was a del- 
egate to many im[)ortaiit conventions, Chair- 
man of the County Convention for a number 
of years, and also Chairman of the Democratic 
County Committee. For a number of years 
he was a member of the Millville School 
Board. 

The Doctor married Miss Mary Johnson, f)f 
Elmer, daughter of Jolm Jolinson. Mr. John- 
son, who was an old and prominent resident of 
Elmer, was a miller by occupation, and served 
as Justice of the Peace and in other official 
capacities. Dr. Whitaker reared four chil- 
dren, namely: Lilly, the wife of William 
Hitzman, of Millville; Thomas, who was 
Mayor of Millville from 1 S89 till 1895; John 
J., also of Millville; anil Lizzie C, the wife 
of George Hogan, likewise residing in Mill- 
ville. Dr. Whitaker is Past Grand of Grotto 
Lodge of Ccntrcton, Independent Order of 
Odd P'ellows, which he founded some time 
prior to 1850; and Past Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of the State. He is also Past 
Master of Shekinah Lodge, A. F. & A. M., 
Past High Priest of Richmond Chapter, and 
Past Eminent Commander of Olivet Com- 
mandery, and by virtue of his office attended 
the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter, and Grand 



i68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Comniandery. As a Knight of Pythias he has 
been very prominent, and remained with the 
old lodo-e at the time of its division. 



/T^OLONEL GEORGE AVERY 
\J\ CHEP^VER, a paper box manufact- 
^ — -^ urer and prominent citizen of V^ine- 
land, N.J., was born in Medway, IVIass., on 
November 24, 1843, son of David Avery and 
Susan (Ruggles) Cheever. His grandfather, 
Ariel Cheever, was bcrn in Wrenthani, Mass., 
in 1770. He was a blacksmith by trade and 
also a farmer. During the War of 1812 he 
enlisted as a private in a company that was 
organized in Wrentham, and at his discharge 
had risen to the rank of Colonel. He mar- 
ried Miss Nancy Grant, a cousin to Jesse 
Grant, the father of General Ulysses S. 
Grant. 

Their son, David Avery Cheever, was born 
in Wrentham in 18 13. Plaving acquired his 
education in the public schools of that town, 
he went to Medway, Mass., and entered the 
employ of two older brothers, who were en- 
gaged in a general mercantile business. After 
working for them eight years he removed to 
West Medway, and started a general store on 
his own account, which he conducted up to 
1859. P'or four years thereafter he livetl in 
Canton, Mass., where he carried on a general 
store. In 1867 he came to Vineland and es- 
tablished a paper box manufactory, and did a 
profitable business in this line until his death 
on March 17, 1882. Under President l-'ill- 
more's administration he was appointed Post- 



master of Medway, and he held the ofifice for 
eight years. He was Deputy Sheriff of Nor- 
folk County, Massachusetts, for four years. 
Assessor of Medwa'y for three years, and Se- 
lectman of that town for many years. The 
fire department of Medway was organized 
under his leadership, and for many years he 
was its Chief Engineer. Pie was a member of 
the Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, Susan, 
was a daughter of Abram and Esther (Cum- 
mings) Ruggles. Their marriage took jilace 
in 1 841. A son and daughter were born to 
them; namely. Pollen M. and George Avery. 
The parents attended and supported the Pres- 
byterian church, of which the mother was a 
member. 

George Avery Cheever was an attendant of 
the public schools of Medway until he was 
twelve years old, then on account of the fre- 
quent change of teachers in the schools his 
father took him into his store and personally 
taught him. He remained in his father's 
store until the beginning of the Civil \Var. 
Three weeks before open hostilities were 
begun he became a member of Company A of 
the Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Militia. As soon as the news of the 
attack on P'ort Sumter reached Boston, the 
regiment was ordered to assemble on Boston 
Common, where it was reviewed by Governor 
Andrew, who in his address to them said 
that he had not the authority to order the regi- 
ment outside the State, and called for volun- 
teers for three months to step forward two 
paces. The regiment iiromjjtly resixinded to a 
man. -They were sent to P'ortress Monroe, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



171 



where they mounted guns, from there to 
Hampton, and thence to Newport News, 
which they fortified, remaining at the last- 
named place about six weeks. His time hav- 
ing then expired, Mr. Cheever retiuMied home 
in August, 1861 . 

In November of that year he re-enlisted 
for three years in Company K of the First 
Battalion of Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, 
which was sent down Boston Harbor to Fort 
Warren, and remained there until March i, 
1S62. A regiment having been formed by the 
addition of four battalions, known as the 
Thirty-second Regiment of Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, they were then sent to Fair- 
fax Court-house, and thence to Alexandria, 
Va., where they took a steamer up the James 
River to Harrison's Landing. Arriving there 
during the progress of the battle of Malvern 
Hill, they were drawn up as a reserve, and, 
although not actively engaged in the battle, 
were exposed to the enemy's fire. Following 
that, he took part in the battles of Fredericks- 
burg, Chancellorsville, Second Bull Run, An- 
tietam, and Gettysburg. At the last-named 
battle he received a severe injury to his knee 
by the explosion of a shell from the enemy, 
and was laid up in the hospital for four or 
five months. On his recovery he rejoined his 
company, and shortly after was detailed with 
one other man from his regiment for a two 
weeks' course of study at the Branch of West 
I'oint Academy located at Philadelphia. 
Passing the examinations successfully, he was 
then assigned the work of drilling the Thirty- 
first and Thirty-second Regiments of United 



States Colored Troops. When that work was 
completed he rejoined his company, and was 
in the battle of Petersburg and all the subse- 
quent battles in whicii his regiment was en- 
gaged. He was honorably discharged fnmi 
service in April, 1865. At Chancellorsville, 
while engaged in throwing up breastworks, a 
shell from the enemy landed in front of Mr. 
Cheever, who instantly wet his finger and ex- 
tinguished the fuse, after which he threw the 
shell outside. Feeling a hand upon his 
shoulder, he turned around, and beheld Gen- 
eral Joe Hooker, who had witnessed the act, 
and inquired his name and regiment. Upon 
his return to camp Mr. Cheever found a thirty 
days" furlough and an order for three months' 
pay awaiting him. 

After the war he went to Cincinnati, where 
he was employed as conductor of a special car 
of the Seventh and Ninth Street Horse Rail- 
road, of which company an uncle was a di- 
rector. About a year later he returned to 
Vineland, and went to work in his father's 
paper box factory. In 1870 a copartner- 
ship was formed under the name of D. A. 
Cheever & Son, which continued until a year 
before the father's death, when the son pur- 
chased the business. Since that time he has 
carried it on alone. The factory is the only 
one of the kind in this city, and the business 
is large and successful. 

On May 2, 1866, Mr. Cheever was united 
in marriage with Miss Angel ine Cram, a 
daughter of John Cram, of Canton, Mass. Of 
their three children but one is now living, 
their daughter Mabel. 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Cheever has never been desirous of po- 
litical honors; but at one time, after much 
urging, he consented to allow his name to be 
used on the Republican ticket as a candidate 
for the legislature, stipulating that he would 
not spend a cent of money personally in the 
campaign. He was defeated by only twenty 
votes. For eighteen years he has been a 
member of the Board of Health, serving as its 
President during ten years of that time. He 
has been on the Board of Fire Connnissioners 
eight years and its President for five years. 
In 1873 Company D of the Fourth Battalion 
of New Jersey Volunteer Militia was organ- 
ized, with Mr. Cheever as First Lieutenant; 
and on December 7, 1875, he was appointed 
Captain. The company was afterward trans- 
ferred to the Sixth Regiment of New Jersey 
Volunteer Militia, and was then known as 
Company K. On April 14, 18S7, Mr. 
Cheever was appointed Lieutenant Colonel 
of the Sixth Regiment of National Guards, 
and on June 6, 1892, was retired as Colonel. 

l-'raternally, he is a nieinber of X'ineland 
Lodge, No. 69, A. F. & A. M. ; Hobah 
Lodge, No. 122, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, with which he has been connected 
for thirty years; and he was a member 
of l''riendship Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of 
Vineland, which is now disbanded, and of 
whici) he was Past Chancellor; also a member 
of Relief Council, No. 534, Royal Arcanum, 
of which he was Collector and Treasurer a 
number of years; and Lyon Post, No. 10, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of which he was 
the Commander at the time of the Washington 



encampment. Mr. Cheever is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, and his wife of the L^nita- 
rian church. 




AMUEL IREDELL, an attorney-at- 
^/ 1 law of Hridgeton, where he is win- 
ning repute and a goodly clientage, 
although it is not yet two years since he 
opened his office at 103 East Commerce 
Street, was born April 20, 1869, at Centre- 
ton, Salem County, son of Clark and Lizzie 
Thomas (Eft) Iredell. His great-grandfather, 
Thomas Iredell, Sr., who was a pioneer farmer 
of Mullica Hill, Gloucester County, and also 
worked at the trade of millwright, married 
Miss Sybilla Moore. Both were Quakers. 

Robert Iredell, the fourth cliild of Thomas 
Iredell, Sr., and the grandfather of Samuel, 
was born on his father's farm at Mullica Hill, 
October 21, 18 10. On attaining manhood he 
took up farming as an occupation. After his 
marriage he removed to Hardingville, N.J., 
and remained tliere until 1893, at which time 
he aliaiulonecl farming, and retired to Elmer, 
N.J. At tlic time of his ilcath, which oc- 
curred Octoijcr 7, 1895, he was eighty-five 
years old. A man of quiet, unassuming 
manner, he was yet well known for his clear 
judgment and good business ability. In the 
days of stage-coach travel he lived for a time 
at the old half-way house between Bridgeton 
and Philadelphia, where he formed many ac- 
quaintances. He married Miss Ruth Ann 
Johnson, a daughter of John Johnson, and be- 
came the father of four children, of whom two 
died in childhood. The survivors are: Clark, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



»73 



the father of Samuel; and Hannah, the wife 
of John C. Edmunds, of Elmer. The mother, 
who was born in 1830, is still living. Both 
parents were formerly connected with the 
Friends' Society, but the mother afterward 
became a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at I'^dmer. 

Clark Iredell, who was born at IMullica 
Hill, October 20, 1843, received a good prac- 
tical education in the common schools. He 
lived at home until he was eighteen years of 
age, assisting his father in the work of the 
farm. Following that he engaged in school 
teaching for three years in different towns of 
Salem and Cumberland Counties. Subse- 
quently he settled in Centreton, Salem 
County, where he engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness. When twenty-two years of age he 
opened a general store on his own account, 
and conducted it for three years. In 1869 he 
came to Bridgeton and started a grocery store, 
which he sold some time after to engage in 
the local express business. Three years later 
he sold out his express business, and accepted 
a position as salesman in the shoe store of 
W. VV. Robbins, with whom he remained two 
and a half years. He was next employed for 
six years by P. H. Goldsmith in his shoe de- 
partment; and on leaving there, in 1885, ho 
took his present position with T. N. Harris 
& Co. In 1864 Mr. Iredell was married to 
Miss Lizzie Eft, of Talentine, now Green 
Village, N.J., where her birth occurred on 
March 8, 1 S44. Her father was Frederick 
Eft, whose father came to this country from 
Germany. Ella, the first child born to Mr. 



and Mrs. Iredell, lived to be but two years 
old. Two other children are living, namely: 
Samuel, the subject of this brief biography; 
and Carrie, who is still at home. The family 
are members of the First Presbyterian Church. 

Samuel Iredell was about twelve months old 
when his parents came to Bridgeton. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools 
of this city, after which he attended the South 
Jersey Institute, where he graduated in the 
class of 1888. In the fall of that year he en- 
tered Buckncll L^niversity at Bucknell, Pa., 
where he studied for two years. In August, 
1890, he began a course of law in the office of 
Walter H. Bacon, Esq., of this city, remain- 
ing with that gentleman until 1895. In that 
year, during the February term of the .Su- 
preme Court at Trenton, N.J., he was ad- 
mitted to the bar, and has since been in active 
practice here. 

Since leaving college, Mr. Iredell has taken 
an active part in political affairs. He served 
as Secretary of the Democratic E.xecutive Com- 
mittee of Cumberland County for two years, 
and has been a delegate to both county and 
State conventions. He is a member of the 
liritlgeton Camera Society; of Hope Council, 
No. 3, Junior Order of American Mechanics; 
of Cumberland Council, No. 477, Royal Ar- 
canum; and of l'>\'ening Star Lodge of 
Masons. 



jETER CAMBLOS COSIER, senior 
member of tiie firm of I'eter C. 
Cosier & Son, wholesale oyster 
planters and shippers at Bivalve, Cumberland 




174 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



County, N.J., was born in Newport, this 
county, September i, 1846. 

Mr. Cosier is a son of Valentine and Erne- 
line (Camblos) Cosier, and is a member of an 
old and well-known family of New Jersey. 
His great-grandfather, Benjamin Cosier, 
served in the war of the Revolution, and was 
one of the soldiers who crossed the Delaware 
River on the ice with Washington, and partic- 
ipated in the battle of Trenton. He was a 
blacksmith by trade and a man of exceptional 
physical strength. One day, when he was 
ninety years of age, he walked from Newport 
to Egg Harbor, a distance of thirty miles; and 
he returned on the succeeding day. He lived 
to attain the marvellous age of one hundred 
and seven years and seven months. He was 
pensioned by the national government as a 
reward for the faithful service rendered during 
the struggle for independence. He married 
Miss Annie Shaw, a daughter of Jonathan 
Shaw, of Newport, N.J.; and they had a fam- 
ily of eleven children. 

One of their sons was Jonathan, who was 
born in Egg Harbor, Cumberland County. 
He also followed the vocation of a blacksmith, 
and, like his father, was a soldier in his coun- 
try's cause, being stationed at Red Bank, 
N.J., in the War of 1812. Owing to a severe 
injury in his hand, for many years before his 
death he was unable to work in any business. 
He wedded Miss Hilary Cantrell, and their 
union was blessed in the birth of eight chil- 
dren, namely: Benjamin; John, who, when 
seven years old, met the sad end of being 
burned to death ; Jonathan, who is also de- 



ceased ; Valentine; Phcenix; William, Mary 
Jane; and George. Valentine Cosier was 
born in Newport, November 5, 1821. He 
was educated in the common schools, and at 
an early age began to take jjart in the oyster- 
fishing industry. When he was twenty-two 
years old he was appointed captain of an 
oyster-boat, and he continued in the oyster 
business until 1870, when he disposed of his 
boat, and thenceforth devoted his attention to 
husbandry on a farm of which he had been the 
owner for a number of years. He raised gen- 
eral crops and garden vegetables, including 
sweet corn and strawberries. While engaged 
in agriculture he also conducted a stage route 
for eighteen years, or until 18S9, between 
Newport and Bridgeton; but in i88g ho sus- 
tained a fracture of his leg, and in 1895 he re- 
tired from active life. In October, 1843, Mr. 
Cosier was joined in matrimony with Miss 
Emeline Camblos, of Newport, N.J. Into 
their home came four children, namely: Peter 
Camblos; Franklin; Cynthia C, who is now 
the wife of William Sithen; and Lucius 
O. C. E. Socially, Mr. Valentine Cosier is 
affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, being 
a member of Morning Light Lodge, No. 8, 
of Newport, of which he is Past Chancellor. 
In religious faith and fellowship he has been 
associated with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Newport since 1839, ^^^^^ ''^ 't be 
has officiated for many years as a Trustee and 
as a steward. 

Peter Camblos Cosier attended the common 
schools of his native town during three 
months in winter seasons until he was fifteen. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



175 



He, however, ascribes his education largely to 
his own private reading and to his early and 
long-continued connection with practical life. 
When he was but ten years of age he began to 
follow the water with an uncle, Captain Will- 
iam Cosier by name, with whom he sailed one 
season. After that he voyaged with his father 
a year, then with Captain William L. Lore 
for the same period, again with his father for 
three seasons, and then with Gilbert Lore for 
a year, when he, at eighteen years of age, as- 
sumed charge of a boat. He commanded a 
vessel until 1883, when he engaged in the 
wholesale shipping business. 

In 1S92 Mr. Cosier's son, Morton R., was 
constituted a partner in the business, which 
had already assumed very large proportions. 
They own several oyster-vessels, which are 
occupied in fishing; and they are reputed to 
do the largest business in their line of any 
firm in the county. They have shipped daily 
from three to five carloads of oysters; and 
their merchandise is sent as far west as 
Kansas City, as far south as Baltimore, and 
to New York City and Philadelphia. Mr. 
Cosier is also a member of the firm of Stat- 
ham, Cosier & Co., who are extensively en- 
gaged at Newport in canning tomatoes and 
pumpkins. Their establishment is one of the 
largest canning houses in the soutliern ]iart of 
New Jersey. Each season they employ be- 
tween one hundred and fifty anil one hundred 
and sixty workmen, and they preserve from 
seven hundred thousand to eight hundred 
thousand cans of tomatoes each year. He is 
also one of the firm of Statham, Cosier & 



Camm, of Fairton, Cumberland County, who 
conduct about as extensive an establishment 
as the above, and produce nearly the same 
quantity of goods, which are marketed all over 
the country. 

Mr. Cosier is the President of the Riparian 
Association, which is composed of the follow- 
ing gentlemen: Joseph M. Cobb, James G. 
Gandy, Leman Garrison, Luther Bateman, 
Daniel Sharp, Harry W. Scull, John Ware, 
Howard Husted, George D. Newcomb, 
Zacheus Joslin, Sheppard Campbell, Ben- 
jamin F. Joslin, Peter C. Cosier, Morton R. 
Cosier, Lucius E. Cosier, Charles Bradford, 
George Peterson, Charles Davis, Ethan Lore, 
Oliver S. Gandy, and Quincy Husted. This 
association, which at present .is organized 
with Mr. Cosier as President, Luther Bate- 
man Treasurer, and Sheppard (Campbell 
Secretary, purchased on August 29, 1892, the 
ground on Delaware Bay from Fortescue to 
Hawks Nest, which they named a riparian 
ranch, and on which they planted oysters 
valued at between sevent)' thousand and one 
hundred thousand dollars. This ground the 
association purchased or leased from the 
State of New Jersey, and therefore sujiposed 
it possessed the exclusive right to [slant and 
to dredge oysters there. Oyster pirates, who 
engaged in oystering on these grounds, were 
arrested to the number of fifty-two. A com- 
mittee from the Delaware Bay and the 
Maurice River Oyster Association had bills 
found before the grand jury indicting these 
men for illegal dredging; but, as the warrants 
did not state where the illegal dredging oc- 



■ 7f. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



curred, the indictment was quashed. The at- 
torneys of the defendants carried the case to 
a higher court to test the constitutionality of 
what is known as the " Delaware Bay and 
Maurice Ixiver Law," where the charge was 
again declared void, the law being pronounced 
unconstitutional. The matter, however, has 
long lain in the courts; and a suit has been 
entered in the May (1896) term of the Cum- 
berland County Court by the before-named 
committee versus Zebedee Paul Hainus, of 
Leesburg. Mr. Cosier is the most active 
member of the association in pushing the 
case, of which he has been put in charge. 
The (joint at issue is whether a member of the 
association or any other person has the right 
to dredge oysters on the grounds which tiie 
Riparian Association has purchased or leased 
from the State. 

In March, 1S70, Mr. Cosier wedded Miss 
Nancy L., a daughter of Sheppard Robbins, 
of Newport, an account of wliose ancestry may 
be found in sketch of Henry S. Robbins, who 
is her cousin. Two children have blessed 
their union; namely, Morton R., and Peter 
C, Jr. 

Mr. Cosier is well and favorably known in 
both the civic and social circles of the com- 
munity; and he has served his fellows in 
l^ositions of public trust. In itStS4 his uncle, 
Peter Camblos, who officiated as Township 
Collector for fifteen or twenty years, died ; and 
he was appointed to fill the vacancy thus 
made. In the following year he was re- 
elected, but he declined to accept the proffered 
honor. For four years he has been a chosen 



Freeholder, but he has now resigned from that 
office. Socially, he is affiliated with the 
order of Knights of Pythias, being a member 
of Morning Light Lodge, No. 8, at Newport. 
He is likewise identified with the Indepen- 
dent Order of United American Mechanics of 
Newport. Both Mr. and Mrs. Cosier are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
of Newport, which he serves in the honored 
and responsible capacity of Trustee. 



^sl^OHN R. RADCLIFFE, a member of 
the City Council of Millville and the 
foreman of the black department of the 
Manantico Bleach and Dye Works, was born 
in this city, October 15, 1865, son of Richard 
B. and lillen (Scholes) Radcliffe. Richard 
B. Radcliffe, a native of England, was born 
in the town of Radcliffe, April 16, 1836. 
His education was acquired in the common 
schools. After completing his studies he 
learned the trade of bleaching, dyeing, and 
finishing, which he afterward followed as a 
journeyman for some time in PZngland. Upon 
his arrival in the LTnited States he was for 
three years employed as foreman of a bleach- 
ing and dyeing establishment in Providence, 
R.I. From there he came to Millville, where 
he became superintendent of the bleacli and 
dye department of the Millville Manufactur- 
ing Company's works. He still holds that 
position, and he is regarded as one of the most 
skilful and competent workmen in that partic- 
ular branch of the business. He is a member 
of Shckinah Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



'77 



the chapter and commandery. He is also con- 
nected with the Humane Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. His wife, Ellen, who 
was a daughter of James Scholcs, of Prest- 
wick, England, became the mother of three 
children, of whom two arc living; namely, 
James Scholes and John R. Mr. Radcliffe's 
mother died aged thirty years. She was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
with whicii Richanl 15. Radclifte is also 
united. 

James Scholes Radcliffe, the eldest son, 
was born in Radcliffe, England, February 14, 
1 86 1. He came witli his parents to the 
L'nitcd States; and, after finishing his studies 
in the public schools of Millville, he learned 
the trade of a finisher in the dye works, where 
he has been in charge of that department since 
1.S85. He attends Christ's Episcopal Church. 

John R. Radcliffe, after attending the pub- 
lic schools of Millville, supplemented his 
studies by a business course at Bryant & 
Stratton's Commercial College in Philailel- 
phia and a special course in chemistry at the 
School of Industrial Arts. Being thus well 
prepared for his chosen occujiation, he entered 
the employment of the Manantico Bleach and 
Dye Compau)-, with whom he learned the 
practical part of the trade; and, becoming 
familiar with the business, he was in 1886 
appointed foreman of the black department, a 
position which he has since filled with ability 
and satisfaction. In politics he is a Republi- 
can, being an active supporter of that party; 
and in i S94 he was elected to the City Coun- 
cil from Ward 3. As a member of the Com- 



mittees upon Railroad, Finance, Printing, 
Sanitary Affairs, Public Buildings, and Re- 
lief, he displays an energy anil sound judg- 
ment in managing the affairs of the municiiial- 
ity which have given him an influence among 
the members of the board; and his valuable 
services have received the hearty commenda- 
tion of the citizens in general. 

On November ir, 1889, Mr. Radcliffe 
wedded Clara Hughes, daughter of Mason 
Hughes, of Philadelphia; and she died Decem- 
ber 17, 1894. Mr. Radcliffe is very popular, 
and is a member of Manumuskin Tribe of Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, in which he is Past 
Sachem, ant! is also a member of Humane 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



7TA0NSTANT ALBERTSON, a highly 
I Jj successful contractor and builder of 

^•^ — -^ Bridgeton, was born at "Tiie 
Roads" in Weymouth township, Atlantic 
County, N.J., on October 6, 183 i, son of Jo- 
seiih and MiUincent (Albertson) Albcrtson. 
His mother also was a native of Atlantic 
County, born near May's Landing. 

Constant Albertson was the only chikl of 
his parents. He had but meagre opportu- 
nities for obtaining an eckication, leaving 
school when eight years old, and being unable 
to again avail himself of school privileges 
until after he was twenty-one, at which time 
he endeavored to make up his educational de- 
ficiencies, using money that he had saved for 
that purpose. Beginning at eight years of age 
to earn his own livelihood, he was appren- 



.78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ticed six years later to learn the mason's trade 
with Jeremiah Adams, working every summer 
at that occupation and during the winters in 
the window glass factory until he reached his 
majority, by which time he had become a 
practical workman in both these lines of in- 
dustry. He then removed from Columbia to 
Millville, and thence that same summer to 
Newport. A year later he was engaged as 
junior Methodist preacher on the Medford cir- 
cuit, of which John W. Hickman had charge. 
After spending a year on the circuit, his 
throat became so seriously affected that he 
was obliged to give up that work; and in 1855 
he came to Bridgeton, where he resumed his 
former trade. After working two years as a 
journeyman, he started in business for himself 
as a contractor and builder, and was very 
successful, being for many years, or as long 
as he remained thus engaged, the largest 
jjuilder here. He has erected a larger num- 
ber of brick and wood buildings than any one 
man in this city, and owns at the present time 
forty tenement houses, besides store and office ! 
jjiiildings. In view of the humble circum- 
stances of his early life, few have had a more 
prosperous career. On February 24, 185S, 
Mr. Albertson was united in marriage with 
Mrs. Elizabeth T. Madison, a daughter of John 
Godfrey, ICsq. Their home has been blessed 
by the birth of a son and daughter — Lizzie, 
tile wife of Ned Ryder, of .Syracuse, N.Y. ; 
and ICdwin C, a dealer in musical instru- 
ments in ]5ridget'on. 

Mr. Alijertson has supported the Republi- 
can party since its formation. He was one of 



the first in Downs township to vote that 
ticket, there being but three other supporters 
of Republicanism in his precinct at the time. 
He and Mrs. Albertson are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a 
Deacon. 



'^OHN ANDREW DONELLEY, a well- 
known resident of Dividing Creek and 
a blacksmith of Bivalve, this county, 
was born April 11, 1S55, in Heislerville, 
Maurice River township, this county, son of 
James and Hannah (Armstrong) Donelley. 
Mr. Donelley's grandfather, William Henry- 
Donelley, a native of Ireland, was an indus- 
trious tiller of the soil during the active 
period of his life. 

James Donelley was born in Heisler\'ille, 
June 18, 1825. After completing his studies 
in the common schools he was engaged in the 
oyster fisheries until failing health prevented 
him from pursuing that or any other calling. 
The last eight years of his life were spent in 
retirement; and he died in the prime of life, 
April 15, 1863. His wife, who was a daugh- 
ter of John Armstrong, became the mother of 
five children — John A., William Henry, 
Maurice, Mary, and Luella. Mary is the 
wife of George Gaskill; and Luella is the 
wife of Willis Taylor, of Camilen, N.J. Mrs. 
James Donelley married for her second hus- 
band Henry Clay Hughes, of Cape May, N.J., 
and by this union she had four children; 
namely, Benjamin V., Hattie M., Mary L., 
and ICmma. She died August 19, 1895, aged 
si.xty-two years and two months. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



i8i 



John Andrew Done! ley was but eiglit years 
of age when his father died. He was bound 
out to William Endicott, with whom he re- 
mained for some four years, working upon a 
farm during the summer season, and attending 
school in the winter. He then went to live 
with Mrs. l{lizabeth Mayhew at f^uckshutem, 
where he was engaged in farm labor for three 
years. After that he learned the blacksmith's 
trade with Mrs. Mayhew's son Thomas, serv- 
ing an apprenticeship of three years. Having 
finished his time he was afterward employed 
as a journeyman for two years at Cape May, 
five years at Port Norris, two years in Cedar- 
villc; and in 1879 '^^ established himself in 
business at Bivalve, where he has since re- 
mained. He has built up a large and profit- 
able business in ship work, needing the iielp 
of six men, more or less, the \ear round. 
The manufacture and repair of oyster dredges 
are made a specialty. He has had much ex- 
perience in this line of work, in which he has 
acquired a wide reputation as a skilful and 
reliable workman. 

On March g, i(SSg, Mr. Donelley wedded 
liva Gaskill, tlaughter of Isaac Gaskill, of tliis 
town. Isaac Gaskill, Mrs. Donelley's father, 
was born in Dividing Creek in April, 1827, 
son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Walker) Gas- 
kill. The family, which is of English origin, 
was founded in this country by Hazel Gaskill, 
Mr. Gaskill's great-grandfather, who emi- 
grated to America and settled in Salem, N.J. 
llazeTs son Stephen, Mr. Gaskill's grand- 
father, was born in Salem County, and became 
a prosperous farmer. He married, and reared 



a family of six children; namely, Abel, 
Hester, Charles, I^enjamin, Zerubbabcl, and 
Stephen (second). Zerubbabcl became an 
ordained minister. 

Stephen Gaskill (second), Mr. Gaskill's 
father, who was born in Newport, this county, 
attended the common schools. He resided at 
home until reaching his majority, after which 
he was engaged in farming upon a piece of 
property owned by his mother, who subse- 
quently left it to him at her death. He 
raised potatoes, wheat, and corn, besides a 
considerable number of sheep and cattle, and 
also cut large quantities of wood, which he 
shipped to Philadelphia. He died in this 
town, October 8, 1873. His wife, who was 
before marriage Elizabeth Walker, daughter 
of Daniel Walker, of Divitling Creek, became 
the mother of nine children; namely, Han- 
nah, David, I{liza, Daniel, Isaac, Stephen, 
Varney, Hester, and William. Hannah is 
the widow of Emanuel Hignut; Eliza is the 
wife of Major McDaniel ; and Hester is the 
wife of Joseph Bailey. The jiarcnts were 
memliers of the Baptist church. Isaac Gaskill 
was educated in the common schools, and at 
the age of fourteen he began life for himself 
as a cook on board an oyster-boat. When six- 
teen years old he bought the dredger named 
"The Mary," of which he had become master; 
and he was engaged in the oyster fisheries for 
about thirty-five years. On December 23, 
1857, Mr. Gaskill married Mary C. , daughter 
of Thomas Fleetwood, and of the nine chil- 
dren born of this union five grew to maturity, 
namely: Lizzie \'., who became the first wife 



l82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Herbert M. Shephard and the second wife 
of Benjamin F". Gaskill; Cecelia, tlie wife of 
Walter Hickman; Robert W. D., of whom 
there is no special record; Carrie B., the wife 
of VViibert F. B. Bower; and Ev'a, who is now 
Mrs. John A. Donelley. Mr. Gaskill is con- 
nected with tlie Good Intent Beneficial So- 
ciety, and both he and his wife are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. 
Donelley is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which Mr. Donelley is an 
attendant and supporter. 




APTAIN MARK HULINGS, an 
esteemed resident of l^ridgeton, now 
employed in the Cumberland Glass 
Works, was formerly a ship-master for many 
years. lie was born December 31, 1820, in 
Silem, N.J., son of Abram and Sarah (Locke) 
llulings. His grandfather, David Hulings, 
ill his early years was a pilot on the Delaware, 
and also followed the sea. In later life he 
settled in Bristol, Pa., where he resided until 
he came to live witii liis son Abram in 
Bridgeton. He died here when he was over 
eighty years of age. 

Abram Hulings was a native of New Jersey, 
born, it is thought, in Cape May County. 
When a young man he worked at ship -carpen- 
tering in Salem, N.J., and remained there 
until 1S23. Then he came to Bridgeton, 
where he was employed at iiis trade during 
the remainder of his life. He died on De- 
cember 18, 1868, nearly si.xtynine years of 
age. For many years he had a large shipyard 



at the foot of Vine Street, where, besides re- 
pairing and building boats for other persons, 
he built several boats to sell. His wife, 
Sarah, was a daughter of Mr. Locke, of Cam- 
den, N.J. She bore him eight children, of 
whom seven are living — Mark, the subject of 
this article; Jane, the wife of Caleb Weeks, 
of Bridgeton; Sarah, the widow of Henry 
DuBois, residing in Bridgeton; Fann}', the 
second wife of George Kenned}', whose first 
wife was her sister Elizabeth, now deceased; 
Amanda, the wife of J. Danforth Fithian; 
Harriet, who married Captain Joseph Bat- 
man; Susan, the wife of Aaron Xiclitds, of 
Bridgeton. Their father and mother were 
members of Trinity Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Captain Mark Hulings received his 
education in the common schools of Bridge- 
ton. He afterward learned the glass-blowing 
trade, which he followed for ten years. Be- 
fore taking up this trade as a regular occupa- 
tion, he secured a position on a coaster sailing 
from Philadelphia to New England and North 
Carolina ports ; and when eighteen years old 
he became master of a vessel. For many 
years after reaching his twentieth year he 
spent his summers on the sea and his winters 
at his trade of glass-blower. During the late 
war he carried produce for the government on 
his father's and his own vessels. In Jui\, 
1890, owing to an injury received, he decided 
to retire from the sea. During his seafaring 
life he had some thrilling experiences. The 
owner and commander of the sloop "Spray," 
he was on the voyage home from Bristol, Pa., 
when he was run into by the steamer "Allen- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



■S3 



town," owned by the Reading Railroad Com- 
pany; and three minutes after the collision his 
boat sunk. Of those on board, Jacob Souders 
was killed, and Jesiah Woodruff was so in- 
jured that he was drowned before assistance 
could reach him. Captain Hulings was thrown 
into the water, but was picked up b\' the 
steamer. That night, which was just before 
the election of 1880, he received settlement 
from the owners of the steamer. He had 
other narrow escapes, coming out each time 
with equal good fortune. In July, 1890, on 
account of an injury he received, he forsook 
seafaring finally. For the past five years he 
has worked for the Cumberland Glass Company. 
He has twice married. On the first occa- 
sion he was wedded to Miss Margaret Tash, a 
daughter of William Tash. She died leaving 
one son, now Captain William Hulings, of 
lirooklyn, N. Y. His second marriage was 
contracted January 7, 1861, with Miss Amelia 
A. Goodman, who was born in Philadelphia, 
March 11, 1836, daughter of James and Mary 
N. (Reese) Goodman. Her father was born 
on Kent Island, Md., and was a son of ]\Iarma- 
duke Goodman, one of the early settlers of 
that place. Early in life he carried on a 
large boat-building business. He died on 
January iS, 1854, in the prime of life, being 
but forty -two years of age. His wife, a na- 
tive of Philadelphia, who lived to the age of 
fifty -two years, died in 1873. Mrs. Hulings 
received her education in Philadelphia, and 
lived there until her marriage. She gave 
birth to eight children, of whom si.x are liv- 
ing. They were: Frank B., who died when 



three months old; Alice, who died at the age 
of five years; Mary A., who is the wife of R. 
Elmer, a shoemaker of this city; Margaretla 
G., the wife of Wallace Rice, of this city; 
Anna R., who married Charles Babcock, of 
Lansdale, Pa. ; Ida T., the wife of William 
C. Lilly, of this cit_\-; \'clma J. and Grace 
E., who are with their parents. Captain 
Hulings is a member of Millville Lodge, No. 
47, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
and Mrs. Hulings have been members of 
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church respec- 
tively for fifty-two and thirty -five years. The 
family reside in their pleasant and substantial 
home, 100 \'ine Street, erected by the Ca|itain 
in 1862. 




ARCIUS WILLSON, now resting 
in the quiet of his home in Vine- 
land after a busy life, has been an 
author of national celebrity. He was born in 
West Stockbridge, Mass., December <S, 1813, 
son of Gilbert Willson and Selecta Hen- 
dricks. The family is of good New England 
stock, coming original!)- from Rehoboth, 
Mass., which was the birthplace of Nathaniel 
Willson, the paternal grandfather of Marcius. 
Gilbert Willson, whose birth occurred in 
Richmond, Berkshire County, Mass., received 
his education in the district schools. When 
he was a young man he followed an occupation 
that may be described as travelling meichant. 
He and others engaged in the same calling, 
joined company, forming a sort of caravan 
after the Oriental fashion, and travelled to 
the Southern States in heavy covered wagons, 



i84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



carrying rich dry goods, which they offered 
for sale in the various places they jiassed 
through. Having sold their goods, it was the 
their custom to dispose of their teams and 
wagons, and return home by water. It is re- 
lated of Gilbert Willson that, when on such 
trips, he used to stop frequently at the home 
of General Macintosh in Georgia, a half-breed 
Indian, who was the chief of the Creek tribe; 
and that, on one of these occasions, the chief 
offered to bestow on his guest all the land he 
desired, provided he would take one of the 
chief's daughters in marriage. After he had 
been in the business above described for some 
years, some of the States demanded a license 
fee of six hundred dollars per county from 
each person engaged in the trade. This ren- 
dered it impossible to continue the business 
with profit; and he, as well as the others, gave 
it up. In the spring of 1821 he and his family 
removed to Richmond, Ontario County, N. Y., 
making the entire journey in a covered 
wagon. There he bought a farm, and en- 
gaged in its cultivation. Nearing the end of 
his life, he sold it to a grandson, but contin- 
ued to live on it alterward, and died there at 
the age of ninety-five years. Intelligent, in- 
dustrious, and enterprising, he had the con- 
fidence of the community, and filled for some 
time the offices of Assessor and Supervisor of 
Richmond. His first wife, .Selecta, bore him 
three cliildren, namely: ilaniet L., who be- 
came the wife of DesiiKJiid Feck, of West 
Bloonifield, N.Y. ; l^liza Ann, the w\ic of a 
Mr. Warren; and Marcius, the distinguislied 
subject of this sketch. 



Marcius Willson first attended school in 
West Stockbridge, Mass. After the family 
removed to New York State, he was, in turn, 
a student of the Canandaigua Academy and of 
the Geneseo High School. His education 
was continued in Union College, Schenectady, 
N.Y., where he gratluated in the class of 
1836. On leaving college he immediately 
obtained an engagement as teacher of classics 
and mathematics in Matteawan, N.Y., under 
Principal Charles Bartlett. He had been 
teaching here but si.\ months when Mr. Bart- 
lett accepted the principalship of the Collegi- 
ate Institute in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. ; and Mr. 
Willson went with him to take charge of the 
department of belles-lettres in the same in- 
stitution. At this place he spent four years, 
in the course of which he read law during his 
leisure hours, having his name registered in 
the office of the Hon. Nathaniel P. Talmadge, 
United States Senator. It was also in this 
period that he wrote his first work, "Civil 
Polity and Political Economy," and conceived 
the plan of his "History of the United 
.States." With the purpose of ha\ing easier 
access to the New York libraries in prejiaring 
the latter woi'k, in 1S45 he acct'pted an en- 
gagement as instructor in the Newark (N.J.) 
Academy. .Subsequently, while satisfactorily 
fulfilling the duties of this position, he car- 
ried his projected history to completion. He 
tiien went back to his home in Richmmid for 
a brief stay, to renew family ties and old 
friendships. While so occupied he was 
elected principal of Canandaigua Academy, 
where in his boyhood he had been a student. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



185 



Although remote from the metropolis, the 
position had substantial advantages. He ac- 
cepted it, and it was filled by him for the 
ensuing four years. Thereafter he devoted 
himself almost entirely to literature. Upon 
\vith(h'a\ving from the Canandaigua School, 
he stayed a short time at Allen's Hill, Onta- 
rio County. Then, in order to be near his 
publishers as well as the libraries, and that 
he might give his personal attention to the 
introduction of his works, he removed first to 
Astoria, L.I., in the vicinity of New York 
City, and later to the city itself. 

Perhaps the publications that brought him 
the widest reputation were his two series of 
school readers. The first series was entitled 
"The School and Family Readers," and was 
brought out by the Harper Brothers under a 
contract made with Mr. Willson before a 
word of the manuscript had been penned. 
The preparation of this work subsequently oc- 
cupied the author four years. Regarding its 
success, it is sufficient to state that, of the 
primer alone, the sales amounted to more than 
one million copies. Mis second series was 
published by the Lippincotts, of Philadelphia, 
and was also very successful. To these pub- 
lications for schools he afterward added a 
series of historical te.xt-books, which included 
a work on universal histor)' and an excellent 
work also on this country, Canada, and Mex- 
ico. Of more than twenty-five other works 
produced by Mr. Willson the most important 
is "The Wonderful Story of Old," in two 
large octavo volumes, handsomely illustrated, 
containing in narrative form, most attrac- 



tively told, the results of Biblical research up 
to that day. This publication elicited the 
warmest commendation from bishops and 
other prominent clergymen, from presidents 
of colleges, and from the [jress. Mr. Will- 
son's latest work is entitled "The Principles 
of Finance and the Philosophy of Bimetal- 
lism," which was published in 1896. 

Mr. Willson was united in marriage with 
Frances A. Pierpont, daughter of David Pier- 
pont, of Allen's Hill, Richmond, N. Y. Of 
the six children born of the marriage two 
failed to reach maturity. The others were: 
Caroline A., who is the wife of John Hicks, 
of Summit, N.J. ; Pierpont; Fcuinie E. : and 
Robert P. The mother was a member of the 
Baptist church. Mr. Willson, while a firm 
believer in the general doctrines of Christian- 
ity, could not conscientiously bind himself by 
any creed. Now, in his eighty-third year, 
one can discern no impairment of his facul- 
ties, while it becomes quickly obvious to one 
conversing with him that he is a man of the 
broadest culture and of a most liberal mind. 
He is held in the highest esteem by all ad- 
mitted to the privilege of his acquaintance. 



WILLIAM MATTHl'AV BROWN, an 
enterprising merchant of Cedarville, 
is a native of this place, born April 13, 
1857, son of Matthew and Hannah H. (Rocap) 
Brown. His father, who was born November 
13, 18 16, in Salem County, had all the edu- 
cational advantages offered by the [lublic 
schools. He followed the occupation of a 



i86 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



farmer until about the year 1847, when he 
came to Cedarvillc and engaged in the 
oyster business. He also operated a thresh- 
ing machine very successfully for some years. 
His last years were spent with his son, 
William M. On N<:)vember 23, 1839, he 
was united in matrimony with Hannah 
H. Rocap, tlaughter of Adrianne Rocap, 
of Hridgeton. They had eleven children, 
of whom seven grew to maturity; namely, 
I'^mma J., Edgar, Amanda, I'llizabeth, Maggie 
1'., William M., and Ella H. Amanda 
became the wife of James F. Everingham, 
of Lawrence township; Elizabeth, now de- 
ceased, -was the wife of George Wainwright; 
Maggie V. married George Venable, of 
Rridgeton ; and Ella It. married Henry 
luud, of Lawrence township. 

William Matthew Brown attended the pub- 
lic schools until he was eighteen years old. 
He then spent two years at the painter's trade. 
After that he became station agent of the 
Cumberland & Maurice River Railroad at 
CedarviUe, a position which he held until 
I 89 1. He left it then in order t<j give more 
attention to an increasing business in the 
shipping of produce, which he had started in 
1879. For several years he was the only 
jierson in the town engaged in this enterprise. 
He now iiaudles from three hundred thousand 
to five hundred thousand cjuarts of small fruits 
annually. He also carries on a considerable 
business in coal and fertilizers, started in the 
year 1884; and he is still the only coal dealer 
in the place. 

On June 27, 1894, he was married to Miss 



Ray Diament, daughter of Robert Diament, of 
CedarviUe, and has one child, Robert How- 
ard. Mrs. Brown is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, her husband belonging 
to the Second Presbyterian Church. In i)oli- 
tics Mr. Brown is an active Republican. He 
has served the community as member of the 
School Board for nine years and as clerk of 
the same board for seven years. In 1891 he 
was appointed Collector of Taxes, in 1892 he 
was elected to that office for the term of three 
years, and in 1895 he was re-elected for 
another term of three years. It is an unmis- 
takable indication of the high esteem in which 
he is held by the community at large, that 
his appointment to this office was made by a 
Democratic ]5oard, and that his subsequent 
elections thereto were accomplished by the 
Democratic majority in the town. He is Past 
Grand of Welcome Friends Lodge, Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd P'ellows; Past Councillor 
of CedarviUe Council, No. 45, Senior Order 
of United American Mechanics; and Past 
Master of Salome Lodge, No. 145, A. F. & 
A. M., of CedarviUe, N.J. 



f^OllN BOAS CLEVPLNSTINP:, man- 
ager of the only printing-office in 
Bridgeton exclusively de\-oted to joli 
work, was born December 7, 1S61, in Kimljcr- 
ton, Chester County, Pa., son of John and 
Sarah (Boas) Clevenstine. The Clevenstines 
are an old Penn.sylvania family of German 
origin. 

John Clevenstine, also a native of Chester 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



,87 



County, was an extensive land-owner and 
largely interested in the mule teams which 
were then used to switch or transfer cars in 
West Philadelphia. He also had a large min- 
ing interest, being engaged in transporting 
iron ore to the mills in I'hoenixville, Pa. 
The old bridge from Phcenixville to Mont Clare 
was constructed by his instrumentality, while 
he was one of the principal members of the 
Bridge Company. He was also one of the 
early stockholders of the old National Bank of 
Phcenixville. He took an active interest in 
public affairs, and served successively in a 
number of county offices. He was widely 
known anti highly respected as an authority 
in town questions. In politics he was a life- 
long Democrat. His wife was a daughter of 
John Boas, of Philadelphia. She had but one 
child by this union, John Boas Clevenstine, 
the subject of this biography. At the time of 
her marriage to John Clevenstine she was the 
Widow Dcttra, and had four children. Two 
of tiiese are now living, naineh': Jnhii, who is 
now at Oaks Station, Pa.; antl Benjamin, who 
is an attorney in Reading, Pa. The parents 
were Lutherans in religious belief. The 
father died in 1872, and the mother passed 
away in i SS i . 

John Boas Clevenstine, after receiving a 
public-school education in Chester County, 
was sent to Ursinus College in Montgomery 
County. He was graduated from the jirepara- 
tory course, and, yielding to the wish of an 
intimate friend, he decided to take the theo- 
logical course, entering tlie Freshman class in 
1877. On October 4 of the same year he was I 



injured in the Pickering Valley Railroad dis- 
aster, and laid up for eight weeks. Then, in 
spite of many pleas to return and complete 
the course of study, he entered a job printing- 
office in Philadeli)liia. Here he remained 
until the death of his mother, after which he 
entered the office of the Phcenixville Iiidcf in- 
dent. He subsequently became connected as 
compositor with the Daily Eagle of Reading, 
Pa. Later he served as proof-reader for the 
Reading Evening NclVS, which post he held 
some time, also having charge of the adver- 
tising department until 1882. He then started 
in business for himself. Five years afterward 
he consolidated this office with another and 
came away. He next entered the emjiloy of 
McCowan & Nichols, publishers of tiie 
Weekly Pioneer, with whom he remained as 
manager of the mechanical department for a 
year. Then he and S. A. Laningeach bought 
one-half interest in the Bridgeton Cltroniele, 
Mr. Clevenstine being the practical manager 
there, as his partner was in the post-office. 
During the two and a half years of association 
with that organ he was elected as Clerk of the 
Board of Freeholders, which position he re- 
tained two years. He was twice nominated 
for the assessorship of the Third Ward, 
which is strongly Repujjlican, while Mr. 
Clevenstine is a Democrat. Tiie last time he 
consented to run he cut down the opposing 
majority by one-half. I-'or a short time he was 
local editor of the Norristown Daily Register ; 
but, not wishing to move, he returnetl to 
the city, and started a job printing business 
on August I, 1894. All lines of job work are 



i88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



done here, and always got out on time. The 
office is at 40 South Laurel Street, where he 
employs a number of hands. 

Mr. CIcvenstine is Treasurer of ]5ridgeton 
l)ranch of Republic Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation of Newark, N.J., which does a good 
business. Me is Court Crier for Cumberland 
County; member of Junior Order of American 
Mechanics Council, of which he is Treasurer; 
a member of Knights of Malta, ICnights of 
Golden Eagle, and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. On P'ebruary 13, 1883, 
he married Miss Ella Garst, of Reading. 
Her father, George W. Garst, was one of the 
leading contractors and builders of the city. 
It was he who built the public government 
buildings. Mr. Clevenstinc and his wife are 
members of the Second Presbyterian Church. 
They have two children — Violet M. and 
Laura A. 




RANGE H. ADAMS, A.M., M.D., 
a leading physician and surgeon of 
X'ineland, now President of the Board 
of I'Lchication of this town, was boin in 
Rindge, N.H., January i, 1856. He is a 
grandson of Israel Adams, Jr., a native of An- 
dover, Mass., and his wife; Sally, daughter of 
Nathaniel Aihinis, of Ashlnu'iihani, Mass.; and 
more remoteh' he traces his descent from 
Henry Adams, who came to America about 
1636, settling at Braintree, Mass.; and among 
whose posterity have been numbered two Pres- 
idents of the United .States. 

Israel Adams, Sr., the great-grandfather of 
Dr. Adams, removed from Andover to Rind<re 



in 1772, when his son and namesake, Israel, 
was a child of four years of age. The birth 
date of Israel Adams, Jr., was the 8th of Jan- 
uary, 176S. He married Sally Adams on 
August 28, 1796; and to them was born on 
the 4th of March, 1S07, in the town of 
Rindge, a son, who bore the name of Albert. 
Mr. Albert Adams was a farmer in his native 
place during his life, and was also engaged in 
the lumber business. He held the office of 
Selectman, and was one of the District School 
Committee. He married Miss Mary Pollard, 
May 26, 1836. This lady was a daughter of 
Mr. Levi Pollard, of Winchendon, Mass. 
She was born June 22, 181 1, and was a sister 
of the Rev. Andrew Pollard, D. D., who was 
a divine of great reputation in the city of Bos- 
ton. The Pollard family was of patriotic 
stock, and the great-grandfather of Miss Pol- 
lard was one of those victorious soldiers who 
marched into Quebec during the war of the 
American Revolution. He was seventeen on 
the day of the victory, and used to recall with 
pride the celebration of his birthday. 

To Albert and Mary Adams seven children 
were born, namely: George A., who was a 
Captain in the One Hundred and Fifty-seventh 
New York Volunteers, ami who was fatally 
wounded at Gettysburg, dying a few da^'s after 
that memorable battle; Israel, who died in in- 
fancy; William, who died of fever when a lad 
of si.xteen ; John 15., a farmer of New Hamp- 
shire; l-^rancis A., who lives in Massachu- 
setts; Mary B., wife of Mr. I^eonard F. 
Sawyer; and Dr. Orange II. Adams, of \Mne- 
land. Mr. Albert Adams, the father, died 



I 




ORANGE H. ADAMS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



igi 



May 14, 1875. His wife survived him nine 
years, dying on the 31st of October, 1884. 
She was for forty years in the communion of 
the Congregational church. 

Orange H. Adams was educated in his boy- 
hood in the common schools of Rindge and 
East Jaffrey, N.H., and prepared for college 
at Ashburnham, Mass., entering Dartmouth 
in the fall of 1877. He was graduated in 
1 88 1 with the degree of A.B., having a com- 
mencement part. He belonged to the I'hi 
Beta Kappa and the Theta Delta Chi fraterni- 
ties. He then entered the Medical School, 
where he remained three years, graduating 
with the degree of M.D. After leaving Dart- 
mouth he engaged in special study at the 
New York Polyclinics, and in the summer of 
1884 came to Vineland, where he has ever 
since been jiractising his profession. In the 
last few years he has paid special attention to 
diseases of the eye, having taken special 
courses of study in this branch of medical 
science. He is a member of the Cumberland 
County Medical Association, of which he has 
been President. 

A strong, public spirit has always actuated 
Dr. Adams, and it was to a large degree 
through his efforts that the glass works were 
established in the city, besides many other 
manufacturing interests that were helped 
by him while serving as a member of the 
Vineland Improvement Company, in behalf of 
which he used his influence for seven years. 
He held offices of public trust, not only in 
Vineland but also in other towns. Besides 
being President of the Board of Trade in his 



own town, he has held the same position on 
the Board of Health and on the Board of Edu- 
cation in the township of Landis. The 
Tradesmen's Bank of Vineland owes some- 
thing to him also, as he was one of its organ- 
izers and Directors. Tailing in health some 
time ago, he was compelled to give up those 
of his offices which entailed too arduous labor 
upon him, and to devote himself more partic- 
ularly to his professional duties, which his 
large practice rendered sufficiently absorbing 
even to a man of his energy and capacity. 
Dr. Adams married first Miss Jessie C. 
Ballou, of Massachusetts, a daughter of 
George W. Ballou, an old veteran of the Ci\'il 
War. She died in May, 1894, leaving two 
children — Alice M. and Gertrude J. On the 
1 2th of June, 1895, Dr. Adams contracted a 
second marriage with Miss Clara J. Whitsitt, 
daughter of Mr. Joseph Whitsitt, of Paterson, 
N.J. Both the Doctor and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, of which 
the former is a Trustee. 



/^TeORGE BRANNIN, a well-known 
\f£J_ glass-blower of Millville and a na- 
tive of the town, was born August 29, 1854, 
son of Joseph and Margaret (Houck) Brannin. 
Joseph Brannin was also a native of Millville, 
where he received his education in the com- 
mon schools. Early in life he became a 
sailor. In tiiis calling he succeeded so well 
that at the age of eighteen he was ajipointcd 
commander of a vessel sailing between Mill- 
ville and Philadel])hia. His wife, Margaret, 



192 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



who was a daughter of William Houck, of 
Dorchester, N.J., had twelve children, of 
whom nine lived to maturity. These were: 
William, Sergent, John, Hannah Ann, Eben- 
czer, George, Eleanora, Newell, and Mark. 
Hannah Ann married Daniel Woodruff, of 
Bridgeton, N.J.; and Eleanora is the wife of 
Mr. Chance, of Millville. The family at- 
tended worship at the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which the mother was a member. 

George Brannin received a common-school 
education in his native city. He afterward 
learned the trade of glass-blower in the factory 
of Whitall, Tatum & Co., by which firm he is 
still employed. In 1895 he was appointed a 
member of the City Council, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the resignation of a member. He 
is Past Grand Master of Millville Lodge, In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. He also 
belongs to the Millville Lodge of the Knights 
of Pythias, and to the A. O. K. M. C. Mr. 
Brannin is a member of the E.xecutive Board, 
Branch 7, of the United Green Glass Workers' 
Association of the United States and Canada, 
and has been a representative to the national 
convention. He has also membership in the 
City Trades Council, and is an e.xecutive 
member of the Republican County Commit- 
tee. On June 29, 1877, he married Miss 
Lizzie L., daughter of Cornelius Lashley. 
They have had three children, of whom F"lora 
and Claude are living. Edward died at the 
age of six years. Mr. Brannin is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. 
Brannin, who was also in communion with 
that ciiurch, died some time ago. 



"ARRY L. WOODRUFF, one of the 
=^ prominent citizens of Deerfield, 
N.J., and belonging to that family 
for whom Woodruff Station is named, was 
born at Woodruff, August 28, 1855. 

His great-grandfather, and the ancestor of 
all the Woodruffs of New Jersey, was Ephraim 
Woodruff. He and his brother came from 
England to this country at an early period. 
His brother settled himself in Connecticut, 
and Ephraim came to New Jersey, where he 
settled on a large tract of wild land. The 
site of this ancestral estate was once the 
dwelling-place of an Indian tribe, and many 
arrow-heads have been found here, the relics 
of a past and gone race. Buying a very large 
tract of land in this section, I^jjhraim Wood- 
ruff established a home that still remains in 
possession of his descendants. 

The immigrant left a son, who bore the 
name of Lewis, and who was in reality the 
founder of the Methodist church in this 
region, as he erected the church edifice, and 
paid the minister's salary out of his own pri- 
vate funds. He also built a school-house on 
the adjacent land, so that the estate was sup- 
plied, like the feudal castles of old, with 
place of worship, a school, and all of the nec- 
essary institutions of life within the boun- 
daries of its broad acres. Lewis Woodruff 
died in 1867, aged si.xty-seven years. He 
was a man of wealth, leaving to each of his 
children a farm. His sons and daughters 
were: Susan, who married Mr. William 
Daughaday, wlunn she sur\-ives; Robert S., 
who lived here until his death in August, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•93 



1885; John S., the father of Mr. Harry L. 
Woodruff; Katie, now deceased, who was the 
wife of Mr. Holcroft; Lewis, who died in 
childhood; Lewis R. , who lived on the farm 
here until his death: Edward S., whose farm 
was next to the school-house; Maggie, who 
became the wife of the Rev. William Shimp, 
and is now a resident of Atlantic City; Jo- 
seph A., who owned a farm here, but finally 
moved to Bridgeton, and is now an ex-Coun- 
cilman of that city, and engaged in buying 
and selling real estate; and Thomas, the 
youngest, who fell heir to the old homestead, 
where he lived for many years, afterward re- 
moving to Atlantic City. 

John S. Woodruff was born in Deerfield on 
the 5th of November, 1829. He was educated 
in the school-house that stood on his father's 
farm. Here he remained, sharing in the 
home responsibilities until the date of his 
marriage to Miss Elizabeth Hitchner, which 
was May 8, 185 i. He then began farming on 
the place given him by his father, and on 
which he still lives. F"or a number of years 
he was engaged in cattle dealing, buying great 
droves of cattle, and selling them to the well- 
to-do farmers throughout Cumberland and 
Salem Counties. In this way he travelled 
about a good deal, though not over a very 
great extent of country, and was one of the 
largest cattle dealers of his time. His 
father's gift of land embraced a stretch of 
sixty acres, and to this he added by the pur- 
chase of an adjoining farm of eighty acres. 
On this land he has built one of the handsom- 
est residences in Ueerfield. He has always 



been a man of public affairs. He was one of 
the constituent stockholders of the Yineland 
Railroad, and it was owing to his energetic 
efforts that the town of Bridgeton ever en- 
joyed the benefits of two railways. This 
enterprise was the result of the conjoined 
efforts of Mr. Woodruff and Mr. Landis. 
When the road was a fact accomplished, the 
route lay very near Mr. Woodruff's property; 
and he secured the station, which was shortly 
to be built, on his farm, at the point where the 
highway is crossed by the road leading from 
Woodruff to Millville. In his honor it was 
called Woodruff Station. 

For the last quarter of a century Mr. John 
S. Woodruff has been engaged in an enter- 
prise which he himself inaugurated and devel- 
oped. In 1872 he devoted three acres of his 
land to the culture of strawberries and other 
small fruits, believing that he would find a 
ready market for them in the cities then sup- 
plied by the distant fruit-growing States. 
The result has proved the sagacity of his judg- 
ment. His fruit-fields have been enlarged 
till they now embrace more than twelve times 
the original number of acres. Commencing 
in a modest way, he has gradually established 
an enormous trade. Seeing the possibilities 
in their reach, his neighbors also planted 
their lands in the same way; and the shipping 
of the luscious red berries is now the chief 
business of the place. Mr. Woodruff alone 
gives employment to sixty pickers, and several 
hundred people find remunerative occupation 
in the strawberry fields of the various growers 
every summer. During the season there is a 



'94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daily export of strawberries from these farms 
which is estimated at forty thousand quarts. 
Five years ago it was impossible to get enough 
pickers in the neighborhood to fill the de- 
mands ; antl the growers were forced to send to 
Philadelphia, and import Italians by the car- 
load to gather the fruit. The South Jersey 
berries come in just between the South-grown 
and the North-grown berries, so there is an 
unfailing demand for them in the markc'ts. 
When it is remembered that thirty years ago 
there was not a field of strawberries grown in 
this section, Mr. Woodruff's energy, fore- 
sight, and judgment seem phenomenal, and 
his success, great as it has been, scarcely ade- 
quate to what he has accomplished, not only for 
himself but for the community. The receipts 
for the shipment of these berries to New 
York, Massachusetts, and the other Eastern 
States, amounts to above twenty- five thousand 
dollars annually; and the little Woodruff 
Station is, in consequence, one of the most 
important in the country, though there are no 
manufactures here. Pleased with the result 
of his enterprise, Mr. Woodruff has deter- 
mined to still further enlarge his business, 
and with this in view has lately set out a 
large orchard of Kieper pear-trees. 

To Mr. John S. Woodruff and his wife four 
children were born: Sadie H. (deceased), who 
married Mr. Frank E. Hale, of Cumberland ; 
Harry L., whose name is the initial word of 
this biography; Allie T., who died in her 
youth; and Warren C, who was born in 
March, 1870. The mother, Mrs. P^lizabeth il. 
Woodruff, was born April 12, 1831, in Pitt's 



Grove, Salem County. Her father, Matthias 
Hitchner, was for many years a farmer and resi- 
dent of that county, where he was well known. 
Mr. Jacob Hitchner, an uncle of Mrs. Wood- 
ruff, lived to be over one hundred years old. 
He was familiarly known through South 
Jersey as "Uncle Jake." Mr. and Mrs. John 
S. Woodruff are members of the Methodist 
church; and it is largely due to their support 
that the community has the privilege of 
divine service, for Mr. Woodruff has been the 
steward and Trustee of the church, which is 
built on his estate, for the last thirty-five or 
forty years, he having begun his church work 
when he was a young man of twenty-five years 
of age. He was one of the prime movers in 
the erection of the new church building; and 
he, together with the rest of the family, meet 
the greater part of the expenses of church ser- 
vice and ministration. He has been the 
superintendent of the Sunday-school held 
here for many years, and has striven faithfully 
to teach by precept as well as example. He 
has been honoreil by election to the best ]iub- 
lic offices, having been Collector of Deerfield 
for many years; and he has often been a dele- 
gate to conventions held for the consideration 
of public matters of interest. He has now, 
however, retired from active politics. He has 
always been firm in his allegiance to Democ- 
racy. 

Warren C. Woodruff was educated in Deer- 
field and the South Jersey Institute, and at 
fourteen years of age entered the railroad ser- 
vice. He was employed on the New Jersey 
Central, filling different positions on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'95 



trains from Bay Side to Winslow Junction. 
From train agent he was appointed cliief clerk 
at Port Norris, whence he was afterward trans- 
ferred to the station agency of Broadway. 
This situation he gave up to enter into a 
partnership with liis brother, Harry h., with 
whom he is now in business, under the firm 
name of Woodruff Brothers. He is the organ- 
ist of the church in which the family wor- 
ship. 

Harry I^. Woodruff attended the school on 
his father's farm, and then became a stutlent 
at the South Jersey Institute at Bridgeton. 
When he returned from Bridgeton, he remained 
with his father until his marriage. When the 
New Jersey Central Railroad came through 
Deerfield, he was immediately made its sta- 
tion agent at Wooilruff Station, and for twenty 
years has been the only person who has filled 
this position. He has a charming home on 
one of his father's farms near the station, 
which rivals that in which his childhood was 
passed. The commodious dwelling contains 
all of the latest improvements in the way of 
heating, ventilation, and sanitary arrange- 
ments, and is one of the handsomest in this 
locality. Mr. Harry L. Woodruff now has 
charge of both farms, his own and his father's, 
and manages the farming and berry-growing 
together as one great whole, leading a very 
busy life. He is also the general shipper for 
the various other growers in the neighbor- 
hood, who receive their pay through him; and 
he is the United States ICxpress agent. 

When the post-office was established at 
Woodruff, May lo, iS8i, his father, Mr. John 



S. Woodruff received the appointment of Post- 
master, an office he has held through the 
changing fortunes of the different administra- 
tions. Mr. Harry L. Woodruff fills the place 
of assistant in the post-office, where the mail 
matter is distributed for a wide territory. 
Two special fruit trains run from this depot 
daily, one to Boston, leaving in the morning, 
and one to New York, leaving in the after- 
noon, making the little station a busy centre 
during the summer season. 

Mr. Harry L. Woodruff was married on 
December 31, 1885, to Miss Lillie Martin, 
daughter of Samuel Martin, Postmaster at 
Pitt's Grove. She was born February 23, 
1861, in Pitt's Grove, and lived in that town 
until her marriage. She assisted her father 
in the post-office while he was Postmaster, 
and also helped him in the general affairs of 
the store which he conducted there. Mr. 
Samuel Martin was a son of Jacob Martin, and 
was a native of Philadelphia, where he was 
born in 1820. He married Miss Mary Ru- 
dolph, who was born in 1825 in the same city. 
Mrs. Woodruff's father died in 1S86. Her 
mother still survives. Both parents were 
members of the l^aptist Church of Pitt's 
Grove. 

Mr. Harry L. Woodruff has for many years 
been sent as delegate to the county and State 
conventions, and to those conventions that 
-nominate national Presidential delegates. He 
has been Town Clerk, and, since the passage 
of the law regarding registration, has held the 
office of Judge of Registration. He is a 
stanch Democrat and a faithful member of the 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is 
steward and Trustee, while his wife still holds 
her membership in the Baptist Church of 
Pitt's Grove, her native town. In religious, 
political, business, and social circles of Deer- 
field the family of Woodruff holds an honored 
place, and wields a strong influence. The 
name is a synonym of success in the locality 
where they have done so much for themselves 
and their neighbors. 




ARREN C. WOODRUFF, an en- 
terprising young business man, 
member of the firm of Woodruff Brothers, was 
born on his father's farm at Woodruff Station, 
N.J., March 10, 1870. He attended the pub- 
lic schools, the school building wherein he 
mastered the rudiments of knowledge being 
situated on his father's farm, and was also a 
student at South Jersey Institute of Bridge- 
ton, N.J. He began his business career at 
an unusually early age, obtaining a position 
on the New Jersey Central Railroad when he 
was but a lad of fourteen years. During most 
of the time that he was in the railroad service 
he was train agent, running between Bay Side 
and Winslow Junction. The conscientious 
discharge of his duties secureil for him speedy 
promotion, and he was shortly appointed chief 
clerk at Port Norris. Subsequently the com- 
pany promoted him to the more important po- 
sition of station agent at Broadway, N.J., 
which he retained until 1896, when he re- 
signed it to become a partner in the present 
firm of Woodruff Brothers. While located in 



Broadway he was agent for the United States 
Express Company, and also became interested 
in the commission business, being the heavi- 
est receiver at that place. Joining forces 
with his brother, H. L. Woodruff, who had 
already established a good business in the 
shipping of produce, they have since contin- 
ued together on the road to prosperity, having 
extended the enterprise so as to embrace other 
lines. Besides the practical bent of mind 
which seems to be a sort of natural heritage of 
this family, Mr. Woodruff possesses a decided 
talent for music, which gift is a source of 
pleasure to himself as well as to others. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which he is steward and organist. 
His father having taken an active part in es- 
tablishing and supporting the church that 
literally stands within the boundaries of the 
family estate, it is pleasant to note that the 
second generation of the name and blood 
stand fast in the faith. If the past is pro- 
phetic of the future, Mr. Woodruff's success 
in life would seem to be assured. 



ISAAC T. NICHOLS, an eminent jour- 
nalist of New Jersey, who, as a jioli- 
tician, has a long ami honorable record, 
was born in the city of Bridgeton, Cumberland 
County, N.J., March 22, 1848. His parents 
were Captain Isaac and Mary A. (M'Gear) 
Nichols. His paternal ancestors were among 
the early English settlers of the "Colony of 
Rhode Island and Providence Plantations." 
Some members of the family migrated thence 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



•07 



to New Jersey; and during the Revolutionary 
War they were residents of Deerfield, Cum- 
berland County, and were active in the patriot 
cause. 

Isaac Nichols, first, tlic great-grandfather 
of Isaac T. , was born in Deerfield in 1757, 
and died April i, iiSi7. Samuel Nichols, son 
of Isaac first, was also a native of Deerfield. 
lie was born in 1778, and died October 9, 
1828. In 1806 he was married to Catherine 
Carll, daughter of John Carll, a prominent 
citizen of Cumberland County, who was of 
German ancestry. The Carll family produced 
some noted men in the early days of New 
Jersey, who were leading citizens of Salem 
and Cumberland Counties. Samuel and Cath- 
erine (Carll) Nichols were the parents of the 
following children: Isaac, second, born No- 
vember 21, 1806; Thomas, born January 22, 
1809; John, May 26, iSio; Judith, June 20, 
1812; Samuel, December 28, 181 3; Phcebe, 
December 2, 1S15; Abigail, March 27, 181 7; 
and Parthenia M., F"ebruary 27, 1821. 

Isaac Nichols, son of Samuel and the 
father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Deerfield. He removed to Bridgeton, and 
became a resident of that city. In his early 
manhood he followed the sea, and was for a 
long time master of a vessel. The last years 
of his life he was foreman of the measuring 
department of the Cumberland Nail and Iron 
Company's pipe-mill. Although his father 
was a Democrat, Captain Nichols became affil- 
iated with the Whig party as soon as he was 
qualified to vote, and cast his first Presiden- 
tial ballot for John Q. Adams. Later he was 



one of the first adherents of the Free Soil and 
Republican parties in Cumberland County. 
In religious belief he was a Methodist. He 
died August 13, 1875. In 1835 he was united 
in marriage with Miss Caroline M'Gear. She 
dying, he married Mrs. Mary A. Garrison, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Middle- 
ton) M'Gear, of Bridgeton. Mary A. Nichols 
was born in 18 17, and died August 10, 1863. 
She was a member of the Methodist church 
and a zealous, earnest Christian from early 
girlhood. The M'Gears are a Scotch-Irish 
Protestant family. Elizabeth Middleton was 
a daughter of Nathan and Mary Middleton. 
Captain Nichols's family consisted of: Caro- 
line M'Gear, born P'ebruary 8, 1845; Isaac 
T., the subject of this sketch, born March 
22, 1848; Barclay R., born December 28, 
1849; Ann Maria, born March 19, 1852; and 
Mary E., born January 5, 1857. 

Isaac T. Nichols attended the Bank Street 
public school in Bridgeton, and at the age of 
seventeen began to learn the printer's trade in 
the office of the Chronicle. He became fa- 
miliar with all branches of newspaper work, 
and on October 8, £874, became editor of the 
Bridgeton Pioneer, and a member of the firm 
of M'Cowan & Nichols, publishers of that 
journal. In 1S86 the firm established the 
daily Pioneer which is still a regular visitor 
in the homes of the people of Bridgeton. As 
a journalist Mr. Nichols wields a facile pen, 
his intimate connection with public events 
giving him a wide field of personal observa- 
tion to draw- from; and his natural literary 
talent has been developed by years of news- 



igS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



paper work, the best course of training for a 
writer of the present day. In 1887 he built 
the business block in which the post-office 
is located, a handsome structure which cost 
twenty thousand dollars, and is a monument to 
his energy. 

In 1876, centennial year, Mr. Nichols was 
chosen to represent the First Assembly Dis- 
trict, on the ticket with General R. B. Hayes, 
and was re-elected the following year, serving 
on the Committees on Education, Revision of 
the Laws, Hanks and Insurance, State Library, 
and the special committee appointed to inves- 
tigate charges against certain State officials. 
He gained prominence in the House by his 
ability as a debater and his parliamentary 
tact and sound, practical judgment on impor- 
tant issues. In 1877 he originated and intro- 
duced a bill, which became a law, exempting 
all soldiers and sailors who served in the civil 
war from poll-tax; and he advocated the "cash 
hill," which prohibited the use of punch orders 
in the glass factory stores of South Jersey. 
II is speech on the report of the investigation 
of accounts and transactions of the Secretary 
of State was concise and to the point, and re- 
ceived the unanimous indorsement of both 
parties in the Assembly. In 1878 he was the 
effective advocate of the bill reducing the 
legal rate of interest from seven to six per 
cent, in the State of New Jersey. 

In 1880, when General Garfield was made 
President, Mr. Nichols was elected State Sen- 
ator on the Republican ticket, and served as 
the honest exponent of the interests of his 
constituents. He introduced and secured the 



passage of numerous important measures, in- 
cluding the act prohibiting the sale of ciga- 
rettes and tobacco in any form to children 
under sixteen years of age. Recognizing the 
value of the oyster industry as a source 
of prosperity in South Jersey, he introduced 
and had passed several bills of great impor- 
tance to the oyster interests of Cumberland 
County. He was for two years Chairman 
of the joint Committee on Printing, and 
of the joint Committee on Bicentennial 
Celebration. In 1880 also he was alternate 
delegate to the Republican National Conven- 
tion at Chicago as a Blaine man, when 
James A. Garfield was nominated over the 
famous three hundred and six. Again 
elected to the Senate in 1883, he served on 
important committees; and, taking part in 
the memorable contest with the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad concerning the right of way for 
their bridge at Kill von Kull, Staten Island, 
which gave them admission to New York 
State, made a telling speccli on that issue. 
The most important measure with which he 
was connected as Senator was that passed by 
the Senate in 1884, taxing railroad, telegraph, 
and telephone companies one-half of one per 
cent, on taxable property. In the advocacy of 
this bill, which, when passed, brought the 
State a revenue of fifteen million dollars, Mr. 
Nichols was associated with his intimate per- 
sonal friend. Governor Griggs. Mr. Nichols 
was also one of the Senators who sat on the 
impeachment of Patrick H. Laverty, State 
prison keeper, who was tried by the Senate, 
and expelled for immorality. Though Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



199 



Nichols was the youngest man ever elected to 
the State Senate from Cumberland County, 
the soundness and impartiality of his views on 
State matters and his earnest and eloquent 
advocacy of legislation in the interest of 
morality, together with his loyalty to the 
cause of economy and thorough reform, which 
often led him to vote against his own personal 
interests, won for him not only the confidence 
and high regard of his constituents, but the 
esteem of even political opponents. 

In 1884 he was a delegate to the Republican 
Convention at Chicago which nominated James 
G. Blaine, his choice for President; and in 
the campaign of 1888 he was sent out by the 
Republican Executive Committee of New 
Jersey, and made a number of speeches in 
different parts of the State. During the cam- 
paign of 1895 he took an active part in the 
election of Governor Griggs, having been 
again sent out by the Republican Committee 
as speaker. He has for twenty years been a 
delegate to Republican State Conventions, 
and taken an active part in forwarding the in- 
terests of his party. A member of the Board 
of lulucation of Bridgeton for nine years, he 
was President two terms, and has long taken 
an interest in school matters, advocating the 
erection of the splendid liigh-school building 
in that city, which was carried after a hot con- 
test. 

August 21, 1869, Mr. Nichols was married 
to Emma, daughter of George Remstcr and 
grand-daughter of Judge George Remster, of 
Salem County, New Jersey. Judge Remster's 
grandfather, Frederick Remster, came origi- 



nally from Amsterdam, Holland, and settled 
in Salem County, where the family has since 
occupied a prominent position. 

Mr. Nichols is a Past Grand of Bridgeton 
Lodge, No. 129, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Bridgeton, and a Past District 
Deputy Grand Master. In 1892 he was 
chosen Grand Master of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, the first Grand Master in 
New Jersey, and at the expiration of his term 
of service was elected Representative to the 
Supreme Lodge, which met in 1893 in To- 
ronto, Canada, and in 1894 in San I'rancisco, 
Cal. He is also connected with other benevo- 
lent and beneficiary societies and is a promi- 
nent member of the Republican League of 
Bridireton. 




ENJAMIN CHANDLER SKIN- 
NER, who died March 18, 1896, 
was a widely known contractor and 
builder, and a prominent and esteemed citizen 
of Landis, Cumbcrlantl County, N.J. He was 
born in Dana, Worcester County, Mass., Oc- 
tober 4, 1816, the son of Benjamin and Lydia 
(Hoskins) Skinner, and was a representative 
of one of the old and respected families of that 
town. His grandfather, Benjamin Skinner, 
Sr. , was there engaged throughout life in the 
honored vocation of farming. He served his 
country in the war of the Revolution, and 
also in that of 18 12. He married, and was the 
father of a large family of children, ot whom 
five daughters and two sons grew to maturity. 
Mr. Benjamin Skinner, Sr., died in 1841, at 
at the venerable age of eighty-seven years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Benjamin, Jr., the elder of his two sons, 
was a native of Dana. He passed his boy- 
hood and early manhood at the paternal home, 
receiving his education in the district schools. 
He co-operated with his father in the work on 
the farm until he became of age, when he 
learned the trade of stone cutting, which he 
followed as an occupation for a long period. 
Previous to the last twenty years of his life, 
which were devoted to his chosen calling, he 
owned a farm of about one hundred acres, 
nine-tenths of which he kept under cultiva- 
tion. He was joined in wedlock with Miss 
Lydia, the daughter of Elkanah and Lydia 
(Morse) Hoskins, of Dana, Mass. Mr. 
Hoskins was a farmer. He and his wife were 
the parents of three children, namely: Lydia, 
the wife of Mr. Skinner; Lynda, who is now 
Mrs. Jacob Amsden ; and Lettie, the wife of 
Josiah Doubleday. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner 
were blessed in the birth of a large family of 
nine chiklren, as follows: Elkanah; Otis; 
Lois L., Mrs. Horr; Benjamin Chandler, of 
this sketch; Merrick, who died at the age of 
eleven years; Hannah V., who is now Mrs. 
Austin Doane, of Dana, Mass. ; Mindwell, 
the wife of I'eirce Horr, of Dana; Clarissa, 
now Mrs. Lendell Thayer; and Elias. 

Benjamin Chandler Skinner, the fourth 
chiKl nametl above, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools of his native town. At the con- 
clusion of his period of mental training he 
applied himself to the acquirement of a 
thorough knowledge of carpentering. After 
plying his trade for three years as a journey- 
man, he bought out his employer, and con- 



ducted a sash and blind factory, and was also 
engaged in contracting and building. He was 
one of the most prominent and active builders 
of Athol Centre, Mass., in which town he 
erected about one-third of the buildings. In 
1865 he removed to Vineland, N.J., where he 
purchased a farm of about twenty-five acres, 
which he devoted mainly to the cultivation of 
fruit. Toward the close of his life he dis- 
posed of the greater portion of his estate, re- 
serving only about ten acres, on which he 
made his home till his death. 

Mr. Skinner was twice married. In Sep- 
tember, 1840, he was united in wedlock with 
Miss Mary R. Stockwell, daughter of Josiah 
Stockwell, of Athol, Mass. Mr. Stockwell 
conducted for the long period of forty years a 
stage route from Brattleboro, Vt., to Worces- 
ter, Mass. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner became the 
parents of three children, only one of whom 
now survives; namely, Mary Jane, who is the 
wife of Joseph Houghton, of Athol. Being 
called upon in 1864 to mourn the loss of his 
first wife, Mr. Skinner on September 16, 
1864, was married to Mrs. Mary L. Amsden, 
the daughter of John Battle, of Athol. She 
was the widow of Festus F. Amsden, with 
whom she was joined in matrimony April 27, 
1845. By her first mar-riage she had nine 
children, seven of whom attained to maturity, 
namely: ICUiott F. ; Charles; Fred; Mary 
Ella, who married Frank Fish; Carrie M. ; 
Frances, who is now the wife of Reuben 
Starkweather, of V^ineland; and Linda, who 
is a school teacher in Vineland. Charles and 
Fred are associated in the clothing business 




• U 



JOHN YATES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



203 



in Athol, Mass., under the partnership style of 
Amsden & Amsden, and are among the lead- 
ing firms of that line of goods in the place. 
Charles Amsden married Miss Jennie Dun- 
bar, of Athol, and they have three children; 
namely, Maud, Ralph, and 13uston. Fred 
Amsden married Miss Helen Davis, of Bald- 
vvinville, Mass. ; and from their union have 
come two children — Ruth and Mildred. 

Mr. l^enjamin C. .Skinner was among the 
most prominent and respected citizens of 
Landis, and he served his fellows in several 
important and responsible capacities. In 1S67 
he was elected a member of the Township 
Committee, and in the following year he was 
appointed Superintendent of Roads. He had 
the supervision of all the roads in the town 
until 1S92 and of those in the borough until 
1894. He had under his care from 1867 to 
the end of his days the building of bridges 
in the town, and during his administration he 
constructed in the town nearly four hundred 
bridges. 



T^AP 



APTAIN JOHN YATES, of whom a 
1 portrait is here presented, is a well- 



K^ 



known grocer and ship-chandler of 
Hivalve, this county. A resident of Port 
Norris, he was born in the township at 
Mauricetown, F"ebruary 19, 1836, son of 
Klmer and Catherine (Shellhorn) Yates. 
John Yates, his grandfather, who was a black- 
smith by trade, spent his younger days in 
Haleyville, but subsequently resided in New- 
port, where he owned a house and a shop ad- 
joining it. He was twice married. The 



grandmother of Captain Yates was Jane, who 
had three children — Elmer, Jane, and John. 
The grandfather became blind several years 
before his death. 

I{lmer Yates was born in Newport, Decem- 
ber 11, 1/99, just three days before the death 
of Washington. His boyhood days were 
spent there, alternately engaged in farm work 
and attending school. Later he ubtained 
further instruction at an evening school. He 
was afterward engaged in carrying wood from 
the Maurice River to Philadelphia, owning 
and commanding his sloop for many years. 
When the government breakwater was started, 
he landed the second load here. He carried 
stone for it for several years, and coal for 
some time, from the Schuylkill River to New 
York and different points in New England. 
He was captain of his own boat probably for 
half a century. After a short time spent in 
the oyster business he retired to a small farm 
in Haleyville, where he continued to live for 
twenty-two years. His wife, Catherine, was 
a daughter of Lewis Shellhorn, who was an 
extensive land-owner in Haleyville, of German 
origin, and belonged to one of the oldest fam- 
ilies there. She had seven children, five of 
whom lived to maturit)-. These were: Jane, 
who married Parent Sharp, of Dividing Creek, 
this county; Elizabeth, the wife of Jacob 
Shinn, a brother of Samuel Shinn, who, serv- 
ing in the Civil War, fought in the battle of 
Chancellorsville, and was never after heard 
from; John, the subject of this sketch; Cath- 
erine, now deceased, who married Ziba Pagan, 
of Dividing Creek; and Lucius E. Yates, re- 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL Rp:VIEVV 



siding in Port Norris. Samuel Shinn's 
widow and her son Jacob are now living in 
Elmer, N.J. Elmer Yates died in 1887, at 
the age of eighty-eight years. His wife, who 
was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, [jassed away in 1868. 

Captain Jolm Yates received his education 
in Haleyville. At the age of thirteen years 
he shipped as cook on a Maurice River sloop, 
and worked in that capacity for five years. 
He was afterward in the crew of a coasting- 
vessel sailing from ports in New England to 
Florida. When he was twenty-four years of 
age he became commander of the schooner 
"John Compton," and sailed that vessel for 
four years. In 1862 Captain Yates was taken 
sick, antl was laid up for three years. For 
some time after this he gave his services for a 
monthly salary. In 1866 he bought a 
schooner, which he ran as a trading-vessel in 
Chesapeake Hay. In the period of his seafar- 
ing life, which lasted until 1884, he never 
suffered sliipwreck. When he al)andoned tiie 
sea he removed from Haleyville to l?ivalve. 
Here he has since been engaged in grocery 
and ship-chandlery business, becoming one of 
the leading men in his line. He owns sev- 
eral boats profitably engaged in oyster fishing, 
an:l employing a number of men. The first 
post-office in Hivalve was established at his 
solicitation, and he served as tlie first Post- 
master for a term of four years. He is a 
stockholder in the Cumberland Bank of 
Bridgeton, where one hundred-dollar shares 
are now worth four hundred dollars. Al)out 
five years ago Captain Yates bought the Dr. 



Fithian place in Port Norris, and has since 
made it his residence, although retaining the 
house in Haleyville. 

On August 10, 1 86 1, Captain Yates was 
united in marriage to Miss Ann Walker, of 
Haleyville, daughter of George and Elizabeth 
Walker. Mr. Walker was an oysterman and 
captain of a boat. By his marriage Captain 
Yates became the father of three children; 
namely, William, "Kate, and J. Leroy. Will- 
iam, who is associated with his father in 
business, married Miss Caroline McElwee, a 
daughter of David and Sarah McElwee, and 
has two children — Mabel and Flora. Kate 
is the wife of Harry Lee, an oysterman of 
Port Norris, and has two children — Edith and 
William Lee. Captain Yates and his wife are 
honored members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



«m•^^ 




LLIAM FRANKLIN JOSLIN, a 
prosperous general farmer of New- 
port, Cumberland County, N.J., and a veteran 
of the Civil War, was iiorn in Roadstown, this 
State, October 2, 1837, son of William and 
Deborah (Henderson) Joslin. Mr. Joslin's 
paternal grandfather was Zaccheus Joslin, a 
native of New Jersey, who married Naomi 
Gaudy, and reared a family of seven children, 
two sons and five daughters. He was a large 
land-owner in New Jersey and very ])rospor- 
ous, living to reach a good old age. 

His son, William Joslin, was born in New 
Jersey on September 13, 1813. He acquired 
a good education, and in young manhood 
began teaching school, which occupation he 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



205 



followed for many years, but finally settled 
upon a farm in Newport. He also engaged in 
the oyster-fishing industry, being for several 
years captain of a vessel. His last days were 
passed upon his farm in this town, where he 
died July 8, 1884. His wife, Deborah Hen- 
derson, whom he married January 28, 1835, 
and who died on August 13, 1842, was a 
daughter of Nathan Henderson. She was a 
member of the Methodist church. 

William I'ranklin Joslin, who is the only 
child of his parents that lived to maturity, 
passed his boyhood in attending the public 
schools of Newport ; and at an early age he 
started in life as an oyster fisherman. On 
September 4, iS6i, he enlisted as a private in 
Company K, Sixth Regiment, New Jersey 
Volunteers, for service in the Civil War; and 
he was present at all the battles fought by the 
Army of the Potomac, until his discharge in 
1862. He then went to Kansas, where he 
took up farming land; and after a residence 
there of four years he sold his Kansas pro[i- 
erty, and, returning to Newport, bought his 
present farm of thirty acres, with fine private 
oyster grounds and marsh lands. His land is 
desirably located and extremely productive, it 
being especially well adapted to the raising of 
garden truck, to which he devotes his prin- 
cipal attention, cultivating besides vegetables 
about two and one-half acres of strawberries. 

On February 8, 1856, Mr. Joslin married 
Ruth Anna Newcomb. Slie is a daughter of 
Nathan Newcomb, whose ancestors came from 
the west of England, probably from Devon- 
shire. Mrs. Joslin has the records of her 



family back to 1635, she being of the eighth 
generation. Her ancestors in direct line on 
the paternal side were as follows: first, Cap- 
tain Andrew Newcomb; second. Lieutenant 
Andrew Newcomb; third. Captain Joseph 
Newcomb; fourth, William Newcomb, farmer; 
fifth, Nathan Newcomb, farmer; si.\th, Will- 
iam Newcomb, farmer; seventh, Nathan New- 
comb. 

Nathan Newcomb, of the seventh genera- 
tion, Mrs. Joslin's father, was born October 
I, 1 8 19. He learned the carpenter's and 
shoemaker's trades, which he followed in 
Greenwich for many years. Although his 
sight has failed, he is otherwise vigorous and 
hearty to-day. He married Kllen Walker, 
who was born March 18, 1826, daughter of 
Richard and Ann (Carrison) Walker, the for- 
mer of whom was born in September, 1803, 
and the latter in 18 10. Nathan and Ellen 
(Walker) Newcomb were the parents of three 
children, namely: Charles; Ruth Anna, who 
is now Mrs. Joslin; and Ellen. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joslin have two children, as 
follows: Sherman, who was born December 
19, 1865, and who married Maggie L. Spen- 
cer; and Ella H., widow of Richard J. Gei- 
singer, late of Bridgeton. Mr. and Mrs. 
Joslin enjoy pleasant social relations, and are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



,HARLES TRACEY HILL, .M.D., 
a prominent physician of Dividing 
Creek, Cumberland County, N.J. , 
was born in Cohocton, Steuben County, N.Y., 




2o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



February 8, 1836, being a son of John J. and 
Emeline E. (Tracey) Hill. 

His grandfather, Timothy Titus Hill, was 
a native of the State of Vermont. He had a 
large family of children, of whom the eight 
following attained maturity: the Rev. Charles 
Orville Hill; Reulah, who became the wife of 
a Mr. Barber; John J.; Abner; Sarah, who 
married Mr. A. McOuigg, of Steuben County, 
New York ; Harlow ; Harriet, who married a 
Mr. Chambcrlin, of Michigan; and Henry F. 

John J., the • third in the group above 
named, was born in V'ermont in December, 
1806. He enjoyed in his boyhood very 
limited educational advantages. After leav- 
ing school he learned the hatter's trade; and 
he subsequently engaged in that business at 
Rushville in Ontario County, N. Y. , in coni- 
[KUiy with his brother, Henry F., under the 
firm name of Hill Brothers. Several years 
later the partnership was dissolved, he dispos- 
ing of his interest in the trade to his brother, 
and returning to his parents" home in Steuben 
County. He there ]iurchased an estate adjoin- 
ing his father's farm, and for several years he 
and his father engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits together. He always kept two hun- 
dred sheep on the average and about twenty 
head of cattle, which latter he raised for beef. 
He also raised a considerable number of 
horses, having at times as many as fifteen 
horses and colts. Mr. Hill resitletl there 
operating his farm until 1856, when he pur- 
chased a grist-mill at Naples in Ontario 
County, N.Y., still, Imwever, letaining the 
four farms which he had ac(.|uiretl thiough his 



energy and mercantile ability. At the time 
of his last-mentioned purchase his property 
was appraised at fourteen thousand dollars, 
and was without the least pecuniary encum- 
brance. He had conducted the mill about 
three years when there occurred a very large 
and disastrous freshet, which damaged his 
property to the extent of more than three 
thousand dollars' worth; and later another 
freshet affected his possessions to such a de- 
gree that he was financially ruined, and he 
was obliged to direct his attention to some 
other means of livelihood. 

It happened that when he was a young man 
he had studied medicine with a physician in 
Auburn, N.Y., whither his parents had re- 
moved from Vermont when he was about five 
years old. Of this circumstance he deter- 
mined to make good use; and about two years 
after his calamity he met an electric physi- 
cian, with whom he prosecuted medical stud- 
ies, and from whom he purchased a galvanic 
battery. He then removed to I'enn Yan, 
Yates County, N.Y., and there practised his 
profession for several years, very successfully 
treating chronic troubles. He subsequently 
moved to Seneca, where he enjoyed a very 
prosperous and lucrative practice, and from 
there changed his residence to Cayuga County, 
not far distant from Moravia. That ■^as in 
1862, and just then there was raging through 
all that region an epidemic of diphtheria. 
He had as many demands as he was able act- 
ually to supply to treat with electricity and 
with one or two other remedies which he ap- 
plied. His ministration was exceptionally 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



207 



successful, he seldom failing even in the case 
of patients who had been offered no encourage- 
ment, and had been despaired of by the regu- 
lar physicians. Two or three years later he 
removed to Northville, in the same county, 
where he purchased a homestead. He subse- 
quently resided at Poughkeepsie, whence he 
removed after a little time to Coldwater, 
Mich., where he purchased a large dwelling 
and established an invalids' home. This he 
conducted for about five years, or until 1872. 
Death overtook him in the month of Septem- 
ber, 1874. 

He was united in marriage with Miss 
luneline E. Tracey in 1835; and they became 
the parents of seven children, five of whom 
grew to maturity, the remaining two dying in 
infancy, one of them being a twin brother of 
John J. They are as follows: Charles Tracey, 
the eldest-born, who is the direct subject of 
this sketch; John ]., who is now a resident of 
Cleopatra, Mo. ; Charlotte, who married Sam- 
uel Lu.xmore, now a resident of Grass Lake, 
Mich. ; Ann Eliza, who is married and resides 
at Constantine, Mich.; and William II., who 
lives in Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. John J. Hill was a very energetic 
Abolitionist, and he was reputed to be one of 
the conductors of what was known as the 
underground railroad of anti-slavery times. 
While a lad he many times rode all night 
assisting fugitive slaves to make good their 
esca])e to Canada. In national politics he 
was at first a Whig and later a member of 
the Republican party. He was actively inter- 
ested in local and national concerns, though 



not an aspirant for official distinction. Re- 
ligiously, he was a Presbyterian, and was in 
fellowship with the church of that denomina- 
tion at Naples, Ontario County, N.Y., of 
which he was at one time a Trustee. His 
parents were affiliated with the Presbyterian 
church at Liberty, Steuben County, N. Y. 

Charles Tracey Hill acquired his early edu- 
cation in the common schools of Naples town- 
ship, which he attended about three months 
in the year. He continued his studies at the 
Naples Select School, whence he went to 
Franklin Academy at Prattsburg, Yates 
County, N. Y., where he worked to pay his 
way. During the latter part of his period of 
schooling he read medicine somewhat. Until 
his twenty-seventh year he co-operated with 
his father in the work on the farm, helping 
him to recover from his pecuniary misfortune. 
After his marriage in 1862 he commenced to 
apply the electric treatment with his father, 
and during this time he was still residing in 
Cayuga County. In .Sejjtember, 1864, how- 
ever, he removed to Landis township, settling 
on a farm owned by his wife's father. There 
he operated the farm during the summer ami 
engaged in school teaching in the winter ; but 
about two years later he changed his residence 
to Dividing Creek, where he established him- 
self in the practice of medicine. In 1880 he 
matriculated in the Penn Medical University, 
from which he graduated in the class of 1881. 
-Since that time he has enjoyed a very extensive 
and lucrative practice, the demands of Iiis pro- 
fession requiring the keeping of two horses. 
He occupies a small farm of ai)out eleven acres, 



2 08 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



on which he as an avocation raises garden 
vegetables. 

On November 28, 1862, Dr. Mill wedded 
Miss Hannah Wing, a daughter of James W. 
Wing, a resident of Naples, Ontario County, 
N.Y. Into their home have come three chil- 
dren, two of whom are still spared to them, 
namely: H. Alice; and John Tracey, who 
lives in Dividing Creek. 

Dr. Hill is identified with the social life of 
the community; and he is a member of Purity 
Council, No. 206, at Dividing Creek, of the 
Independent Order of the United American 
Mechanics. In national politics he is found 
in the ranks of the Republican party, to whose 
principles he gives his firm and constant 
allegiance. His religious faith and sym- 
pathies bring him into cordial relations with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church of Dividing 
Creek, whose services he regularly attends, 
and to the support of which he liberally con- 
tributes. 




I.V. CHARLES C. TILLEY, the 



loved pastor of the Eirst Baptist 
Church of Bridgeton, was born in 
Sidney, Me., January 12, 1850, son of the Rev. 
William and Elizabeth (Amsbury) Tilley. 
Mr. Tilley comes from an old English family 
of tiiat name. William Tilley, of England, ar- 
rived in Boston, Mass., in 1660. He was a 
rope-maker by trade, and found the business 
so profitable that he sent for the three sons of 
his uncle, William Tilley, also of England; 
namely, William, John, and James. From 
these have descended the Tilleys of United 



States and Canada. The eldest brother, Will- 
iam, finally settled in Newport, R.I. He 
had one son, who was known as Deacon Will- 
iam Tilley. Deacon Tilley was born in New- 
port, R.I., October 19, 1738, and died April 
14, 1825. He had seventeen children, of 
whom Thomas, born in Newport, March 16, 
1767, who died June 16, 1814, was the sixth 
in line. Thomas married Mary Sinkins, Sep- 
tember 7, 1788. She died October 8, 1844, 
having been the mother of nine children. 
The youngest of these was the Rev. William, 
the father of Charles C. 

The Rev. William Tilley first saw the light 
August 25, 1808, in Newport, R.I. After 
graduating from the public schools of that 
town he served his time at cabinet-making, 
became a skilled workman, and started in bus- 
iness for himself. But, naturally gifted with 
an uncommon degree of intelligence, he as- 
pired to a higher plane of life, and prepared 
himself to enter college. This he accom- 
plished at the Pawtuxet Academy, under the 
instruction of Dr. Loomis, and then obtained 
admission to Waterville College, now Colby 
University. After taking a four years' 
course with the purpose of qualifying himself 
for the ministry, he graduated in the class of 
1840. Two years afterward he was ordained 
in -Sidney, Me., the field of his first pastorate. 
He was subsequently offered the degree of 
D.D. by his Alma Mater, but he modestly de- 
clined the honor. He died October 2, 1882, 
at the age of seventy-four years. His wife, 
IClizabeth, was a daughter of Israel Anislmry, 
a prominent I'ree Mason of Providence. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



209 



was married to her April 8, 1833; and they 
had seven children, of whom six grew to ma- 
turity. These were: Thomas, Catherine, 
William Henry, George, Lauriston G., and 
Charles C. Catherine died at the aire of eisch- 
teen, and George in the year 1864. Will- 
iam Henry resides in Providence; and Lauris- 
ton G., in Sidney. 

The Rev. Charles C. Tilley, accompanying 
his father in the various changes of his pas- 
toral charge, obtained the total of his early 
education in contributions from the public 
schools of Jefferson, West Waterville, and 
Jefferson again, both towns of Maine. At the 
age of seventeen he engaged in school teach- 
ing, which, with other work, he continued for 
two years. Then he fitted himself for college 
at Waterville Classical Institute. In due 
time he entered Colby University, and subse- 
quently graduated therefrom in the class of 
1876, the first to furnish the institution with 
a President. Soon after graduating he was 
ordained in the First Church of Nobleboro. 
After officiating at Nobleboro for one year he 
spent two years in the Newton Theological 
Seminary. Then he had charge of Fairfield, 
Me., for three years; of St. George, Me., for 
a brief pastorate, owing to the illness of his 
wife; of Nobleboro again for two years; of 
Foxcroft, Me., for nearly the same space of 
time; and of Lewiston, Me., for five years. 
In the latter place he found the church bur- 
dened by a heavy debt, which he was instru- 
mental in discharging. In 1891 he came 
from Lewiston to Bridgeton, where he has 
since labored zealously in his vocation, win- 



ning the lo\-e of his flock and the esteem of 
the general public. 

In 1S76, A]iril 28, he was united in matri- 
mony with Lydia, tiaughter of Walter Rath- 
bun, of Providence. The union was blessed 
by the birth of four children; namely, F"rank 
W., Alice, George, and Florence. Frank W. 
and George are now students of Bucknell Uni- 
versity, the former in the class of 1898, and 
the latter in the class of 1899. In his earlier 
years Mr. Tilley was a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He still be- 
longs to the Delta Kappa Epsilon Society 
and to the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. 




YRON J. KIMBALL, senior mem- 



ber of the firm of Kimball, 
Prince & Co., who conduct an ex- 
tensive lumber business in Vineland, was 
born December 17, 1846, in Wallingford, Vt., 
son of Charles A. and Caroline C. (Kent) 
Kimball. William Kimball, the grandfather 
of Myron J., went from Massachusetts to V'er- 
mont, where his son, Charles A., was born. 
When a young man this son settled in the 
town of Wallingford, and was there engaged 
in the contracting and building business dur- 
ing the greater part of his life. On April 13, 
1865, he was accidentally killed by the unex- 
pected fall of a building that he was taking 
down. While he gave no special attention to 
politics, he took a leading part in school 
affairs. His wife, Caroline C. , was a daugh- 
ter of William Kent, of Wallingford, who was 
one of the early settlers of that town and a 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



descendant of the old Kent family of Leicester 
in Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was 
known as Esquire Kent, and was highly es- 
teemed by his townsmen. Charles Kimball's 
children were: Myron J. and Eliza K. The 
latter married Freeman S. Hale, of Vineland, 
N.J. The mother died in 1857. 

Myron J. Kimball attended the public 
schools of Wallingford until he was fifteen 
years of age. He then went to Winchendon, 
Mass., where his sister was living, and 
became a student in the high school of 
that place. In January, 1866, he came to 
Vineland, and engaged in the lumber and 
mill business in the employ of Earle & But- 
trick. Here he was afterward promoted to the 
position of clerk, and later on was placed in 
charge of the business. After Messrs. Earle 
& Buttrick sold out to D. A. Newton & Co., 
Mr. Kimball was retained in the position of 
manager until 1871, when he, in company 
with W. V. and John Prince, purchased the 
business. In 1886 John Prince sold his in- 
terest to his partners; but the title of the 
firm, Kimball, Prince & Co., remained un- 
changed. Since this firm first took hold of 
the business it has doubled in magnitude. 
They are now engaged in the manufacture 
of sashes, doors, and blinds, while dealing 
in lumber and building materials of all 
kinds. They have a branch establishment at 
Millville and another at Avalon, Cape May 
County; and they give employment to be- 
tween twenty-five and thirty men. They are 
now the oldest lumber dealers in Southern 
New Jersey. 



On June 3, i86g, Mr. Kimball was married 
to Miss Clara A. Prince, a daughter of John 
Prince, who came to this city from Maine. 
He has one son living, Eugene Myron, who, 
attending the public schools for the usual 
period, was a student of the South Jersey In- 
stitute at Bridgeton, and finally completed a 
business course at Prickett's Commercial Col- 
lege in Philadelphia. Eugene M. is now as- 
sociated with the lumber firm, having charge 
of the ofifice business. The elder Mr. Kim- 
ball votes the Republican ticket. While not 
taking especial interest in politics, all move- 
ments looking to public improvements elicit 
his hearty support. He was one of the pro- 
moters and organizers of the Vineland Na- 
tional Bank, started in May, 1883, with a 
capital stock of fifty thousand dollars. At 
the first meeting of the shareholders he was 
chosen a Director and Vice-President, and 
served until the fall of 1883. The first Presi- 
dent then resigned, and Mr. Kimball was 
elected to the vacant office. At the end of 
the first si.\ months following its organization 
the bank declared a dividend of three per 
cent. It never paid less than si.\ per cent, 
since its establishment, and is now paying 
three and a half per cent, semi-annually. At 
present it has an undivided surplus of thirty- 
one thousand dollars. Mr. and Mrs. Kimball 
are influential members of the Baptist church, 
in which he is a Deacon and has served as 
Trustee. For many years he was superinten- 
dent of the Sunday-school, and all branches 
of the church work have felt the influence of 
his interest and co-ojjeration. Mr. and Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Kiiiiliall reside in their pleasant and substan- 
tial home at 534 Montrose Street. 




'STEPHEN B. DUREEE, a retired 
merchant of Millville, N.J., was 
born in Madison, Madison County, 
N. Y. , Februar}' 12, 181 5, son of Samuel and 
Judith (Simmons) Durfee. The father, who 
was a native of Little Compton, R.I., re- 
ceived a good, jjractical education in the com- 
mon schools of that place. At the age of six- 
teen years he removed to Madison with his 
mother, his father having died a short time 
before. In Madison they purchased a farm, 
which he carried on until his marriage. 
Then he bought an adjoining farm, and culti- 
vated it until 1S65, when he retired from ac- 
tive labor. Two years later he came to Mill- 
ville, and made his home with his son, 
Stephen H., during the remaining years of his 
life. His wife, Judith, was a daughter of 
Benjamin Simmons, of Madison. Her father 
was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and 
in consequence she received a pension from 
the government. She bore her husband nine 
children, of whom eight attained maturity; 
namely, Mary, Stephen B., Susanna, Alisha, 
Ro.xana, Benjamin A., Samuel G., and Cor- 
nelius S. Mary became the wife of David 
Stuart; Susanna, the wife of William A. 
Simmons; and Roxana, the wife of Benjamin 
Bump. The father was a Quaker and the 
mother a Presbyterian. 

Stephen B. Durfee, who was educated in 
the common schools of Madison, remained with 



his parents on the farm until he was twenty- 
two years old. On attaining his majority he 
purchased a farm, on which he settled after 
his marriage. About a year later he sold it, 
and engaged in the shoe manufacturing busi- 
ness in partnership with John Peckhani, under 
the firm name of Peckham & Co., for about a 
year. He then went to Utica, N.Y., where 
he became a partner of Obadiah Lawton, firm 
of Lawton & Durfee, manufacturers of har- 
nesses, trunks, valises, and similar goods, 
in which they did a successful business for 
seven years. At the end of that time he sold 
his interest, and rented a farm in Madison 
County for a year. During the next tw'o years 
he was employed as clerk in a store, after 
which he formed a copartnership with Henry 
Vaughn, under the style of Vaughn & Co., 
and started a livery business. They had con- 
ducted for a year when they became associated 
with Horace White, the patentee of a leather- 
splitting machine, and carried on that busi- 
ness for a year. Mr. Durfee then became a 
clerk in a wholesale and retail liquor estab- 
lishment, of which, three years after, he took 
full charge. Having filled this position for a 
year, the next three years were spent in buying 
and selling stores and other property. After 
that he went to Muscatine, la., and worked 
for a brother in the jewelry business for a 
year. In 1866 he returned P3ast and [jur- 
chased a farm in Millville, where for two 
years he was engaged in general farming. 
On leaving there he purchased the property 
situated at the corner of High and Oak 
Streets, which he still owns, and where for 



2 I 2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



sixteen years he successfully conducted a 
general store. Since then he has lived in 
practical retirement. 

In 1870 Mr. Durfee was married to Miss 
Mary E. Rush, a daughter of Thomas Rush, 
of Muscatine, la. They adopted three chil- 
dren, namely: Nora, who is a teacher in the 
public schools; Thomas, now deceased; and, 
in 1891, another boy, named Thomas, now 
ten years old. 



/"CHARLES ERRICKSON WILL- 
I J| lAMS, an extensive strawberry farmer 

^•- " of Heislerville, was born here, 

July 23, 185 I, son of Whitefield B. and Mary 
(Blackson) Williams. His great-great-grand- 
father, John Williams, with his wife, came 
from Holland to this country, and settled in 
North Carolina; and his great-grandfather. 
Barlow Williams, was born either in Holland 
or on the ocean during the voyage to Amer- 
ica. His grandfather, Whitefield Williams, 
who was born in 1782, and died at the age of 
thirty-four, married Khoda Riggins and reared 
the following children: Mehitable, born in 
1808; Rhoda L., born in 18 10; Lorania, born 
in 1812; and Whitefield Barlow, the father of 
the subject of this sketch. 

Whitefield 15. Williams, born in Heisler- 
ville in 1814, was educated in the schools of 
his native town. lie shipped as a sailor when 
a boy, and spent much of his time on the 
waters near home until of age. Then, in- 
heriting from his father the farm now tilled 
by his son, he engaged in raising garden prod- 



uce, making a specialty of sweet potatoes. 
He planted from five to seven acres with sweet 
potatoes alone, which he sold in Philadelphia 
and New York; and he kept from five to ten 
head of cattle. Mis death occurred July 20, 
1872, at the age of fifty-eight years. In 1844 
he was married to Marv, daughter of Moses and 
Tabitha (Peterson) Blackson, of Heislerville. 
He and his wife were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Six children were 
born to them, five of whom attained maturity, 
namely: Samuel B., who was lost at sea in 
1870; Charles E., the subject of this sketch; 
Whitefield B. , of whom there is no special 
record ; Rhoda, the wife of John Wesley Cox, 
of Pleasantville, N.J.; and John Ii., of I'ort 
Norris, N.J. Their second child, Loiania, 
died at the age of seven years. 

Charles tlrrickson Williams recei\'ed his 
education in the common school of his native 
town. Beginning in boyhood to take part in 
the farm work, he settled permanently on the 
home farm on attaining man's estate. He 
plants four acres of strawberries, and raises 
some fine fruit. ]>elieving in [xitronizing 
home industry, he hires native pickers for his 
strawberry crop. On October 31, 1874, Mr. 
Williams was married to Sally B., daughter 
of John Chance, of Delmont, this county; and 
he has two children — Samuel B. and Thomas 
!'. At this writing Samuel B. is attending 
Pennington Seminary, preparatory to entering 
Temple College, Philadelphia; and Thomas P. 
is attending the common schools of Heisler- 
ville. The father is a member of Leesburg 
Council, No. 84, Junior Order of United 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



213 



American Mechanics. Both he and Mrs. 
Williams are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, Mr. Williams having the further 
relation vyith it of steward. Worthy repre- 
sentatives of old native families, they are well 
known in the locality and highly esteemed. 




)KVI D. JOHNSON, of Vineland, a 
well-known manager of photograph 
and art rooms in both N'ineland and 
Millville, was born January 19, 1832, in 
Bridgewater, Grafton County, N. H., son of 
Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Sleeper) Johnson. 
His grandfather was Jeremiah Johnson, Sr. 
Jeremiah Johnson, Jr., who was a native of. 
lvi)ping, N.II., when quite young went to 
Bridgewater, where he spent the rest of his 
life in farming. He was a representative 
man of the town, which he served as Collector 
for a number of years. He married Elizabeth 
Sleeper, a daughter of Daniel Sleeper, of 
15ristol, N.H., born July ig, 1805. She bore 
him seven children, all of whom grew up. 
They were: Levi D., the subject of this 
sketch; John E., of Everett, Mass.; Daniel 
S., who died in Bridgewater; Warren M., of 
Arizona; Leroy S., of Maiden, Mass.; Charles 
W., of Boston; Mary Ann, who became Mrs. 
Fisher, of Boston, and is now deceased. The 
father by a former marriage had two children 
— Malinda M. and Elizabeth O. He died in 
1873, at the age of seventy-four. The mother 
of Levi D. died in 1893. ]5oth were es- 
teemed members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



Levi D. Johnson, after attending the pub- 
lic schools of his native town for the usual 
period, went to the New Hampshire Confer- 
ence Seminary at Tilton. On reaching the 
age of twenty he learned the old daguerrotype 
business at Plymouth, N.H., in connection 
with which he afterward travelled for some 
years. He subsequently taught school for some 
time in his native State, successively held the 
offices of Township Clerk and superintendent 
of schools in Bridgewater, and later was su- 
perintendent of schools of Bristol. In 1868 
Mr. Johnson came to Vineland, where he has 
since resided. He has the reputation of being 
one of the most experienced men in his line of 
business. The Millville studio was opened 
more recently. From 1880 to 1883 he was 
Township Clerk for Landis; and from 1891 to 
1895 he served on the School Board, being 
also District Clerk during two years of that 
time. Mr. Johnson was elected Borough As- 
sessor in 1893 for three years. The Federal 
government appointeil him Census Enumerator 
in 1890. In politics he has always been found 
in the Republican ranks, and he has been a 
delegate to different conventions. In Novem- 
ber, 1857, he was received into the Masonic 
Order. He helped in 1865 to organize the 
Bristol Lodge, of whicii he was the first Sec- 
retary until his removal to Vineland. He is 
Past Master of the Vineland Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M., No. 69, and a member of Eureka 
Chapter, No. 18. At present he is serving as 
Deputy Grand Master for the Twelfth Masonic 
District. 

Mr. Johnson was twice married, on the first 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



occasion to Miss Ellen C. Rollins, daughter 
of Colonel Samuel H. Rollins. She died in 
1864, at the age of twenty-four, leaving one 
child, Nellie, now the wife of Frank Dolloff, 
of Bristol. His second marriage- was con- 
tracted August 3, 1865, with Mrs. Abbie J. 
Hanchett, a widow with one child, Edith, who 
lives at home. Mrs. Johnson's maiden name 
was Collier; and she was a native of Pitts- 
field, N.H., born February 15, 1842. By Mr. 
Johnson she has had one child, Alice R. , who, 
born June 21, 1876, was graduated from the 
Vineland High School, and subsequently be- 
came a teacher in the manual training de- 
partment of that institution. Mr. Johnson 
recently bought a house on the corner of Plum 
and Seventh Streets. 




RICK COBB LORE, an enterprising 
and prosperous agriculturist and a 
respected citizen of Newport, Cum- 
berland County, N.J., was born in this town, 
July 12, 1841, being a son of John and Rhoda 
C. (Shaw) Lore. 

His father was a native of Dividing Creek, 
Cumberland County. He there received his 
intellectual equipment for life's duties and re- 
sponsibilities in the common schools, and he 
was subsequently engaged until he became of 
age in the work of the home farm. After his 
marriage he operated on shares the farm of his 
father-in-law, Mr. Shaw, and at the decease 
of the latter he inherited the estate. He then 
conducted thereon general agricultural pur- 
suits until about 1870, when he retired from 



active life. He was united in marriage with 
Mrs. Rhoda C. Smith, a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Shaw, of Newport. She was the 
widow of Samuel Smith, of Newport, by 
whom she had two children, namely: Henry, 
who now resides at Tupper's Plains, Meigs 
County, Ohio ; and Pleasant, who is the 
widow of James Gandy, late of Newport, N.J. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Lore had eight children, 
namely: Elizabeth, who is the wife of Joseph 
Bradford, of Newport; Charles S. ; Arick 
Cobb; Joseph, who at the time of the Civil 
War enlisted in Company F of the Si.xth 
Regiment of New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
and met his death in the service of his coun- 
try at the battle of Williamsburg,, Va. ; John; 
Ann Eliza, who is now the widow of George 
Lockwood, formerly of Paulsboro, N.J.; 
Harvey; and Martha, who resides at Newport 
as the wife of Evan O. Compton. Socially, 
Mr. John Lore, when he was a young man, 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
F"ellows. He never very actively participated 
in politics, though he regularly exercised the 
right of suffrage, and usually lent his support 
to the Democratic ticket. In religious faith 
and fellowship both he and his wife were 
members of the Baptist Church of Newport. 

Arick Cobb Lore obtained his education in 
the common schools of his native place. He 
passed his early manhood at home on the pa- 
ternal farm until his father rented the estate 
of his maternal grandfather: and he was then 
engaged for a year or two as a farm hand, 
being employed by the month. Soon after 
his marriage, in 1861, he purchased a farm, 




ARICK C. LORE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RF,VIKW 



2 17 



which he conducted about four years, when he 
disposed of it, though he rented it of the new 
proprietor for the two succeeding years. 
About 1876 he purchased a portion of his 
present property, having since added to the 
original until now he possesses one hundred 
and eight and a half acres of land, constituting 
one of the finest farms in the vicinity. He 
keeps it all in a state of cultivation, raising 
as the principal crop sweet corn ; but he de- 
votes about six acres to the culture of straw- 
berries, and in the berry season he employs 
from fifteen to twenty pickers, who mostly 
come from a distance. He cuts yearly a crop 
of between fifty and seventy-five tons of hay, 
and keeps four horses and ten or twelve head 
of cattle. He sells quite a large quantity of 
milk, the jiroduct of his dairy. 

In December, 1861, Mr. Lore was joined 
in matrimony with Miss Eleanor, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. David Osborn, of Alloway, 
in Salem County. Eight children have been 
born to them, namely: Joseph, who is now 
engaged in the oyster business at Solomon 
Island, Md. ; James, who is a resident of 
Newport; George, also in Newport; John T., 
who also conducts the oyster business at Solo- 
mon Island; Elaminda, who is the wife of 
Hammond Davis, of DeerfieUl ; Rhoda; Arick 
C, Jr. ; and Milton. 

Mr. Lore is actively identified with both 
the civic and social life of the community. 
In response to the solicitation of his fellows 
he has served them in the capacity of Sur- 
veyor of tiie Iligliw.iy for several terms, and 
also in the position of Road Overseer. So- 



cially, he fraternizes with the Order of 
Knights of Pythias, being a member of Morn- 
ing Light Lodge of Newport, of which he is 
Past Chancellor. He is also connected with 
the tribe of the Improved Order of Red Men 
located at Bridgeton, and likewise with a local 
beneficial society at Newport. In the begin- 
ning of the Civil War he was employed by the 
government for three months on the Susque- 
hanna River in training mules. After suffi- 
cient training the animals were shipped to 
I'ortress Monroe, whence they were distrib- 
uted wherever needed on the field. Mr. Lore 
also served in the regular army for two 
months under General Smith. In national 
politics he is found in the ranks of the Demo- 
cratic party, the principles and candidates of 
which camp he generally supports with his 
ballot. Religiously, he regularly attends and 
supports the Baptist Church of Newport, of 
which his wife is a member. 



Yk7%01^ERT L. LAKE, of Port Norris, 
I r\ Notary Public, Commissioner of 
^-^ Deeds, and an enterprising dealer 
in gentlemen's furnishing goods, was born in 
this town, March 29, 1865, son of Samuel 
and Mary (Robbins) Lake. Mr. Lake's 
grandfather, Henry Lake, was one of the early 
residents and thriving farmers of the place 
formerly called Downs township, where his 
son Samuel was born. 

Samuel Lake at an early age was engaged 
in carrying freight by water along the coast. 
He was afterward one of the first in this vicin- 



2l8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ity to take to oyster fishing. When he started 
in that industry he was but sixteen years old, 
and at seventeen he had charge of a boat. A 
year later he purchased a boat and outfit for 
his own use, and thereafter became very 
prosperous. He subsequently owned several 
schooners, and personally superintended the 
business when oysters were carried by water 
to the Philadelphia market. After having 
been actively engaged in the industry for fifty 
years he retired, but retained its general man- 
agement until his death, which occurred June 
1 8, 1894. Although his wealth was acquired 
by arduous labor, a shade of parsimony never 
appeared to mar his generous disposition. 
His family has had an elegant home from the 
time when his means first enabled him to fur- 
nish it, and he subsequently took pride in 
giving to each of his children a costly and 
substantial residence. He married Mary Rob- 
bins, daughter of David Robbins, a representa- 
tive of one of the oldest and most prominent 
families of Port Norris. She had by him four 
children, as follows: Myra H., the wife of 
Theophilus Newcomb, of this town; David 
R., of whom there is no special record; 
Robert L., the subject of this sketch; and 
Daniel L., who died in 1874. The mother 
died in October, 1884. Both jjarents were 
members of the Baptist church. The father 
was Treasurer of the Building Committee ap- 
pointed to superintend the erection of the new 
church edifice. 

Robert L. Lake began his school life in 
Port Norris, and completed his studies at the 
South Jersey Institute in Bridgeton. He 



then entered the oyster business with his 
father, beginning as a common assistant on 
the schooners, and later becoming associated 
with E. Brown in Bridgeton. In 1893 he 
bought the business in Port Norris formerly 
carried on by B. F. Sharp, now of Bridgeton; 
and he conducts the only store in town devoted 
exclusively to boots, shoes, and gentlemen's 
furnishing goods. The stand is in the Knights 
of Pythias Block, which is situated at the 
junction of two busy thoroughfares in the cen- 
tre of the town. He is already very popular, 
and the large patronage he has so far acquired 
is still increasing. He is also ticket agent 
of the West Jersey & Seashore Railroad 
and agent of the West Jersey Express Com- 
pany. When a boy his father gave him a 
small printing-press, in which he took great 
interest. As the result of his early liking 
for the "art preservative" industry, he is now 
the proprietor of the only job-printing busi- 
ness in Port Norris. What spare time may 
be left him by these occupations is filled by 
his duties as Notary Public and Commissioner 
of Deeds. In politics he always acts with the 
Republican party, and has been frequently 
chosen delegate to the party conventions. 

On January 51, 18S5, Mr. Lake wedded 
Myrtle L. Campbell, of Newport, N.J. For 
four years he was Master of Finance of the 
Knights of Pythias Lodge. He is at present 
Keeper of Wampum of Idaho Tribe, No. 51, 
Improved Order of Red Men, and is also 
connected with the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle. He is a member of the Baptist 
church, while Mrs. Lake is a Methodist. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



219 



They occupy a handsome residence, opposite 
the Baptist church, erected for Mr. Lake by 
his father. 




'I-IANK H. WALLS, D.D.S., one of 
J the most e.xpcriencetl dentists of Vine- 
lantl, was born September 15, ICS53, in Ells- 
worth, Me., son of Simeon M. and Ann 
(Burke) Walls. Simeon Walls, who was 
born in Mount Desert, Me., in 1821, moved 
to Vineland in 1864, where he resided for the 
rest of his life. The captain of a merchant- 
man, he made several voyages from Philadel- 
phia to Mediterranean ports. He retired a 
short time previous to his death, which oc- 
curred August 12, 1 87 1, the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of his birth. He married Miss Burke, of 
Charlestown, ^Llss. ; and they had five chil- 
dren, of whom Simeon is deceased. The 
others are: Mary, who married Captain 
George B. Swain; Winslow W., who lives in 
Vineland; Frank IL, the subject of this 
sketch; and Alonzo H., who also lives in 
Vineland. The mother died on December 31, 
1894. She and her husband were respected 
members of the Baptist church. 

I"" rank H. Walls, D.D.S., was educated in 
the iHiblic schools of Vineland. Then engag- 
ing with Wiswell & Co., of this place, he 
learned the shoe-cutting trade, which he fol- 
lowed for ten years. In 18S2 he began to 
study dentistry in the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, and graduated therefrom in 1884. He 
then entered upon his profession in this city, 
where he has since acquired a large practice 
by his skill and up-to-date methods. He was 



one of the organizers of the Tradesman's 
Bank, and has since been one of its Di- 
rectors. Dr. Walls served in the Borough 
Council three years, being elected on the Re- 
publican ticket. The Board of Education 
were benefited by his zeal for the welfare of 
the schools for eight years, during two of 
which he was President of the Board. Me is 
a member of the Royal Arcanum, also of 
the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and Chosen 
Friends Society. Since the organization of 
the Board of Trade he has served it as Sec- 
retary, and was instrumental in bringing here 
several large industries. 

On October 7, 1878, Dr. Walls was riiarried 
to Lizzie Gould, daughter of Solon S. Gould. 
They have five children — Harry G. , Lizzie 
M., Herbert A., Raymond M., and Roscoe A. 
Walls. Both parents are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. The family 
make their home in the handsome residence, 
built in 189s, at 25 Myrtle Avenue. 



^^•^» 




^rill'ENRY REEVES, Jr., the proprietor 
ol a large general store and bakery 
in Leesburg, was born November 
24, 1857, in Manumuskin, N.J., son of Henry 
and Mary J. (Lee) Reeves. Mr. Reeves's 
grandfather, I^enjamin Franklin Reeves, a 
native of Burlington County, settled in Man- 
umuskin, where he became an extensive 
mill-owner, and was for many years a prom- 
inent business man of that locality. 

Henry Reeves, Sr., Mr. Reeves's father, was 
born in Manumuskin, April 5, 1824. After 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



finishing with school he began to work in his 
father's grist-mill. Later he became proprie- 
tor of a saw-mill that had also been the prop- 
erty of his father. Here he manufactured and 
dealt in all kinds of lumber, and had the larg- 
est business of its kind in Manumuskin for 
several years. hi October, 1S76, he sold the 
mill property, and, going to Philadelphia, 
conducted a restaurant for the succeeding four 
years. He then sold his restaurant, returned 
to Manumuskin, settled upon a farm which he 
owned there, and has since devoted his atten- 
tion to general farming and the shipping of 
eggs. His wife, Mary J., a daughter of John 
Lee, of Tuckahoe, Cape May County, has 
been the mother of four children, three of 
whom are living, namely: Samuel V., a resi- 
dent of Haddonfield, Camden County; Ida, 
the wife of George W. Stevens, of Manumus- 
kin; and Henry, Jr., the subject of this 
sketch. Both parents are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Henry Reeves, Jr., was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, and when of 
sufficient age he began to assist his father in 
the mill. After the business was sold he was 
employed at another mill in the neighborhood 
for some years. He residetl in Manumuskin 
until icS84, when he came to Leesburg, where 
he estai)lished the first livery stable in the 
town. Possessing one horse minus a harness, 
with which to start business, he rented the 
place of Dr. Daniel G. Carlisle. Obtaining 
some credit upon the strength of previous 
transactions, he secured a small equipment, 
which was increased as his business devel- 



oped. Soon after he had a flourishing busi- 
ness. He carried it on for four years, and 
then sold out. After managing his brother's 
store in Haddonfield for one winter, he re- 
turned to Leesburg, and established himself 
in the stove and hardware business in his 
present store, which was erected by him about 
that time. Pie carries a large and varied 
stock of general merchandise, exclusive of 
groceries and dry goods. In 1895 he erected 
a bakery, the first establishment of its kind in 
this vicinity. Both ventures are prospering, 
and have a large and profitable trade. He 
employs two experienced bakers, and runs two 
teams, one as far north as Port Elizabeth, and 
the other south to Dennisville and Port 
Norris. His energy and enterprise are fully 
appreciated by the people of this and the sur- 
rounding towns. He was for several years 
Postmaster of Leesburg, and has been Town- 
ship Assessor since 1891. 

In September, 1880, Mr. Reeves was 
united in marriage to Hannah Hoffman, 
daughter of Ervin Hoffman, of Leesburg. 
Mrs. Reeves has had five children, three of 
whom are living; namely, Lydia II., Adclia 
F., and Winnie W. Mr. Ree\'es is con- 
nected with Leesburg Lodge, No. 87, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows; Leesburg 
Council, No. 84, Junior Order of Unitetl 
American Meciianics; and Washington Camp, 
No. 13, Patriotic .Sons of America, of Del- 
mont. Both as a business man and a citizen 
he occupies a leading position hei'e, and his 
success is the outcome of his own ability 
and perseverance. Mr. and Mrs. Reeves are 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



22 I 



nicmljcrs of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
vvliicli they liberally supijort. 



(^OSIAH HAMMOND TICK, an enter- 
prising general farmer and truck 
gardener of Commercial township, was 
born in Williamstown, Camden County, Sep- 
tember 39, 1847, son of Josiah Hammond, 
Sr. , and Elizabeth (Newcomb) Tice. His 
father, who was born in Millville, this county, 
about the year 18 15, was a glass cutter by 
trade, and ])ursued his calling for some years 
in Shutterville, a suburb of Millville. He 
afterward moved to Winslow, and thence to 
Williamstown, where he kept a general store, 
and dealt in lumber until his death, which 
t)ccurred in 1847. His wife, Elizabeth, whom 
he married in 1839, was born in Millville in 
1808, daughter of Isaac and Hannah (Dia- 
mond) Newcomb. Her parents, who were 
prosperous farming jjeople, reared seven other 
children; namely, ]5ethsheba, Mary, James, 
Ephraim, John, Isaac, and Helen. Both 
father and mother were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Josiah H. Tice, Sr., 
and his wife had four children, three of whom 
grew up, namely: Sophia C, the wife of 
Thomas Campbell, of Williamstown; Amelia, 
the widow of the late Archibald Cam]jbell; 
and Josiah H., the subject of this sketch. 
The mother subsequently wedded James Camp- 
bell, and by him had two children -- Hannah 
Jane and Cornelius, both of whom attained ma- 
turity. Mrs. Campbell, who is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, is still living. 



Josiah Hammond Tice acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of the different 
places where his step-father resided, and sub- 
sequently learned the shoemaker's trade. In 
August, 1864, he enlisted as a private in 
Company E, Third Regiment, New Jersey 
V^olunteer Cavalry, witli which he serveil until 
the close of the Civil War. He was with 
his company in the front rank throughout the 
formalities attending General Lee's surrender 
at Appomattox. Just previous to his return 
home he sustained a severe injury in his foot 
that caused him considerable inconvenience at 
the time, and from which he has never full\- 
recovered. After the war he and John Kirby, 
forming the firm of Kirby & Tice, carried on 
a thriving custom and retail trade in the boot 
and shoe business, having two stores, one in 
Williamstown and the other in Clayton, 
Gloucester County. In 1869 the partnership 
was dissolved, Mr. Tice becoming sole propri- 
etor of the Clayton store. This he conducted 
until 1 87 1, when he sold out, and bought a 
part of his present farm of five hundred acres 
in Commercial township, where he has since 
resided. He has about two hundred acres of 
land under cultivation. Ten acres are de- 
voted to strawberries, of which he raises annu- 
ally and ships to Boston and I'rovidence, R.I., 
twenty tliousand quarts. He has a peach 
orchard of eighteen acres, five acres planted 
with blackberries, and thirty-five acres with 
cranberries. He also raises watermelons, 
wheat, rye, corn, oats, and other products, 
besides turkeys and other fowl. He is inter- 
ested to a considerable e.xtcnt in the real es- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tatc business, buying and selling timber land; 
and during the year 1895 he cut five hundred 
cords of wood and three thousand piles, which 
were sold in Philadelphia and Camden. 

Mr. Ticc has been twice married. On De- 
cember 31, 1 868, he wedded Letitia Emma, 
daughter of Andrew Long, of Williamstown. 
By this union there were nine children, seven 
of whom reached maturity. These are: 
Amelia, the wife of Frank Ferguson, of Mill- 
ville; Josiah Hammond (third) ; Andrew Her- 
bert; John Oscar; Francis Stanton; Rose 
Emma; and Goodwin. The mother died in 
September, 1883. The second marriage of 
Mr. Tice was contractcti September 10, 1884, 
with Mrs. Abigail B. (Tullis) Trout, daugh- 
ter of Eli and Eunice (Lake) Tullis, of 
Drakestovvn. She has three children by her 
former marriage; namely, Lawrence Trout, 
Matilda, and Martha. Matilda is the wife of 
Richard Buckaloo, of Port Norris, this county; 
and Martha is the wife of John Grace, of New- 
port, also this county. Mr. and Mrs. Tice 
attend the Baptist church. 



\\(:A)/ ILLIAM BURBANK BARNES, 
VpV^ car|ienter and building mover of 
Vineland, is accounted a successful and able 
man in his sjiecial line of work. He was 
l)orn in Weymouth, Mass., March 10, 185 1, 
son of Robert Vinal and lilizabeth (Burbank) 
Barnes. Robert Vinal Barnes, who is a na- 
tive of Hingham, Mass., born December 24, 
1820, received a good common-school educa- 
tion. When a young man he worked aboard 



a sailing-vessel, engaged in coast trading. 
Later he purchased a farm in Weymouth, con- 
taining between two and three hundred acres, 
where he kept a large dairy, and was quite 
extensively engaged in farm gardening. Sev- 
eral years ago he sold that i^lace, and pur- 
chased a farm of twenty-five acres. He 
subsequently sold this estate also, and then 
purchased the place containing between two 
and three acres, on which he now lives. 
Among the town offices in which he has served 
are those of Selectman and School Trustee. 
He is a member of the Good Templars. His 
marriage with Miss Elizabeth Burbank in 
1844 resulted in the birth of nine children, of 
whom Robert Bruce, Isaac Burr, David Beales, 
William ]5urbank, Sarah, Ouincy Tufts, 
Susie, and Herbert , Franklin are living. 
Sarah is the wife of Frank Young, of Ouincy, 
Mass.; and Susie is the witlow of William 
Rich. The parents are members of the Con- 
gregational church. 

William Ikirbank Barnes received his edu- 
cation in the district school. Wiien si.Kteon 
years of age he went to work in a shoe factor)'. 
After remaining there between two and three 
years, he left to accept a position in a bo.K 
factory. Here he worked for the three ensu- 
ing years, and then began to learn the trade 
of a carpenter. In 1873 he came to Vineland, 
finished his apprenticeshi]i, and worked for 
two months as a joLtrneyman. He went to 
Ohio in 1875, and for three months was em- 
ployed in the cities of Cleveland and Paines- 
ville. Going then to Port Huron, Mich., he 
secured a position in a sash and blind factory, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



223 



in which he worked up to 1877. After that 
he went to I'etrolia, Canada, where he was 
employed in a sash and blind factory for a 
year. He was next employed in a saw and 
planing mill of Verona, Mich. Three years 
later he returned to Port Huron, where he 
worked as a journeyman carpenter during the 
three succeeding years. From Port Huron he 
came back to Vineland, and, after carrying on 
business as a contractor and builder for about 
a year, he added that of building mover. A 
large number of fine residences in this city 
were erected by him. He has been engaged 
in building moving in various places through- 
out Southern New Jersey, where he has made 
a reputation as a very successful and com- 
petent man in that line of work. 

On April 10, 1873, he was joined in mar- 
riage with Miss Alice Foster, and has since 
become the father of five children, of whom 
four are living — George Otis, Randall, 
Jerretter A., and Oscar. Mr. Barnes is a 
member of Vineland Castle, Knights of the 
Golden P3agle, and is one of the e.\emi)t fire- 
men. At one time he was assistant foreman 
of the fire company. He and Mrs Barnes 
are attendants and supporters of the Sweden- 
borgian church. 



V^^fUAAAM HENRY KNOLL, a well- 
V^ Vi known farmer and fruit grower of 
Landis township, was born July 18, 1858, in 
VValheim, Wiirtemberg, Germany, son of M. 
Gottleib and Christiana (Sieber) Knoll. M. 
Gottleib Knoll, also a native of VValheim, 



born February 7, 1830, was educated in the 
public schools of his native town. After the 
close of his school life he assisted his father 
in the work of the farm for seven years. Then 
he engaged in general agriculture on his own 
account. He gave special attention to the 
culture of grapes, and in time had quite an 
extensive vineyard. In 1884, however, he 
migrated to this country, and, settling at 
Landis, purchased the estate which is now 
the property of his son William H. Here 
until the spring of 1890 he raised almost ex- 
clusively fruit and sweet potatoes, and then 
returned to VValheim, in his native land, where 
he still resides. In 1857 he was united in 
marriage with Miss Christiana Sieber, by 
whom he became the father of five children — 
William Henry, Regina, Christiana, Gottleib, 
and Katherina. Regina is now the wife of 
Gustav Faul, a resident of Monroeville, N.J.; 
Christiana is deceased; and Katherina, who 
resides in Philadelphia, Pa., is the wife of 
Frederick Sckweichcr. Both parents when 
in this country were members of the German 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Vineland. 
The mother, who was born in September, 
1828, passed away in Landis, June 19, 1885, 
in her fifty-seventh year. 

William Henry Knoll ac(|uired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his native 
town. At the com]:)letion of his schooling he 
found employment on the paternal farm until 
his twenty-fourth year, when he crossed, the 
Atlantic, and fixed his residence in Landis. 
He there worked on a farm until 1884, when 
he transferred his services to his father's farm 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in Landis. On his father's return to Ger- 
many he purchased the property, where he has 
since been successfully engaged in the culture 
of sweet potatoes, blackberries, and straw- 
berries. 

On February 2, 1886, Mr. Knoll was joined 
in matrimony with Miss Ida K., a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. George Muhleisen, of Vineland, 
N.J.; and he has since become the father of 
four children — George G., William Henry, 
Jr., Charles G., and Matilda Bertha. 

He is a member of the Farmers" Alliance of 
Landis. He belongs to the German RTeth- 
odist Episcopal Church of Landis, in the work 
of which he has been very actively engaged. 
He has served in the capacity of Sabbath- 
school treasurer, and he has also officiated as 
President of the Board of Trustees. 



-pNFNJAMIN F. HARDING, Superin- 
I ^^^\ tendent and Treasurer of the Bridge- 
ton Gas Light Company, was born 
in Glassboro, Gloucester County, N.J., Oc- 
tober 14, 1838, son of Benjamin and Mary 
Marshall (Fisler) Harding. Mr. Harding's 
paternal grandfather, Thomas Harding, was 
born in Pitt's Grove township, and there fol- 
lowed farming as an occupation. He and his 
wife, l.ydia Richman, whom he marrieil in 
■795' reared a family of nine children. 

Their son, Benjamin Harding, was born in 
Pitt's Grove township, Salem County, Decem- 
ber 21, 1798. He acquired his education in 
the schools of his native town; and after the 
completion of his elementary studies he i)ur- 



sued a course in surveying, which he prac- 
tised during his entire life in connection with 
farming. After his marriage he settled upon 
a farm in Red Lion, now Hardingville, where 
he remained for four years. In 1S27 he re- 
moved to Malaga, where he took charge of the 
store carried on by the glass company. He 
resided there for ten years, during which time, 
in connection with his other affairs, he was 
engaged as a surveyor. Removing to Glass- 
boro in 1837, he continued in mercantile pur- 
suits for four years; and at the end of that 
time he went to Fislerville, now Clayton, 
where he carried on the farm belonging to his 
wife's father, being thus occupied until his 
death, which took place April 4, 1880. He 
was a Whig in politics, and was active in 
public affairs. During his residence in Mal- 
aga he was Assessor of Franklin township, 
and he was also Postmaster of Malaga for sev- 
eral years. In 1827 he served on the Town- 
ship Committee, and in 1834 'i^ was Town 
Clerk of Franklin. He was Township Asses- 
sor in 1 83 1 and 1832, and from 1835 to 1S38. 
He ably represented Gloucester County in the 
General Assembly in 1843, 'I"'' 'i*^ ^^''is ''e- 
elected twice. It was during his first term that 
the constitution of New Jersey was changed. 
Benjamin Harding acted as Justice of the 
Peace during the greater portion of his active 
period. His wife, Mary Marshall P'isler, 
whom he married in January, 1823, was a 
daughter of Leonard Fisler, of Fislerville, 
who was a soldier in the War of 18 12. She 
became the mother of seven chihlren, five of 
whom lived to reach maturity. They were as 




BENJAMIN F. HARDING. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



follows: Annie F. ; Lydia M. ; Hannah H., 
wife of Thomas Stanger, of the firm of War- 
wick & Stanger, of Glassboro; John, who died 
in infancy; Leonard F. ; Thomas Whitney, 
wlio tlicd at the age of nine years; and Ben- 
jamin F. , the subject of this sketch. Mr. 
Harding's parents were members of the Pres- 
byterian church, of which his father was an 
Elder. 

Benjamin F. Harding commenced his edu- 
cation in the public schools and finished his 
studies at the West Jersey Academy. After 
leaving school he remained at home until 
reaching the age of thirty-five, looking after 
the farm, and managing a saw-mill from 1866 
to 1873. During this time he acted as agent 
for the Cumberland Mutual I'^ire Insurance 
Company, and transacted a large amount of 
business in that direction. He then accepted 
the general management of the Bridgeton Gas 
Company, a position which he still holds, his 
able direction of its affairs having given com- 
plete satisfaction. Since coming to Bridge- 
ton he has figured prominently in public 
affairs, having been elected in i<SS6 to repre- 
sent Ward 4 in the Common Council for two 
years, and in 1888 re-elected for three years. 
He served with Ability on the Committees 
ujjon Water, Finance, Ordinance, anil Print- 
ing, and was President of the Council in the 
last year of his service. 

On May 14, 1867, Mr. Harding was united 
in marriage with Harriet L. Lawrence, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Samuel Lawrence, of Lewis- 
ton, Pa. Three children have been born to 
them, as follows: Samuel Lawrence, who is a 



student at Rutgers College; Mary Marshall, 
who attends Ivy Hall School; and Benjamin 
N. The family are members of the Second 
Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. Harding is 

an Polder anil superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. 




bkni:zi:r c. Henderson, a weii- 

known and highly esteemed resident of 
Delmont, was born in Newport, Cumberland 
County, June 11, 1838. Pie is a son of James 
and Margaret (P'ilbert) Henderson, and comes 
of an old family. His earliest ancestor in 
this country was his grandfather, Nathan 
Henderson. Nathan married, and reared a 
family of four children — Nancy, Sarah, Na- 
than, and James. James Henderson, who was 
also a native of Newport, married Margaret 
Filbert, of Newport, who bore him two chil- 
dren, of whom Ebcnezer C. attained maturity. 
Ebenezer C. Henderson received his educa- 
tion in the common schools. As soon as his 
school days ended he went to sea; and he 
sailed many years on coasting-vessels, visiting 
most of the ports on the Atlantic coast. 
Subsequently he was engaged for some time 
in the oyster business, which, though it kept 
him on the water, did not take him far from 
the vicinity of his home. In i S92 he settled 
permanently on term Jiniia at Delmont, and 
has been since engaged in farming. He 
raises corn, potatoes, and strawberries. He 
makes a specialty of strawberries, with which 
he has planted three acres. He takes pleasure 
in developing the berries, and has lU'oduced 
some of the finest fruit in the market. 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Henderson was married August 17, 
1863, to Emma C, daughter of Charles W. 
and Amanda W. (McKaig) Corson. Charles 
VV. Corson was born in Delmont, July 29, 
1S23. He, too, followed the sea for several 
years, until his marriage, when he settled on 
a farm, and has since been engaged in the 
pursuit of agriculture. He was married Sep- 
tember 13, 1846, to Miss McKaig, and reared 
three children, namely: Emma C, now Mrs. 
Henderson; William Henry, deceased; and 
Lucy lu Mr. and Mrs. Corson are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. 
Henderson and his wife have two children — 
Sally M. and Clementine G. Clementine G. 
Henderson was married January 27, 18S5, to 
Captain William Linwood Foster, a native of 
Cape May Court-house, Cape May County, 
who was born November i, 1863, son of W'ill- 
iam H. and Hannah (Patent) Foster. He is 
a carpenter by trade, and works at building 
when not engaged in the oyster business, in 
which he has been interested since early 
youth. He was made captain of a boat in 
1892, and owns an interest in the vessel. 
Captain Foster is a Republican, and has 
served on the Election Board of Delmont. 
He belongs to the Delmont branch of the 
Order of Patriotic Sons of America and to 
Maurice River Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 
Of his two children Charles died when six 
years old. The other, Ebenezer Henderson, 
so named after his grandfather, is living. 
Both parents are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and the father is superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. Mr. and Mrs. 



Henderson are also members of that church; 
and Mr. Henderson, like his son-in-law, is 
affiliated with the Patriotic Sons of America. 




n>M ENRY S. ROBBINS, of Port Norris, 
the largest oyster planter in this sec- 
tion of South Jersey, was born Sep- 
tember 18, 1846, son of Richard and Anna 
Maria (Hines) Robbins. He is of English 
extraction, his grandfather, David Robbins, 
who was a farmer, having been a native of the 
mother country. David Robbins was one of 
the early settlers at Port Norris and one of 
the members of the pioneer Baptist church at 
Dividing Creek. 

Richard Robbins, son of David, was born 
in Port Norris, near the village, January 22, 
1817, and here grew to manhood. Having ac- 
quired a good education, he taught school in 
the village for two years, in the mean time 
working also at farming on the homestead. 
This estate he inherited on the death of his 
father; and he was very successful as a farmer 
and stock raiser, gradually increasing his real 
estate until it comprised tlnxe hunelred acres. 
He was one of the first to see the opportuni- 
ties in the oyster business, and gathered one 
season's crop before any jilanting was done; 
and, wliile active in oyster gathering only a 
single year, he owned shares in three boats, 
and in that way derived some income from 
this new industry. A keen and intelligent 
business man, he was highly esteemed in 
financial circles and actively interested in 
many leading enterprises. He was connected 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



with the Cumberland Bank of Bridgeton, 
antl was instrumental in connecting Port Nor- 
ris with the Cumberland & Maurice River 
Railroad, the first railroad to touch this 
place. 

In politics he was at first a Whig and later 
a Republican, and, though one of the strong- 
est citizens of the place, was not an office- 
seeker. He died December 17, 1S90, at the 
age of seventy-four. His wife, Mrs. Anna 
M. Robbins, who was born in iSiS, and died 
April 25, 1S96, was a daughter of Joseph 
Hines, one of the early settlers of Newport, 
N.J., and a member of a prominent family of 
that place. She was a member of the Baptist 
church at Port Norris, which her husband was 
instrumental in founding, and of which he was 
Deacon forty-nine years. He helped to build 
the first and second church edifices, he being 
always the one to suggest plans to raise money 
or to carry out a needed improvement. He 
was on the Board of Trustees for a number of 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Robbins were 
the parents of seven children, namely: Eliza- 
beth, wife of Robert Bateman, of Newport, 
N.J. ; limma, wife of Alphonso Lore; Henry 
S., above named; Rhoda, wife of Peter 
Ladow, of Dividing Creek; I^ydia, wife of 
Charles Whitaker; David and George, both 
residents of Port Norris. 

Henry S. Robbins acquired his education in 
the schools of Port Norris, his native place. 
He engaged in the oyster trade when seven- 
teen years of age, and learned the business 
thoroughly, taking an active part in all the 
work to be done on land and water. Before 



he was of age he had a boat of his own and 
oyster beds planted; and he gradually in- 
creased his trade until he was owner and oper- 
ator of si.\- fine oyster boats, for each of which 
he plants three years in ach'ance. His plant- 
ing ground is extensive, and he has developed 
his business to enormous proportions. At 
present he takes no personal part in the opera- 
tions of planting and gathering oysters, but 
gives much of his time to the direction of the 
trade, which is mostly wholesale, shipping 
more than any other oyster merchant from this 
place. His financial operations are not 
limited to the oyster business alone, for he 
also owns and operates a fine farm in the 
township of Commercial, and is a stockholder 
in the Bridgeton National Bank. 

Mr. Robbins was married June 13, i86g, to 
Miss Mary Jane Hand, daughter of Thomas 
Hand, one of the early and prominent settlers 
at Port Norris. A native of West Creek, Mr. 
Hand spent the greater part of his active life 
in Port Norris, where he kept a store, and was 
also interested in the oyster business. He 
was a large land-owner, and the possessor of a 
number of shares of stock in the Cumberland 
& Maurice River Railroad, of which he was a 
Director. A freeholder of Port Norris for 
twenty years, he did a great deal for the uj)- 
building of the place, and was one of the 
most prominent of the town fathers. He had 
a kindly disposition and generous heart, and 
was widely known as a friend to the poor, con- 
ferring benefits both on the "just and on the 
unjust," for he was too honest himself to sus- 
pect imposition. He and his contemporary, 



230 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mr. Richard Robbins, occupied the same 
social plane in Port Norris, and shared the es- 
teem of the townspeople. Mrs. Robbins was 
born in Port Norris, and has been a lifelong 
resident of the place. She is the mother of 
six children, namely: Clarence, a business 
man of this town, who married Miss Anna 
Hurtz Pepper, and has one child, Helen L. ; 
Hammitt L., captain of an oyster boat; 
Thomas, who commands a boat of his own, 
and also manages one for his father; Wilbert 
H., a cigar manufacturer, who married Miss 
Georgia Terry, and has one son, Henry S. ; 
Maude M., wife of George McConnell, an 
oyster man of this place; and David, who, 
though still attending school, materially helps 
his father in the oyster business. 

Mr. Robbins is an active worker in the in- 
terests of the Republican party, and, though 
not seeking ofifice, has acted as delegate to 
different conventions, and has served a number 
of terms as a member of the County Republi- 
can Committee. He is a member of Morning 
Light Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of Newport, 
with which he has been connected twenty- 
eight years ; a charter member of tlie Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, and also of the 
Order of Knights of the Mystic Chain, of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, and of the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
A liajjtist in religious belief, he is a member 
and strong supporter of the church in this 
town. He has a handsome residence, which 
he erected some twenty -two years ago, fitted 
with all modern conveniences and tastefully 
furnished. 




RANCIS WATHIER, the oldest cigar 
manufacturer of Millville, was born at 
Longvue, France, February 2, I S3 5, son of 
Nicholas and Margaret (Andre) Wathier. 
The father was a general merchant at Longvue, 
where his life was spent. His wife bore him 
nine children, of whom Francis, Charles, and 
John B. came to the United States. Charles 
settled in New Orleans, served in the Mexi- 
can War to its close, was subsequently en- 
gaged in business for several years in New 
Orleans, and finally returned to F"rance, where 
he died. John B. also settled in New Or- 
leans, and, after conducting a successful hotel 
and restaurant business at the corner of 
Franklin and Custom-house Streets for a 
number of years, sold out and returned to 
France. After the close of the war he came 
back to the United States, going this time to 
the West, where he lived in different parts of 
Colorado and New Mexico. He has since 
been to Europe again, and now lives retired 
in Millville. 

Francis Wathier received his education in 
the schools of France. In 1S55 he came to 
America, settling first in Milwaukee, Wis., 
where he soon secured a position as clerk in a 
grocery store. Later he became an interpreter 
for a large company, a position that he was 
well qualified to fill, having learned in France 
to speak German, HoUanci-I'lemish, and ling- 
lish as well as French. The work, however, 
proved too great a tax on his strength, and he 
resigned. He then became the New York 
agent for a man owning a large tract of land 
in Michigan. Mr. Wathier's business was to 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



231 



get emigrants to settle on the land, at which 
he was very successful. Soon after the begin- 
ning of the Civil War, on May 8, 1861, he en- 
listed for general service in the regular 
United States Army. He was placed in the 
artillery, and sent to the Army of the Poto- 
mac to start the first "flying artillery." In 
August, 1 86 1, after that was accomplished, 
he was transferred to the Army of the Poto- 
mac, with which he took part in twenty-two 
different battles, the more important being 
those of Yorktown, Gaines Mill, first and 
Second Hull Run, first and second F"red- 
ericksburg, Antietam, South Mountain, the 
seven days' retreat, and the battle of Gettys- 
burg. At Culpeper, Va., on November 8, 
1863, a portion of his foot was shot off. 
After submitting to field amputation at 
Mayor's farm-house, he was sent to the Co- 
lumbian College Hospital at Washington, 
where, when he had recovered, he acted as 
assistant surgeon until he was honorably dis- 
charged on June 28, 1864. In the service he 
hati belli the ranks of Corporal and Sergeant. 
From Washington he went to Philadelphia, 
where he remained for a time on account of ill 
health. Then he accepted a position in the 
arsenal at Bridesburg, Pa., working there 
until the close of the war, ten months later. 
After this he was engaged in the cigar and 
tobacco manufacturing business, successively 
in Philadelphia and Trenton. From Trenton 
he came to Millville, where he has been for 
the past twenty-five years, and is now the old- 
est cigar and tobacco manufacturer in this 
place. The business, which is confined to 



the manufacture of first-class goods, has ma- 
terially increased since he came here, and 
now he furnishes employment for four or 'five 
people besides his three sons. His was the 
first union shop started in Millville. The 
product from this manufactory is sold at 
wholesale and retail. 

Mr. Wathier married Miss I'auline C. 
Leibig, of Philadelphia, a native of Mount 
Holly, N.J., and has four children — Charles, 
Frank J., Louis, and Amy. He was a mem- 
ber of Union Pest, No. 55, of the Grand 
Army, at the time it consolidated with Tice 
Post, under the name of Sharp Post, No. 2, 
has served in all the chairs, and has been a 
delegate to the State encampment. For 
twenty-two years he has been a member of 
Manumuskin Tribe, No. 13, Improved Order 
of Red Men. Both he and Mrs. Wathier are 
communicants of the Lutheran church. 




EV. JOHN ALLP:N KINGSBURY, 



now living in retirement from active 
life, is one of the most esteemed 
residents of Vineland. He was born in 
Springville, Erie Count)', N.Y., October 6, 
183 1, son of Blodgett George and Sarah 
(Smith) Kingsbury. His grandfather, George 
Kingsbury, whose birth occurred January 23, 
1770, in Poultney, Vt., was a prosperous 
lawyer. 

Blodgett George Kingsbury, also a native of 
Poultney, was born March 13, 1800, and 
was educated in the district school. After 
learning the trades of tanner and shoemaker, 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he, in company with an uncle named Blodgctt, 
started in business on liis own account in 
Western New York. Having been occupied 
in this way for many years, he went to the 
locality in McKean County, Pennsylvania, 
now called Tarport, and for two years engaged 
in lumbering, at the same time that he carried 
on a mercantile business. The next five years 
he spent in Chautauqua County, New York, 
employed in shoemaking. Then he went to 
Springville, where he carried on the shoe 
business for about one year. Subsequently he 
was engaged in the same way for si.x or eight 
years in McHenry County, Illinois, for about 
one year in Madison, N.J., and for two years 
in Chatham, N.J. From Chatham he re- 
moved to River Head, L. I., and there carried 
on a retail boot and shoe store for about three 
years. Having disposed of his store at the 
end of this period, he spent another year in 
visiting relatives in various parts of the coun- 
try, and settled down in Vineland, where he 
died July 6, 1886, at the age of eighty-six 
years. His wife, Sarah, who was a daughter 
of Solomon Smith, of Wyoming, Genesee 
County, N.Y., bore him si.x children, of whom 
the Rev. Mr. Kingsbury is the sole survi- 
vor. Four of the number reached maturity, 
namely: Permelia, who first married John ]}. 
Groger, and afterward Samuel McCray, of 
Woodstock, 111. ; Polly, who was the wife of 
George Tower, of Wyoming County, New 
York; John A., the subject of this sketch; 
and Lora, who was the wife of the Rev. D. F. 
Hallock, of Long Island. The mother's 
death occurred in January, 1S92, at the age 



of eighty-seven years. In religious belief she 
was a Baptist, while her husband was a Uni- 
versal ist. 

The Rev. John Allen Kingsbury attended 
the several district schools of the places in 
which his father resided until he reached the 
age of fourteen. Then he began to earn his 
own living by working in his father's store. 
Later he obtained a position as clerk in a gen- 
eral store. He continued in this employment 
until he was twenty-two years of age, when he 
engaged as a salesman in a wholesale hat and 
fur establishment in New York City. At the 
end of three years there was formed a new 
firm, styled Lawrence, Griggs & Kingsbury, 
of which he became a partner. After con- 
ducting a successful business for nine years 
the firm sold out. Mr. Kingsbury, however, 
retained an interest in the store as a special 
partner for eleven years longer, when his 
relations with mercantile life ended. 

That was in the year 1875. Ten years be- 
fore this, in 1865, having for a long time 
previously taken a zealous part in church 
work, Mr. Kingsbury was appointed local 
preacher of the Methodist Episco])al church 
in Jersey City, N.J. In April, 1868, he was 
admitted to the Newark Annual Conference. 
Soon after he received for his first clerical 
charge Roundbrook, Somerset County, N.J. 
In the course of the three years spent here he 
was ordained Deacon. He was next assigned 
to Scotch Plains, where in 1872 he was made 
Klder. He remaineil only one year, but he 
found it sufficient time to build a church. 
Tlien he went to Dunellen, Middlesex County, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



233 



for a year and built another church. After 
this he ministered in Perth Amboy, N.J., for 
nearly three years, and at Whitehous'e, N.J., 
for two years. From Whitehouse he was sent 
to Boonton, Morris County, where there was a 
large church laboring under a heavy debt, that 
threatened to swamp the congregation. Here 
his business experience enabled him to so 
deal with the difficulty that the floating debt 
was paid in a brief time. His ministry lasted 
two years, after which he stayed one year in 
Newark, building another church. He was 
now assigned to Rossville, L.I. His health 
was greatly benefited by his stay of three 
years in this place. From there he went to 
Jersey City, where he ministered for two 
years, and built his fijurth church, known as 
Janes Church. Relapsing into ill health after 
this work, he sought a less laborious charge, 
and obtained it in Areola, Bergen County. 
But his health became poorer; and at length, 
after one year more, he was obliged to retire 
from the field where he had worked so faith- 
fully in the service of Christianity. In 1S90 
he came to Vineland, where he has resided 
since, compelled to abstain from active occu- 
pation in caring for his health. 

On January, 1S54, he was united in matri- 
mony with ICmil)- Groger, daughter of Will- 
iam B. Groger. They had five children, of 
whom four failed to reach maturity. The sur- 
vivor is Cora, who first married Knight 
Overington, of lirooklyn, N.Y. She is now 
the wife of William Stone, of Vineland. Her 
mother is of the same religious belief as her 
father. Mr. Kingsbury entered the fraternity 



of A. F. & A. M., in Jamestown, N.Y., 
and was subsequently Chaplain of a lodge in 
Jersey City. Now, at the close of a well- 
spent life, he is "waiting at the gate," iiojiing 
that he has earned the reward promised by the 
Master to the "good and faitiiful servant." 



W^=^ 



NSLOW LAFAYETTE FISH, an 
esteemed resident of Landis town- 
ship, was born January 16, 1825, in Hart- 
land, Windsor County, Vt, son of Otis and 
Theoda (Kimball) Fish. His grandfather on 
the father's side fought for American indepen- 
dence in the Revolutionary War. Otis Fish 
was a native of Braintree, Mass., born about 
the year 1792. Having been educated in the 
district school, he made a living by farming 
and the making of ship spars in Hartland. 
He was also clerk of the district school. By 
his wife, Theoda, who was daughter of 
Phineas Kimball, of Fairlee, \'t., he became 
the father of eleven children, nine of wiiom 
attained maturity. These were: Zelotes, Ben- 
jamin P^ranklin, Clara, Thirza K., limeline, 
Orpha Taylor, Lydia A., Winslow L., and 
Louisa. ' Clara became the wife of Alfred 
Neal, Esq.; Thirza K. married the Rev. 
James L. Lathrop, a Baptist minister, who has 
since died; Emeline, now deceased, was the 
wife of Levi Boynton, of Springfield, Mass. ; 
Orpha Taylor became the wife of Justin Hutch- 
inson, of Manchester, N.H.; and Lydia A. 
married successively Moses Hubbard and Will- 
iam I'Y'nu, both now deceased. The mother 
was a member of the Congregational church. 



234 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Winslow Lafayette Fish attended the dis- 
trict school for the customary period, and then 
learned the trade of wool-carding and cloth- 
dressing, which he never worked at afterward. 
After spending the following year in Boston, 
he was employed for three years in a sash and 
blind factory in Manchester, N.H. In 1S49, 
catching the gold fever, he joined a company 
of one hundred and twenty-five men, who 
bought the ship "Regulus," of eight hundred 
tons' burden, repaired her, provisioned her for 
eighteen months and one hundred and thirty- 
five men, and on March 4 sailed away from 
T Wharf, Boston, by the Cape route, for the 
gold fields of California. They stayed a week 
at Rio Janeiro, which they reached in fifty 
days. Rounding Cape Horn, -they had the 
usual experience of stormy weather, which 
continued during the voyage up to Callao, 
where they remained a week making necessary 
repairs. Four weeks after their departure 
from Callao they arrived at San Francisco, 
being then seven months out from Boston. 
The owners then had the vessel laid up, and, 
leaving one of the directors in charge of her, 
they took their way to the gold fields. No 
.sooner had they turned their backs than the 
man left behind sold for eight hundred dollars 
the ship that had cost them thirty-six thousanil 
dollars, and went off elsewhere. The gokl 
seekers betook themselves to Beal's Bar, at 
the junction of the north and south forks of 
the American River, and, chartering a flat- 
bottomed steamer, went up the Sacramento 
River, until their craft struck a snag and 
sunk. As the hurricane-deik remained above 



water, no lives were lost, but all on board 
were obliged to spend the night on the deck. 
Next morning they were rescued from their 
uncomfortable position. On inquiring the 
name of the place they had reached, they were 
informed that it was Sacramento City. At 
that time the municipality contained one 
house of ten-foot stud, together with a port- 
able saw-mill. In one year from that time, 
when Mr. Fish visited it again, the place was 
occupied by a large city with its streets and 
brick blocks. 

After some time Mr. Fish got ahead of his 
personal necessities by a thousand dollars, and 
he then started on a prospecting trip up the 
Sierras. In this venture he lost all his 
money, and his mule was stolen from him. 
He then worked for a short time at Beal's Bar 
and Willow Grove, and soon after discovered 
a bar on the river that turned out very profit- 
able. Following upon this piece of good 
luck, he found a prairie that was quite rich in 
gold, but the place could not be worked until 
the rainy season. He went next to the Trin- 
ity River, and was also successful. Through- 
out his entire stay in California Mr. I'^ish 
was accompanied by two faithful com|)an- 
ions, Alfred Bagley and John Bennett. In 
185 1 he abandoned mining, and, with these 
friends, purchased a ranch in the Sacramento 
Valley, and engaged in stock keeping. Be- 
sides having eighteen cows and a pair of 
mules, they had the herding of three hundred 
and sixty head of horses and mules, for which 
they were paid at the rate of four dollars per 
head every month. They also supplied Shasta 



BIOGRAPH[CAL REVIEW 



235 



City, about eight miles away up the moun- 
tains, with miltc, for which they charged one 
dollar per gallon, and with butter, for which 
they got three dollars per pound. At the end 
of six months spent in this occupation I\Ir. 
Kish sold his interest to his partners, and 
started for the Kast via Graytown. He ar- 
rived in New York on the ship "Daniel Web- 
ster," and went thence to New Hampshire. 
During the next ten years he conducted a 
shingle and clapboard mill in Canaan, N.H. 
On April 21, 1S62, he came to Vineland, 
among the first settlers of the place, and has 
since been a resident of the township. At 
first he bought a farm of ten acres. This he 
sold at the end of a year, and bought another 
more to his liking of the same extent. His 
chief employments have been those of carpen- 
ter and builder. He has erected a large num- 
ber of fine residences, the last of which is that 
of Edward Manks on Landis Avenue, finished 
in 1S95. Recently he has taken to raising 
pigeons, of which he now has four hundred 
pair. 

In 1S52, September 26, he was united in 
matrimony with Miss Eveline M. Heath, 
daughter of David Heath, of Vershire, Vt. 
She died February 23, 1864, aged thirty-two 
years, five months, and seven days, leaving 
si.x children. These were: Frank W., born 
August 2, 1853; George \V., born August 31,- 
1855; Edwin Arthur, born June 29, 1857; 
Armintha Eviline, born February 26, 1859, 
who is the wife of James Robertson, of ]5ris- 
tol, R.I.; James L., born June 7, 1861; and 
Clara Melissa, born February 18, 1864, who 



at her mother's death was adopted by Captain 
Albert Hall, of San Francisco. Mr. Fish 
married again June 9, 1864, taking for his 
second wife Zeruiah Heath, the sister of his 
first wife. liy this marriage he became the 
father of Clarence Lincoln, born April 3, 
1865. His wife, Zeruiah, who was born July 
7, 1825, died September 26, 1881. On July 
ig, 1883, he entered a third marriage, by 
which he was united to Mrs. Sarah Sharpe, 
widow of the late rifle manufacturer of that 
name and a daughter of William Chadwick. 
Mrs. Fish has one son by her late husband, 
Leone S. Sharpe, of New York. In his 
seventy-second year, few of the surviving 
forty-niners can relate their e.xjieriences of 
that exciting period in California more graph- 
ically than does Mr. Fish. 



7TAAPTAIN WILLIAM GLENN 
I jK ROI3BINSON, a well-known resident 

^ ' of Dividing Creek, engaged in the 

oyster business, was born near this place, 
April 7, 1S42, son of William and Mary 
(Glenn) Robbinson. His father, a native of 
Port Norris, this county, born in 1807, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of 
that town. While yet very young he com- 
menced to follow the sea on a wood shallop, 
conveying freight between points in Cumber- 
land County and the city of Philadelphia. 
He was but a young man when he became 
master and part owner of a vessel. He fol- 
lowed this employment almost througiiout his 
whole life. I'ailing health obliged him to 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



quit seafaring two years before his death, 
which occurred in 1855, when he was forty- 
seven years old. Me married Miss Mary 
Glenn, a daughter of Mr. John Glenn, a wharf 
builder of Philadelphia. She had eight chil- 
dren, five of whom still survive, namely: 
Elizabeth, who is now the widow of the late 
Philip Clark, and resides at Dividing Creek; 
Mary, who became the wife of Charles Sloane, 
of Philadelphia, after whose decease she mar- 
ried I'hilip Baker, who also passed away in 
1889; William Glenn, the subject of this 
sketch; Silas, of whom there is no special 
record; and Eliza K., who married William 
Gandy, an oysterman, of Dividing Creek. 
The mother, who was a member of the Baptist 
church of Dividing Creek, passed away in 
December, 1878. 

Captain William Glenn Robbinson attended 
the public schools of Dividing Creek in the 
winter term until he was ten years of age. 
He then went with his father, sailing on a 
wood shallop for about two and a half years. 
In the fall of 1S54 he obtained employment on 
an oyster boat, and eight years after he be- 
came captain of the same craft. He disposed 
of his vessel in 1893, but is still engaged in 
oyster fishing. 

On January 28, 1866, Mr. Robbinson mar- 
ried Miss Hannah Rebecca Chew, a daughter 
of the Rev. Jonas Chew, a Methodist Epis- 
copal clergyman of the New Jersey Confer- 
ence. Her great-grandfather, Andrew J. 
Chew, was an itinerant preacher of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, traversing his circuit 
in New Jersey on horseback. Her paternal 



grandfather, who also bore the name of An- 
drew J., was likewise a minister of the same 
denomination. He was not a member of the 
Conference, though he often filled the pulpit 
as a supply. Besides preaching he also taught 
school for a number of years. His son, Jonas 
Chew, who was born at Mantua, Gloucester 
County, was also in the early part of his life 
engaged in school-teaching. Afterward he 
took up the business of ship-building at 
Penn's Grove, Salem County, where he 
launched several boats, employing a large 
number of workmen. He subsequently pur- 
chased a farm, which he conducted for about 
three years. In this period he was appointed 
a local preacher, and in 1S56 he was made a 
travelling preacher. After laboring in this 
last capacity for five years his voice failed 
him, and he returned to his farm in Dividing 
Creek. He personally conducted the farm for 
about two years, after which he placed it in 
charge of another person, and engaged in the 
construction of oyster boats. He had com- 
pleted one boat and had another in process of 
construction when his decease occurred. He 
wedded Miss Lucetta Pierce, a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Pierce, of Williamstown, 
N.J., and they had eleven children, nine of 
whom grew to maturity; namely, John Iv, 
Abigail A., Charles W., Andrew J., Rebecca, 
Wilbur E., Ann liliza, Hannah Rebecca, and 
William V. Mr. Chew passed away October 
9, 1866, at the age of fifty-nine years; and 
his wife dieil in March, 1889, aged seventy- 
four years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robbinson's union was 




HENRY B. CONNER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



239 



blessed in the birth of six children, five of 
whom are living. These are: Laura, who is 
now Mrs. Alexander Perry, of Dividing Creek; 
Lewis H., born at Dividing Creek, August 
14, 1 87 1, who since September, 1894, has 
been the superintendent of the South Jersey 
Traction Company; Etta, who is now the wife 
of George Munch, of Dividing Creek; Bessie; 
and Paul. 

Captain Robbinson fraternizes with the In- 
depentlent Order of Odd P^ellows, being Past 
Grand of Social Lodge, No. S3, at Dividing- 
Creek. He also belongs to the local lodge of 
the Good Intent Beneficial Society. In na- 
tional politics he is a Republican. Both he 
and Mrs. Robinson arc in fellowship with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Dividing- 
Creek, which he serves in the capacity of 
Trustee and steward. 




ENRY BROOKS CONNER, a pros- 
perous general farmer of Newport, 
N.J., was born in Eairfield town- 
ship, October 19, 1834, son of David D. and 
Ann P. (Brooks) Conner. 

David D. Conner was a native of Eairfield 
township, where his education was acquired 
in the con-inion schools. As his father died 
when he was very young, he went to live with 
Henry Brooks, an extensive farmer and large 
land-owner. He labored diligently as a farm 
assistant for some time, and eventually mar- 
ried Ann P., daughter of his employer. 
Henry Brooks was very well-to-do, owning 
several farms upon Jones's Island; and he 



gave the land upon which the school-house 
now stands. At his death he left the home- 
stead farm to his daughter, and Mr. Conner's 
parents resided there for the rest of their 
lives. David D. Conner became an energetic 
tiller of the soil, cultivating general farm 
products, and keei)ing quite a number of cattle 
and sheep; and he also raised one or two colts 
each year. He was well and favorably known 
as a useful and worthy citizen, who ably and 
faithfully served as Overseer of Roads. At 
one tin-ie he was connected with the Sons of 
Temperance. He was an active member of 
the Second Presbyterian Church, devoting 
considerable time to church work; and he 
was an Elder for several years, or until his 
death, which took place December 14, 1893. 
His wife became the mother of five children, 
as follows: Hannah, wife of D. C. Rocap; 
Henry B., the subject of this sketch; Esther, 
wife of William Robinson; David, who is no 
longer living; and Harlan Page, \vho died in 
young manhood. Mrs. Ann P. Conner died 
March 12, 1850. 

Henry Brooks Conner passed his boyhood in 
attending the common schools of his native 
town, and he resided at home until attaining 
his majority. He then engaged in oyster fish- 
ing for one season, after which he ran a farm 
on shares in Fairfield for two years; and for 
the succeeding year he was again employed in 
the oyster fisheries. He then bought a farm 
upon Jones's Island, which he sold seven years 
later, in order to purchase a smaller piece of 
property; and, after carrying that on for six 
years, he bought his present farm in Newport. 



24° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He owns one hundred and eighty acres of 
land, forty of which are under cultivation; and 
besides strawberries and other products he 
raises large quantities of sweet potatoes, from 
five to six hundred bushels annually, cuts 
about fifty tons of hay, keeps six or eight cows, 
and produces a fine quality of butter. He is 
exceedingly energetic and practical, never 
losing an opportunity for advantage; and he 
realizes good financial returns for his labor. 

Mr. Conner wedded Sarah ^^, daughter of 
Henry B. Robinson, of F"airfield, and they 
arc the parents of three children, namely: 
Anna P., wife of Eli Worten; Harry B. ; and 
David D. Although deeply interested in the 
general welfare and improvement of the town, 
Mr. Conner is not an aspirant for public office; 
and he prefers to spend what leisure time he 
has in social enjoyment. He has been 
officially connected with the Second Presby- 
terian Church in Cedarville, of which Mrs. 
Conner is a mcnil)cr. 



■4^*^» 



tOBERT MORE, Jr., President of the 
More-Jonas Glass Company of Bridge- 
"^ ton, was born May 14, 1S54, in 
Harmony, Iloiiewell township, N.J., on the 
More homestead, which has been in the family 
several generations, and is now owned by 
Robert More, .Sr. The latter has for years 
occupied a prominent place among the busi- 
ness men of Bridgcton, N.J. Robert More, 
Jr., received a good education, attending the 
common schools of his native place, Shiloh 
Academy, and the West Jersey Academy at 



Bridgeton. In 1866 he was appointed page 
in the State Assembly, of which his father 
was a member, and went to Trenton to enter 
upon the duties of his office. Here in his 
free time he attended Bryant & Stratton's 
Business College, until he completed the 
course and graduated. Having been twice re- 
appointed page, he served three years in that 
capacity in the Assembly. During the three 
years following he was Assistant Sergeant-at- 
arms of the Senate. In these offices he was 
brought into contact with some of the bright- 
est men of the State. At that time Governor 
Beadle was President of the Senate, and Leon 
Abbott, John R. McPherson, and William J. 
Sewall were members. 

While residing in Trenton, Mr. More, with 
his room-mate, began to study pharmacy, with 
the idea of buying and conducting a pharma- 
ceutical establishment. His father discoun- 
tenanced the plan; but, still wishing to be- 
come versed in medical lore, the son entered 
Jefferson Medical College. Soon after, how- 
ever, he voluntarily decided on a business 
career, and started a commission agency in 
Camden, N.J. Poinding himself not very well 
fitted for this business, he abandoned it, and 
engaged in that of flour and feed. He bought 
out an old established firm in Bridgeton, and 
there built up a large trade. He then bought 
the West Jersey Express line in Bridgeton, in 
connection with the West Jersey Express 
Company. After this he took up the manu- 
facture of glass witli his brother Richard and 
Mr. Jonas. The capital with which tliis en- 
terprise was started was limited; biit the part- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



241 



ners were men of ability, and soon had matters 
on a firm footing. They built a small factory 
on the site of the present establishment. 
They manufactured at first only bottles, and 
began with one furnace and about twenty-five 
men. They now have a large establishment, 
give steady employment to about two hundred 
and fifty men, and manufacture both bottles 
and window glass. The general manufactory 
was incorporated with a capital of one hundred 
thousand dollars, and the window glass depart- 
ment with a capital of fifty thousand dollars. 
The two departments are under the manage- 
ment of the More-Jonas Glass Company, of 
which Mr. More is President. The concerns 
cover five acres of ground, and have switches 
from the West Jersey and the South Central 
Railroads at the doors. Three large furnaces 
are in almost constant operation, the factory 
closing only during the heated summer term, 
when all glass workers rest from their labor. 
In the fall of 1895 the company added a gen- 
eral supply store. They now have a fully and 
finely equipped manufactory and one of the 
largest in the State. The sand which the com- 
pany uses comes from their own pits; and they 
ship large quantities of it, supplying other 
manufacturers East and West. 

Mr. More, who has always been a lover of 
horses, at one time was engaged in raising 
thoroughbreds, and trained and dealt exten- 
sively in trotting horses. At the present 
time he owns one of the handsomest and 
fastest horses in the country, Ben D., a six- 
year-oUl, with a record of 2.06 3-4. It has 
also done an eighth of a mile in fourteen 



seconds, and a quarter of a mile in twenty- 
nine seconds. This horse has been a figure in 
several races on the grand circuits, and at De- 
troit and Cleveland made a record of the fast- 
est five-heat and eight-heat pacing in the 
world. 

On February 23, 1S81, Mr. More was mar- 
rietl to Ada B., daughter of Robert H. Dare, 
of Bridgeton. He is a Ma.son of Brcarly 
Lodge of Bridgeton, and belongs to the 
Orders of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle. He and his 
wife are members of the First Presbyterian 
Church. They live in a handsome double 
brick house at 214 Pearl Street, which Mr. 
More erected. Mr. More is a high type of 
our American business men in the present day. 




ILLIAM H. C. SMITH, M.D., of 

Millville, N.J., one of the leading 
physicians of Cumberland County, New Jer- 
sey, son of Dr. William F. and Harriet E. 
(Whitaker) Smith, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., August 2, 1848. He comes of old New 
Jersey stock on both sides of the family. On 
the paternal side he traces his descent from 
one of three brothers who settled at Chestnut 
Neck, Atlantic County, N.J., in the seven- 
teenth century. 

The Rev. Asa Smith, the grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, was born in Janu- 
ary, 1772. He was one of the pioneer Meth- 
odist ministers in this section of the countrv, 
and was occupied during a great part of his 
life as a circuit rider, travelling much of the 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



time on horseback through Delaware, New 
Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Jour- 
neying through wooded and unbroken country, 
the messenger of the gospel suffered many 
hardships. The Rev. Mr. Smith was often 
away from home four months at a time on a 
circuit, lie lived at different times in Mary- 
land and New Jersey, and was widely known 
and highly esteemed. At the time of his 
death, in 1847, he was one of the officers of the 
Methodist Episcopal Conference; and he was 
engaged as a preacher up to the very last. 
His remains are interred at Penn's Grove, 
N.J. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Abigail Dennis, was born in 1774, and died 
in 1850. They reared a large family. 

Their son William F. was born in Phila- 
delphia, January 10, 1813. Graduating from 
tiie high school of that city, he went to New 
York to take up the study of medicine with 
David Hosack, M.D., one of the prominent 
physicians of the time, colaborer with the 
elder Dr. Valentine Mott, and took a course of 
lectures at the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of New York. He graduated in the 
class of 1835, and joined the New York State 
Medical Society. Dr. William F. Smith 
practised for a while in Maryland and in Cum- 
berland and Gloucester Counties, New Jersey, 
and about 1846 settled in I'liihulclphia, which 
from that time forth was the scene of his 
labors. There for many years he conducted a 
large practice, chiefly medical, for after his 
eyesight began to fail he gave up surgery; 
and many are living to-day who speak ot him 
with grateful appreciation. Besides attentling 



to his practice he was for a while professor of 
the institutes of medicine in the American 
Medical College of Philadelphia, a good, 
high-grade school, which, though deserving a 
better fate, had a short life, dying from want 
of support only. The mother of our subject 
was his father's second wife. She was the 
daughter of Henry and I.ydia (Shaw) Whit- 
aker, of Philadelphia, ami niece of David 
Whitaker, a member of the New Jersey legis- 
lature, and of Thomas Whitaker, who was the 
father of Dr. Jonathan S. Whitaker, of Mill- 
ville. The children of the elder Dr. Smith's 
first union died before attaining maturity. 
The children of his second union are: Flor- 
ence A., wife of F. J. Roberts, of Delaware 
Water Gap; Thomas VV., of Philadelphia; 
Harriet A., wife of Lewis F. Mulfortl, of that 
city; Leroy V. , who died in 1876; and Will- 
iam II. C, who is the eldest. Dr. and Mrs. 
William Smith were members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

William H. C. Smith attended the Phila- 
delphia High School, in the mean time study- 
ing medicine with his father; and later he 
attended medical lectures at the University of 
Pennsylvania. The war breaking out before 
his course of study was finished, he responded 
to the call of the government for surgeons, 
passed an examination, and was accepted. 
The high-school authorities, in consideration 
of the fact that a number had joined the army, 
graduated young Smith and his comrades with- 
out an examination; but the class record 
showed him to be fully qualified to receive a 
tliploma. In the spring of 1S63 he was ap- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



243 



pointed acting assistant surgeon at Satter- 
ley General Hospital, and he subsequently 
served in other places where surgeons were re- 
c|uired. In the early part of 1864, his health 
being undermined by his arduous work, which 
was too heavy for a youth of his age, he re- 
turned to the University of Pennsylvania, 
from which he was graduated in 1S66. He 
liad had his hospital experience as a member 
of the army corps; and so he opened an office 
immediately after receiving his medical 
diploma, and practised in Philadelphia, until 
poor health made country air necessary. Then, 
in the spring of 1869, he became a resident 
of Millville, where he has made his home for 
the greater part of the time since. Dr. 
Smith, with one other physician, has attended 
to all the surgical cases in Millville for many 
years. Dr. Smith is Secretary of the United 
States Pension Board. He is a member of the 
Cumberland County Medical Society, the old- 
est district society in the State, of which he 
was President a number of years and subse- 
quently reporter, and is permanent representa- 
tive from Cumberland County to the State 
Medical Society of New Jersey, an office which 
was created five years ago, and has been held 
by Dr. Smith ever since. It is a great honor 
to hold the office of permanent representative, 
for the society is composed of some of the 
brightest and best scientific scholars in the 
State. The Doctor was also for several years 
superintendent of pidjlic schools in Millville. 

In April, 1868, he was married to Miss 
Artemisia Mulford, daughter of Lorenzo F. 
Mulford, of Millville, a carpenter and builder. 



He was the son of Thomas Mulford, a contrac- 
tor of Maryland, who took part in the build- 
ing of the Delaware & Chesapeake Canal, ami 
previous to that time was a resident of South 
Jersey, where the family has been favorably 
known for generations. The Doctor and his 
wife have four children, namely: Harry C, 
a druggist; D. Evans, a graduate of the Phil- 
adelphia College of Pharmacy, in business in 
Millville; Frank C, an apprenticed machin- 
ist; and Albert J., an apprenticed druggist. 

In politics Dr. Smith is independent, favor- 
ing the Democratic side. He is Past Master 
of Shekinah Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and the 
only living charter member of Salome Lodge 
of Cedarville, which he organized, and of 
which he was Past Master. He is Past High 
Priest of Richmond Chapter, No. 22, belongs 
to Olivet Commandery, No. 10, Knights 
Templars, of which he is Past Commander, 
and by virtue of the offices he has held is a 
member of the Grand Lodge, Chapter, and 
Commandery of the State; and he has at- 
tended many triennial conclaves. The Doctor 
attends and helps to support the Presbyterian 
church, of which his wife is a member. 




'^T^RS. ARTEMISIA SMITH, the 
wife of Dr. William II. C. Smith, 
of Millville, N.J., and a daughter 
of Lorenzo and Hannah J. (Chew) Mulford, is 
a native of this city. Her paternal grand- 
father, Thomas Mulford, was the representa- 
tive of an old and respected family of Cumber- 
land County. He was a large farmer and 



2 44 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



stock breeder, and was one of the contractors 
and builders of the Delaware & Chesapeake 
Canal. He resided for some time at the 
Pivot Bridge in St. George's, Del., where he 
was widely reinited to be an enterprising and 
energetic business man. He married Miss 
Rebecca Carroll, of Port Elizabeth, N.J., and 
they reared two children to maturity — Martha 
(Mrs. Sutton) and Lorenzo V. 

Lorenzo F. Mulford, who was born in 
Bricksboro, Cumberland County, N.J., on 
October 17, 1822, removed with his parents 
to Pivot Bridge, Del., when he was only 
four years of age. He obtained his rudi- 
mentary education in the common schools; 
and, his father dying and his mother subse- 
quently remarrying, he, when only a lad, came 
to Millville, to make his home with an uncle. 
In his young manhood he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade, and became a pump-maker. He 
was also a contractor and builder; and he was 
appointed Supervisor of Roads and Streets in 
Milhille, antl subsequently likewise Super- 
intendent of Public Works. He owned and 
im|5roved quite an amount of real estate in 
Millville. On April 8, 1S42, Mr. Mulford 
wedded Miss Hannah J. Chew, a daughter of 
Benjamin F. Chew, of Millville. Her pater- 
nal grandfather was a very prominent planter 
of Havre de Grace, owning a large estate and 
many slaves. But in his will it was specified 
that his slaves, male and female, should be set 
at liberty at the ages respectively of twenty- 
one and eighteen years. He and his wife be- 
came the parents of seven children, one of 
whom was Benjamin F. , the grandfather of 



Mrs. Smith. He was born at Havre de Grace; 
and as a young man he came to Millville, en- 
tering the employment of the Cumberland 
Furnace Company, of which he subsequently 
became the manager. He was always either 
the proprietor or manager of a store of some 
description. For three years he represented 
his district in the New Jersey legislature. 
Mr. Chew married Miss Fannie Ayers, a na- 
tive of Cumberland County and a daughter of 
I'llisha and Hannah Ayers. Their union was 
favored in the birth of six children, namely: 
Margaret R., who was the wife of D. G. 
Evans, of Philadelphia, Pa. ; Hannah J., the 
mother of Mrs. Smith; N. F., of Philadel- 
phia; H. K., also of that city; E. A., now 
Mrs. John Mickle, of Philadelphia; and 
Charles, who is now deceased. Mr. Chew 
was a member of the Presbyterian church. 
He died in 1S44, and Mrs. Chew in April, 
1893. Si-x of the children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Mulford still survive, namely: Martha 
S., who is now the wife of Dr. Albert Porch, 
of Clayton, N.J. ; Artemisia, now Mrs. Will- 
iam H. C. Smith; Lewis ¥., who is employed 
in the ofifice of the Pullman Palace Car office 
at Jersey City, N.J. ; P'annie C, who resides 
at her father's home; George C, who offici- 
ates as the superintendent of the mould-room 
of a glass manufactory at Marion, Ind. ; and 
Rebecca, the wife of George Bacon, who is 
the manager of the Whitall, Palmer & Co. "s 
glass works, located at Millville, N.J. 

Mr. Mulford died December 31, 1894; but 
his wife survi\es him, making her home at 
227 Sassafras Street, in a fine old dwelling, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 45 



where she has resided for thirty-five years. 
She has been a member of the First Presby- 
terian Church of INIillville for many years, and 
has taken a very active part in the various 
lines of Christian work conducted by that so- 
ciety. In the Presbyterian missionary socie- 
ties she has played a leading part, and in the 
Sunday-school she officiated as a teacher for a 
long [leriod. Mrs. Mulford has likewise been 
the Treasurer of the Church Building Associa- 
tion ever since it was founded, a decade ago. 
She is also prominently connected with the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union of 
Millville, and for several years she has acted 
as the Treasurer of the same. She has been 
the representative of that branch to the State 
Convention, and also delegate to the National 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union Con- 
vention held in New York. 

Artemisia Mulford acquired her early edu- 
cation in the public schools of this city. On 
April 29, 1868, she was united in marriage 
with Dr. William H. C. Smith, a son of Dr. 
William F. and Harriet F. (Whitaker) Smith, 
of Philadel[)hia, Pa., where he was born Au- 
gust 2, 1848. He is next to the oldest 
practising pliysician of Millville, and a de- 
tailed sketch of his life may be found else- 
where in this work. Dr. and Mrs. Smith 
have four children, as follows: Harry C. ; D. 
Fvans, who is now practising pharmacy in 
Millville, he being a graduate of the Philadel- 
phia College of Pharmacy; Frank C, an ap- 
prenticed machinist of Millville; and Albert 
J., now an apprenticed druggist. 

Mrs. Smith is a member of the F"irst Pres- 




byterian Church of Millville, which her hus- 
band, Dr. Smith, also attends and liberally 
supports. 

FORGE F. HOLT, a well-known 
J^J_ stock farmer of Landis township, was 
born in Windham County, Connecticut, son of 
Charles and Nancy (Ingalls) Holt, April 27, 
1S29. His paternal grandfather was Oliver 
Holt. Grandfather Ingalls was for many 
years a member of the Connecticut legis- 
lature, and also held the offices of County Sur- 
veyor and County Judge in the same State. 
Charles Holt, who was a native of Pomfret, 
Conn., born in May, 1806, was educated in 
the district schools. Being left fatherless 
when quite young, he was obliged to work for 
his living at an earlier age than was usual. 
His chief occupation was that of assistant on 
farms. This he followed until his marriage, 
after which he engaged in farming on his own 



account. 



In iS6s he came to Vinelanc 



where he bought a farm, and was thereafter 
occupied in cultivating it until his death, 
which occurred March 30, 1874. His wife, 
who was a daughter of Lemuel Ingalls, of 
Pomfret, bore him four children — George F., 
Elizabeth L., Charles E., and Sarah C. 
Elizabeth L. became the wife of Daniel Ar- 
nold, Jr., of Killingly, Conn.; and Sarah C, 
the wife of Henry D. Sanford, of Webster, 
IMass. The mother died December 2, 1840, 
aged fort_\-four years. She was a member of 
the Presbyterian church, which her husband 
attended and supported. 

George E. Holt is indebted to the district 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



schools for a substantial education. After 
leaving school he learned the shoemaker's 
trade. He worked at this and at farming, as 
the opportunity offered, until 1854, when he 
left Hampton, Conn., for I.awrence, Kan. 
Here he spent two years in farming. Then 
he started a shoe store, where, besides making 
shoes, he carried on a wholesale and a retail 
business for eight years, during which he was 
quite prosperous. In August, 1S63, Ouan- 
trell's guerillas burned the town, and killed 
one hundred and eighty men. Mr. Holt, who 
was in bed when the attack began, was shot in 
view of his wife, and left for dead; and his 
store and residence were looted and burned. 
Some hours later a young man, who found him 
still alive, lying on the ground, took him to a 
neighbor's house that escaped burning, and 
had his wound attended to. In about six 
montlis from that time he was restored to 
health, but he still carries the bullet in the 
back of his neck. He returned East in the 
fall of 1S64, and bought a farm in South 
Vinelaud. The care of this, together with 
occasional employment at his trade, formed 
his chief occupation up to the year 1877, 
when he received charge of the large stock 
farm of C. W. Kellogg, the well-known horse 
dealer of New York. The place contains four 
hundred and fofty acres; and upon it are kejit 
about twenty head of registered horses and 
colts, with about fourteen head of registered 
Jersey cattle. 

In 1 85 1, September 21, Mr. Holt was 
united iii matrimony with Miss Lora TI. 
Abbott, daughter of James Abbott, of Hamp- 



ton, Conn., and became the father of two chil- 
dren — George Byron and Joseph W. Both 
parents were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. The mother died January 19, 
1892. The father, who continues to discharge 
the duties of superintendent of the stock farm, 
at one time had affiliation with Lawrence 
Lodge, No. 21, Independent Order of Fores- 
ters, of which he was a Past Grand Master. 
His son, Joseph W., who wa^ born in Law- 
rence, Kan., May i, 1862, was educated in 
the public schools of South Vineland. After 
leaving school he remained on the farm, as- 
sisting in the care of it, and acquiring a 
thorough knowledge of farming. He has had 
the sole care of the property since 1894. On 
November 28, 1882, he married .\lida Palmer, 
daughter of Charles Palmer, of Vinelaml, and 
became the father of si.\ children, four of 
whom are living; namely, Pauline R., Lora 
]., Alvin Palmer, and Lawrence Earl. Mr. 
Joseph Holt is a member of Vineland Lodge, 
No. 69, A. F. & A. M. 




ALDO F. SAWYER, M.D., a 
popular physician and surgeon of 
Vineland, was born October 15, 1865, in 
Fond du Lac, Wis., son of James and Lucy 
(Meacham) Sawyer. He is of Puritan descent 
through both mother and father. On the pa- 
ternal side his earliest ancestor in this coun- 
try was John Sawyer, of Somersetshire, Eng- 
land, who came to America in 1670. His 
grandfather, P^benezer Sawyer, was a Vermont 
farmer. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



247 



James Sawyer was born December 25, 1826, 
at Thetford, Vt. In 1S52 or 1853 he went to 
Kansas, where lie was for some time asso- 
ciated with John Brown, of Osawatomie. He 
built the first house in Lawrence, and was so 
fortunate as to preserve his life and property 
during the border troubles.- After a residence 
of three years in Kansas he went to Wis- 
consin, and engaged in the lumber business. 
He was an energetic and ambitious man, and 
at one time owned and controlled the largest 
saw-mills in the North-west. Settling in 
Fond du Lac when it was a small place, he 
took an active interest in public affairs from 
the beginning. He rejiresented the town in 
the State legislature, and after its incorpora- 
tion as a city he served as a member of the 
City Council and as Mayor. Shortly after 
the close of the war, his health demanding a 
milder climate, he went to Datona, Fla. , and 
while there was appointed Postmaster. In 
1S68 he became a resident of Vineland, en- 
gaged in business there, and in the course of 
time acquired a large amount of real estate, 
including both farms and stores. Here also 
he was a leading public man, and served on 
the Township Committee. He was an es- 
teemed member of the Masonic fraternity. 
His death occurred F'ebruary 4, 1S81, in his 
fifty-fifth year. Mrs. James Sawyer, who is 
yet living, was born in Moriah, N.Y., in 
1S27. She is a daughter of James Meacham, 
a farmer of that place, who was Captain of a 
company during the War of 1812. She and 
her husband reared two sons, namely: James 
\V., a resident of Brooklyn, N.Y. ; and 



Waldo F., the subject of this sketch. She is 
a member of the Congregational church, to 
which her husband also belonged. 

Waldo F. Sawyer, M.D., attended the pub- 
lic schools of Vineland, including the high 
school. Going to Michigan in 1882, he s]jent 
two years travelling in the North-west, and 
then returned home, and took up. the study of 
medicine with Dr. C. R. Wiley. He at- 
tended Ik'llevue Medical College, New York 
City, and Jefferson Medical College, Philadel- 
phia, graduating from the latter institution in 
1890. Previous to his graduation he gained 
much valuable experience in Pennsylvania, as 
a member of the Red Cross Society, in assist- 
ing for seven weeks the victims of the Johns- 
town flood. He was connected with the New 
Jersey National Guards for seven years; and, 
though bearing the rank of Second Sergeant, 
he was usually detached from his company and 
occupied with hospital service. Dr. Sawyer 
already has a large practice in Vineland and 
vicinity, and his visiting list is steadily in- 
creasing. He is a member of the County and 
State Medical Associations. In 1892 he was 
elected, on the Republican ticket, Coroner of 
Cumberland County, and served three years. 
He was also elected in the same year a mem- 
ber of the City Council for three years, and 
was re-elected in 1896. He has the distinc- 
tion of having introduced the original resolu- 
tion regarding Vineland's peculiar method of 
disposing of its sewage. 

On June 5, 1895, Dr. Sawyer was married 
to Miss Isabelle Hill, of Bear Brook, Canada, 
daughter of Alfred Hill, a well-known man of 



J 48 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



English origin. Dr. Sawyer is a member of 
Hobah Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Vineland; of the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics, in which he is 
Senior Past Councillor of Perseverance Coun- 
cil; and of Vineland Lodge and Eureka Chap- 
ter of the Masonic fraternity. He has a pleas- 
ant home at 109 South Seventh Street, where 
he has resided since he began to practice. 




iDMUND PARVIN, who for many years 
conducted an extensive butchering busi- 
ness in Bridgeton, N.J., and is now living in 
retirement, was born in this city, July 3, 
18 16, son of William and Sarah (Davis) Par- 
vin. Mr. Parvin's father was also a native of 
Cumberland County. He was born February 
26, 1790, in Deerfield township, and there ac- 
quired such education as the public schools of 
that day afforded. In 1816 he began carrying 
the United States mail between Bridgeton and 
Philadelphia, following that occupation stead- 
ily until 1851, when he retired from active 
labor, and passed the rest of his life at his 
home in Bridgeton. He died September 13, 
1872. His wife, Sarah Davis, whom he mar- 
ried March 17, 18 14, was a native of Deer- 
field. They had a family of seven children, 
as follows: Robert, deceased; Edmund, the 
subject of this sketch; Albert; Mary, wife of 
John Graham, of Bridgeton; Francis R. ; 
William; and Robert. Mr. Parvin's parents 
attendetl the Presbyterian church, of which 
his mother was a member. 

Edmund Parvin was educated in the pay 



schools of Bridgeton, and after completing his 
studies he learned the blacksmith's trade, 
which he followed as a journeyman for one 
year. He then went to Wisconsin, where he 
was for four years employed in the lead 
mines. Returning to Bridgeton in 1844, he 
became an employee at the Cumberland Nail 
and Iron Works, remaining thus engaged 
for eleven years. In 1856 he, with a part- 
ner, bought the butchering establishment of 
Daniel Davis, which was thenceforth carried 
on under the firm name of Parvin & Sneeden, 
and continued to do a large and profitable 
business until 1879, when he retired from 
the enterprise. Mr. Parvin is still both 
mentally and physically active, although he 
is numbered among the few octogenarians of 
this vicinity; and his natural brightness 
and vigorous constitution are comparatively 
undisturbed by the weight of years. 

On August 20, 1844, Mr. Parvin married 
Ann Barbara Rocap, daughter of Henry 
Rocap, of Germany. Seven children were 
born of this union, namely: Daniel, who is 
no longer living; William; Henry; Sarah, 
widow of Jonathan Riley, of Bridgeton; 
George; Mary, widow of Isaac Evans, of 
Salem County; and Anna B., wife of William 
Howell, of Millville. Mrs. Parvin died 
March 25, 1885, aged sixty-nine years. 

Mr. Parvin has been an energetic and suc- 
cessful business man; and he is highly es- 
teemed by his fellow-citizens, who regard him 
as one of the most worthy residents of Bridge- 
ton. He possesses social qualities which are 
heartily appreciated by his many frienils and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



251 



acquaintances, and in liis younger days he was 
an active member of the Independent Order 
of C)dd Fellows and the Sons of Temperance. 



(51 HOMAS F. AUSTIN, of Millville, a 
q )\ Representative of Cumberland County 
in the State Assembly, was born in Philadel- 
phia, Pa., July 15, 1864, son of George and 
Sarah R. (Sherwood) Austin, of Philadelphia. 
When he was six years old he came to Mill- 
ville with his parents, and was educated in 
the public schools of this place. Owing to 
the prolonged illness of his father he was 
compelled to leave school at thirteen, within 
a year of his graduation. He then went into 
the glass factory of Whitall, Tatum & Co., as 
attending boy, and worked in that capacity for 
two years. Following that he served an ap- 
prenticeship of four years as glass cutter. He 
has since been employed in that department, 
becoming thereby able to care for his widowed 
mother and sisters. On Xew Year's Day, 
iSSg, Mr. Austin was united in marriage with 
Miss Pauline Souder, a daughter of Samuel 
Souder, of Millville, and now has two daugh- 
ters — Grace and Helen. 

Although still a young man, Mr. Austin has 
had an interesting public career. A stanch 
Republican, he has interested himself in poli- 
tics and political work since he was fifteen 
years old. When twenty-three years of age 
he was elected Assessor of Ward 4 in the city 
of Millville. While holding that office he 
continued in his position in the shops, doing 
the work connected with this office after his 



regular work was completed. For three years, 
beginning in 1889, he was principal of the 
public night school. In 1890 he was ap- 
pointed one of the National Census Enumera- 
tors; and in February of the following year 
he received from Isaac Moffett, Chief Col- 
lector of the District, an appointment as Dep- 
uty Collector of Internal Revenue for the First 
Division of the First District of New Jersey, 
his territory embracing the counties of Cape 
May, Cumberland, and Salem. This office he 
continued to hold up to December 31, 1893, 
at which time he was obliged to resign, as he 
had been elected a member of the Assembly 
in the preceding November. Although this 
was his first nomination, and the district was 
alleged to have been "gerrymandered" in 
favor of the Democrats, he received a plurality 
of five hundred and twenty-five votes. Dur- 
ing the ensuing term in the Assembly he was 
Chairman of the Committee on Labor and In- 
dustries, a member of the Committees on P'ish 
and Game and Revision of Law, and of the 
joint Committee for Auditing the Treasurer's 
Accounts. He was instrumental in the pas- 
sage by the House of several bills of great 
value to labor organizations and laboring 
people, and put in other effective work in 
their interest. At the next election he was 
re-elected. The ensuing year he became 
memorable in the history of the labor question 
in Cumberland County, on accoimt of the agi- 
tation over the Cash 15ill, introduced by Mr. 
Bullock, of Paterson. This bill was sup- 
ported from the start by Mr. Austin. After 
standing a storm of opposition for eleven 



^5^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



weeks, it passed the House. It was amended 
in the Senate, and the amendment was con- 
curred in by the House. It was then sub- 
mitted to tlie Governor, who upon examina- 
tion found it so seriously mutilated and 
tampered with that he returned it to the leg- 
islature. It was thereupon rewritten, and re- 
introduced in the House, which again passed 
it; but under a suspension of rules it did not 
go beyond the Senate. In 1S95, contrary to 
custom and precedent, Mr. Austin received 
the nomination for a third term, and was 
elected. He is a conservative legislator on 
the labor problem, conceding the just rights 
of employers, but demanding due considera- 
tion for workmen. Careful at all times to 
avoid anything even tending toward fanati- 
cism, his aim is to benefit the labor, and not 
to prejudice the capitalist. Mr. Austin has 
affiliation with the Knights of Pythias and the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
He and Mrs. Austin attend and support the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which she is 
a member. He also contributes toward the 
support of the Trinity Methodist Episcopal 
Church, of which his father was one of the 
founders. 



(JOSEPH MASON, a successful real es- 
tate and insurance broker of Vineland, 
was born in Essex, England, on April 
20, 1829, son of George and Keziah (Stanley) 
Mason and grandson of George Mason, Sr. , a 
farmer of Bishop's Stortford, England. His 
father was a native of Bishop's Stortford, I'-ng- 
land. As his parents were in comfortable 



circumstances, he received the benefit of such 
an education as could be obtained in the 
schools of his native town. Throughout the 
active years of his life he carried on a suc- 
cessful horticultural business. His wife, 
Keziah, bore him seven children — George, 
Henry, Charles, Alfred, Joseph, Maria, and 
Sarah. Sarah died when fourteen years of 
age. Both parents were members of the Epis- 
copal church. 

Joseph Mason acquired the greater ]iart of 
his school education at a place called VVal- 
thamstow, Essex County, England. While 
still a school boy, he gained a practical 
knowledge of horticulture and the florist's 
business that he was afterward able to turn 
to good advantage. Upon leaving school he 
secured work in a grocery and general store at 
Woodford, and remained there for four or five 
years. He then went to London, where he 
availed himself of an opening in a collection 
house. By faithful and conscientious work 
he won the consitleration of his superiors, and 
was gradually advanced until finally he be- 
came the manager of the business. The 
strain was too much for his health, however; 
and twelve years from the time he entered 
the establishment as an under clerk he 
was obliged to resign. He returned to his 
parents' home in the country, where a few 
months were enough to renew his health and 
vigor. Coming back to London again, he be- 
came the manager of another collection agency 
in that city. In 1S54 he came to this coun- 
try, making his residence in West Hartford, 
Coim., where his brother, Charles Stanley 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2S3 



Mason, had a well-established nursery busi- 
ness. He joined his brother in a [jartnership, 
under which they transacted a prosperous busi- 
ness until the outbreak of the Rebellion. 
The partnership was then dissolved, and Jo- 
seph Mason embarked in the real estate and 
life and fire insurance business. He was one 
of the first to represent the /Etna Live Stock 
Insurance Company, which at that time was a 
new departure. In 1872 failing health again 
led him to make a change of locality, and he 
came to Vineland on a visit to a brother, who 
then owned a farm here. The climate proved 
so congenial, and his health improved so 
rapidly, that he decided to make this place his 
home. Some time after he began the publi- 
cation of a horticultural paper called A/ason's 
MoHtlily, devoted to the interests of Vineland, 
which has proved an influential agent in de- 
veloping this place and in bringing sundry in- 
dustries into it. He afterward sold the paper 
and his insurance business to Leonard S. 
Mulford. After this he engaged in the manu- 
facture of ladies', misses', and children's shoes 
for a time, and then resumed his former busi- 
ness of a real estate and insurance agent. In 
January, 1895, he received John A. Ackley as 
a partner; and the business has since been 
conducted under the firm name of Mason & 
Ackley. 

In 1873 Mr. Mason was united in marriage 
with Mrs. Charlotte K. (Puzy) Ruhl, of 
Barnes, FIsse.x County, England. He has 
been prominently identified with the public in- 
terests of Vinelantl. He was the first Mayor 
of the city, holding the office for two terms, 



and declining a third nomination. He was 
also Justice of the Peace for ten years. He 
is a Mason of Vineland Lodge, Eureka Chap- 
ter, and belongs to Vineland Castle of the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason are influential members of the 
Episcopal church, in which he is a Vestry- 
man and lay reader. 



(^OHN N. GLASPELL, of Bridgeton, 
the superintendent of schools for Cum- 
berland County, was born October 29, 
1S50, in the town of Greenwich, this county, 
son of Thomas D. and Christiana C. (Fithian) 
Glaspell. His grandfather, John Glaspell, a 
well educated man, was a farmer of Green- 
wich, and taught school near his home. 

Thomas D. Glaspell was also a native of 
Greenwich, born in October, 18 13. He was 
connected with a stage line for three years. 
The greater part of the rest of his life was 
devoted to farming and peach culture, in both 
of which he was very successful. In politics 
he took an active interest, loyally supporting 
the Republican party. He died in April, 
1S87. His wife, who was a daughter of 
Charles Beatty F"ithian, a farmer of Green- 
wich, is still living, and celebrated her 
seventy-ninth birthday in April, 1896. She 
was the mother of four children, namely: 
Enos E., a Grand Army man, who resided in 
Bridgeton, and died June 6, 1896; lulward 
M., a farmer of Greenwich, in whose home 
the mother spent her last days; John N., the 
subject of this sketch; and Mary, the wife of 



254 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Charles Rudderow, of Camden, N.J. The 
mother died July lo, 1896. 

John N. Glaspell received his early educa- 
tion in the schools of Greenwich, and spent 
two winters at the South Jersey Institute. 
He then entered on his career as a teacher, 
taking charge first of a school in his native 
district, where he taught for two years. For 
the following two years he conducted a school 
at Heming Row. In 1876 he was appointed 
principal of one of the leading schools of the 
county at Mauricetown, and efficiently filled 
the position for eleven years. Then, think- 
ing to try his ability in business, he was en- 
gaged as a butcher for a year and a half. 
Being elected in 1S91 principal of the Second 
Wartl School of Bridgeton, he resumed the 
teacher's chair. Among the several radical 
changes made in the Bridgeton schools, dur- 
ing the following spring, was the consolida- 
tion of the grammar department of Mr. Glas- 
pell's school with the course of the Central 
High School. Thereupon Mr. Glaspell re- 
signed his position, and has not been engaged 
in teaching since. He has long been promi- 
nent as a Republican, and in 1890 was elected 
to the Assembly from the Second Assembly 
District, which had been "gerrymandered" 
by the legislature of the previous year. This 
was shortly after he severed his connection 
with the Second Ward School, and was able 
to give his whole attention to his legislative 
duties. He took a special interest in the bill 
regarding the oystermen of the county. In 
1892 and 1893 he was sent again to tlie legis- 
lature by tile Re])Liblicans, despite a redistrict- 



ing that was expected to put him in a minor- 
ity. At the expiration of his last term he 
engaged as book-keeper for the State Mutual 
Benevolent and Life Association of Camden. 
This position he held until March 7, 1S95, 
when he was called to fill the unexpired term 
of Charles J. Hampton, county superintendent 
of schools. In the following September he 
was reappointed for the full term of three 
years. He has the oversight of all the public- 
school teachers within the county, excluding 
those of the cities. His practical experience 
as a teacher, added to his natural ability and 
good judgment, admirably qualify him for the 
important duty. 

In religious belief Mr. Glaspell is a Presby- 
terian. He is a Mason of Neptune Lodge of 
Mauricetown, Brearly Chapter of Bridgeton, 
and Olivet Commandery of Millville, and also 
belongs to the Order of American Mechanics. 




OVAL P. TULLICR, of Vineland, at- 
torney, counsellor-at-la\v, and master 
in chancery, although still a young 
man, has won quite a reputation in his ]irofes- 
sion. He was born at Newark, Oiiio, Febru- 
ary 12, 1859, son of Emory R. and Jane 
(Powers) Tuller. 

Emory R. Tuller, a native of Genesee, 
N.Y., born October i, 1824, acquired his 
early education in the public schools of his na- 
tive town. He subsequently took up the study 
of medicine, which he cimiplcted by a course 
at the Cleveland Homcuopathic Medical 
School, and was one of the first in this coun- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



255 



try to enter the field of homccopathic medical 
practice. After his graduation he went to 
I'airfield, Ohio, in 1S48, where he worked at 
his profession until 1853. He then removed 
to the city of Newark, Ohio, and was there in 
successful practice up to 1866. In March of 
that year Dr. Tuller came East with his wife 
and children, and settled in Vineland, N.J., 
when the place was buf three years old, and 
the stumps of the trees that were cut down in 
laying out the streets and highways were still 
plainly visible. He came here in the hope 
that his wife's health would be benefited by 
the change and with the intention of retiring 
from practice. He was probably the first 
homoeopathic doctor to settle here, although 
he was soon followed by another physician of 
the same school. Despite the fact that he 
had purposed to lay aside the cares of profes- 
sional life, he was often asked to visit pa- 
tients, and soon acquired a large and success- 
ful practice. His death occurred on August 
4, 1891. He was a member of the National 
Homoeopathic Societies and of those of Ohio 
and New Jersey. While located at Fairfield, 
Ohio, in 1 85 I Dr. Tuller was married to Miss 
Jane Powers, who was born January 5, 1825, 
daughter of Dr. Lemuel Powers, an allopathic 
physician and one of the pioneer doctors of 
the State of Ohio. Her grandfather was 
Grand Master of the Grand Masonic Lodge of 
Ohio when the fraternity's meetings were 
heUl in a cave in Columbus, Ohio. Six chil- 
dren were born to Dr. and Mrs. Tuller, 
namely: Malcolm B., now of Tennessee; 
Daisy, the wife of Herman E. Bonschur, an 



optician of Chestnut Street, Philadelphia; 
Horace L. , who died on November 10, 1S94; 
V\'illis N., of Cincinnati, Ohio; Royal P., the 
subject of this sketch; and John J., a physi- 
cian, who for several years was in active prac- 
tice here, but is now taking a special course 
of -Study at Vienna, Austria. The mother 
died June 23, 1895. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Swedenborgian church. 

Royal P. Tuller attended the common 
schools of Vineland until fifteen years of age. 
After leaving school he continued to study 
without a teacher. Being able to turn his 
hand to a variety of occupations, he in time 
earned sufficient to enable him to take up the 
study of law, first in the office of Edwin M. 
Turner and later with Major T. W. Walker. 
In 1 88 1, after an examination at Trenton, 
N.J., before the Supreme Court, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar as an attorney; and three 
years later he was recognized as a counsellor. 
He started in practice here in Vineland in 
1881, and has since built up a large clientage. 
While he has devoted considerable attention 
to general practice, he has made a specialty of 
questions relating to municipal law and 
taxes, and whatever pertains thereto. He has 
acted as solicitor for the borough of Vineland, 
the town of Landis, and the school district, 
and at the present time is serving all three in 
that capacity. He was interested as an attor- 
ney for one of the parties during the settle- 
ment of the question as to whether women 
should be allowed to vote for school trustees, 
and he has usually had a leading jiart on one 
side or the other in all the important cases 



2s6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tried in this community during the past ten 
years. 

Mr. Tullcr has always been an active sup- 
porter of the Republican party and a leader 
in local affairs. He has served on the Cum- 
berland County Executive Committee of his 
party, and has been a delegate in different 
iState conventions. In 1883, when about 
twenty-three years of age, he was elected to 
the office of Township Collector, the duties of 
which he fulfilled in a creditable manner. He 
is Past Master of Vineland Masonic Lodge, 
No. 69; a member of the Masonic Grand 
Lodge of the State; of Eureka Chapter of 
Vineland; of Olivet Commandery, Knights 
Templars, of Millville, which he represented 
at the triennial conclaves held in Washing- 
ton and Boston; and of LuLu Temple, Order 
of the Mystic Shrine, of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Tuller attends and supports the Sweden- 
borgian church. 




APTAIN SILAS ROBBINSO^f, a 



well-known resident of Dividing 
Creek, engaged in oyster fishing, 
was born here, November 18, 1844, son of 
William and Mary (Glenn) Robbinson. His 
father, who was born at Port Norris, this 
county, in 1807, acquired his education in the 
public schools of that town. While yet quite 
young he engaged in the business of transport- 
ing freight from Maurice River to the city of 
Philadelphia in a wood shallop. In early 
manhood he was appointed to the captaincy of 
the vessel on which he sailed and of which 



he was a part owner. He followed that call- 
ing until about two years prior to his decease, 
when on account of declining health he aban- 
doned it. He wedded Miss Mary Glenn, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Glenn, the 
former of whom was engaged in carpentering 
at Philadelphia. Her grandfather, John 
Glenn, spent his adult life in oystering. 
William Robbinson and his wife had eight 
children, of whom five are still living; 
namely, Elizabeth, Mary, William Glenn, 
Silas, and Eliza K. Elizabeth, who now re- 
sides at Dividing Creek, is the widow of 
Philip Clark; Mary successively married 
Charles Sloane, of Philadelphia, and Philip 
Baker, who died about 18S8; and Eliza K. be- 
came the wife of William Gandy, an oyster- 
man of Dividing Creek. The father died in 
1855, in his forty-eighth year; and his wife, 
who belonged to the Baptist Church of Divid- 
ing Creek, departed this life December 23, 
1878, in her sixty-seventh year. 

Captain Silas Robbinson was educated in 
the common schools of his native town. In 
his eleventh year he engaged as cook on an 
oyster boat at three dollars a month. When 
he was about twenty years of age he took 
charge of an oyster boat, and he has been sail- 
ing boats in the oyster business to the jiresent 
time. On March 5, 1866, Captain Robbinson 
was united in marriage with Miss Minerva 
Blizzard, who was bcn'n at Downs, N.J., July 
10, 1846, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan 
lilizzard. Her mother is still living. Her 
father, who was a general farmer of Downs, 
died when she was five years old. By her 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



257 



Captain Robbinson became the father of six 
children, namely: Alice, who died in infancy; 
Belle, who is now the wife of William Hew- 
itt, of Bridgeton, this county; Henry, who 
departed this life in 18.S9, in his twenty- 
first year; Silas, Jr.; Ula; and Walter C. 
Captain Robbinson is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd F"ellows, being a mem- 
ber of Social Lodge, No. 168, at Dividing 
Creek, of which he is Past Grand. In politics 
he supports the Prohibitionist party. He is 
a regular attendant and a liberal supporter of 
the Baptist Church of Dividing Creek, of 
which his wife is a member. 



/STeORGE W. BETCHNER, the well- 
\f^^J_ known City Collector of Bridgeton, 
was born here, December 14, i860, son of 
Jacob and Almira (Gaun) Betchner. His pa- 
ternal grandmother, Catherine Betchner, after 
attaining the remarkable age of one hundred 
years, passed away at Philadelphia in Septem- 
ber, 1893. 

Jacob Betchner was born in Philadelphia in 
1835. His parents were very poor, and he 
only received about six weeks' schooling in 
his life. When eight or nine years of age he 
was apprenticed to a man in Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania, who was a farmer and a carpen- 
ter. He was cruelly treated by this man, but 
according to the terms of the contract he was 
obliged to remain during his minority. In 
1856 he came to Bridgeton, and worked as a 
carpenter journeyman on Trinity Church. 
Shortly after he formed a copartnership with 



Robert S. Carll, and under the style of Carll 
& Betchner did a very flourishing business. 
The partnership lasted until Jacob Betchner's 
tragic death on Eebruary 18, 1870. During a 
violent gale, while he was directing, from the 
opposite side of the street, the removal of 
scaffolding from the cupola of the Baptist 
chapel, a board that had been carried off by 
the wind struck Mr. Betchner between the 
eyes, crushing his jaw bones, and severing the 
jugular vein. At that time the firm were 
building the South Jersey Institute, the West 
Presbyterian Church, and the Baptist Chapel 
on South Pine Street. Jacob Betchner was 
Vice-President of the Young Men's Christian 
Association; a member of Brearly Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. ; of Cumberland Lodge, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows; and of Ca- 
lantha Lodge, Knights of Pythias. He was 
sympathetic and benevolent, and no one who 
went to him in need ever went away empty- 
handed. He married Miss Almira, daugiiter 
of John Gaun, of Philadelphia, and became 
the father of five children — Winfield Scott, 
George W., Kate E., Charles E., and John G. 
Kate E. is the wife of David Jones. The par- 
ents were members of the Metiiodist Plpis- 
copal church, in which the father was class 
leader and superintendent of the Sunday- 
school for many years. 

George W. Betchner, after completing his 
education in the Bridgeton public schools, 
learned the trade of cigar-maker. In 1S84 he 
established himself in business as a manufact- 
urer and wholesale and retail dealer in cigars. 
This enterprise was successfull)' managed by 



2SS 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



him for ten years, though for two years of the 
time he was unable, on account of his health, 
to give it his personal attention. During that 
time he was employed by the post-ofifice de- 
partment as letter-carrier. Since his election 
to the office of City Collector, Mr. BetcJiner 
has done a large insurance business, also deal- 
ing extensively in real estate. He served on 
the County Executive Committee, and on the 
City Committee for one year. By popular 
vote he was elected Collector of Taxes for 
three years, on March 13, 1873, being then 
younger than any of his predecessors in the 
office. He is very active in the ranks of the 
Democratic party, and has represented his 
ward as delegate to several conventions, over 
which he has frecjuently ]3resided. On March 
lO, 1896, he was re-elected City Collector, 
and in the following July he represented the 
First Congressional District of the State in 
the national convention of his party held in 
Chicago. Mr. Betchner is a member of the 
Hoard of Trade and the Knights of Malta; 
f)f Progressive Castle, No. 64, Knights of 
Golden Eagle, of which he is Past Chief; 
and of Welcome Council, Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics, being Past Coun- 
cillor. 

On May i, 1883, he was married to Lola, 
daughter of Abram R. Garrison, of Bridgeton. 
They have now one child. Alberta May. Both 
parents support the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which Mrs. Betchner is a member. 
Mr. Betchner is a worthy son of an honored 
father, many of whose admirable characteris- 
tics he inherits. 



"CJVAN ROWLAND WHITE, one of the 
J Q[ partners of the Pearl Button Novelty 
Company of Vinelajid, was born November 29, 
1852, in St. George, Grenada, W.I., son of 
William Rowland and Harriet (Primmer) 
White. William Rowland White is a native 
of Portsmouth, England, born March 17, 
1826. After availing himself of the usual ed- 
ucational facilities his native place afforded, 
he learned the trade of a blacksmith, which 
he followed in Portsmouth until he was 
twenty-two years of age. He then went to St. 
George, where he conducted quite an exten- 
sive blacksmithing business on his own ac- 
count, employing five men on an average. In 
i860 he went to New York City, but returned 
to St. George three months later, leaving his 
family to follow him a year later. In 1864 he 
again moved to New York, wlience after a 
brief stay he came to Vineland, and pur- 
chased a farm, which he carried on for three 
or four years. On leaving there he returned 
to the West Indies, making a short stay in 
Jamaica. He then went to Vallejo, Cal., ami 
vifas there engaged at his trade for three years. 
At the expiration of that time he retLwned 
East to Philadelphia, where his family had 
settled in 1869. Seven years later he again 
settled in Vineland, and carried on a farm for 
more than two years. In December, 1880, he 
started what is now known as White's Variety 
Store. This venture was quite successful. 
He still conducts the place, and is doing a 
thriving business. His wife, Harriet, a 
daughter of Kichai'd I'riinmei', of Portsmouth, 
England, has borne -her husband five children. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2S9 



of whom the only survivor is I^van Rowland. 
She is a communicant of the Episcopal 
church. 

Evan Rowland White received his education 
in the schools of St. George, New York City, 
and Vineland. After he left school he was 
employed in the pearl button factory of David 
James, of Vineland, for three years, during 
which time he acquired a thorough knowledge 
of the business, lie then went to Philadel- 
pliia, where he followed his trade about two 
years ; and then on account of impaired 
health he gave up that business, and engaged 
in farming. The change proving beneficial, 
in two years he was able to resume his old oc- 
cupation, which he followed up to 1S73, when 
he once more made a change by going into the 
grocery business. However, after two years 
he returned to his trade, and worked at it in 
Vineland until 1890. In this year he began 
in a small way to manufacture a general line 
of j)earl buttons. The business steadily in- 
creased until in 1893 he was turning out one 
thousand gross of buttons per week. At the 
beginning of the panic in 1893 he deemed it 
prudent to shut down his factory, and did not 
start it up again for a year. In the fall of 
1894 the Pearl ]5utton Novelty Company was 
formed, of which Mr. White is a member and 
the business manager. The factory was turn- 
ing out two thousand gross of buttons weekly, 
and employed twenty-five people at the open- 
ing of the year 1896. 

On October 39, 1873, Mr. White was mar- 
ried to Miss Emily Dawson, a daughter of 
William Dawson, of Vineland. She was born 



in London, luigland, on May 26, 1852. Of 
the seven children born to them one is de- 
ceased. The others are : William R., ICleanor 
M., Hari'iet E., Charles E., limily !•;., and 
Annie Primmer. Mr. White was appointed to 
the office of Department Factory Inspector by 
Governor Green, under the direction of L. T. 
F"ell, Chief Inspector of Orange, N.J. lie 
was appointed a member of the Board of 
Health by the Common Council, but resigned 
shortly after. He is Past Sachem of Muskee 
Tribe, No. 125, Improved Order of Red Men, 
and has connection with the Pocahontas 
Branch of the order. He has also affiliation 
with a commandery of the Knights of Malta 
and the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. He 
and Mrs. White are members of tlie Epis- 
copal church, in which he has served as V^estry- 
man and secretary. 



Tt^^ICMARD HEWITT, Jr., extensively 
I r^ engaged in market gardening and the 
Vi— ^ florist's business at South Vineland, 
was born in Wiconisco, Dauphin County, 
Pa., May 19, 1859, son of Richard and /ilia 
(Davis) Hewitt. His grandfather, William 
Hewitt, who was a native of Bradford, York- 
shire, England, resided for the greater part of 
his life in Oldham, Lancashire, engaged in 
coal mining. William came to the United 
States twice to visit his son. He died in 
England. 

Richaril Hewitt, Sr., was born at Oldham, 
January 25, 1825. In 1852, soon after his 
marriage, he left his iiome in England to come 



zCo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



to America. On his arrival he settled in 
Pennsylvania, where he was successfully en- 
gaged in coal mining for many years. He 
afterward came to Landis township, where in 
1867 he purchased a farm situated about two 
miles east of South Vincland, and engaged in 
fruit raising and general farming. In 1888 
he sold this farm, and purchased his present 
])lace of twenty acres, near South Vineland 
station. His wife, Zilla, also a native of 
Lancashire, England, has borne him nine 
children, of whom one died in infancy, and 
William Frank at the age of twenty-eight 
years. Those living are: John D., of Bram- 
well, Mercer County, W. \^a. ; James, of Cam- 
den, N.J.; Elizabeth, the widow of George 
Grau, residing at Philadelphia; Richard, Jr., 
the subject of this sketch; Anna R., of New 
York City; Emma, the wife of S. P. Ash, of 
South Vincland; and Zilla, living at home. 
Both parents are members of the Episcopal 
church. 

Richard Hewitt, Jr., acquired a good 
knowledge of the subjects taught in the pub- 
lic schools of Landis. On leaving school he 
remained at home, and assisted his father in 
the work of the farm. After attaining his 
majority, he became interested in greenhouse 
work, and started in that business with a small 
hot bed of twelve sashes, raising lettuce, rad- 
ishes, and vegetables for the winter market. 
In the second year he had a hot-bed of twice 
the size, and in the third year he had a small 
house of eighty-one sashes. His business 
continued to increase so that in the following 
year he hail two hundred and twenty-eight 



sashes and in the ne.xt year double that 
amount. Up to 1888 he conducted the busi- 
ness on his father's farm east of South Vine- 
land, and was assisted by him in the work. 
In time it became desirable to have the busi- 
ness nearer the railroad; and they purchased 
their present place, near the South Vineland 
station. On taking possession, they erected 
a greenhouse of six hundred and forty-four 
sashes. In the succeeding year Mr. Hewitt 
built a new house, and still another two years 
later, so that at the present time he has an 
area of twenty-seven thousand, four hundred 
and twenty square feet devoted to forced cult- 
ure. He still gives his attention principally 
to raising winter vegetables, lettuce, radishes, 
and cauliflowers. The greenhouses are pro- 
vided with steam heat, and a heater for warm- 
ing the water in cold weather. It is now the 
largest establishment of the kind in the 
county, and its work is carried on all the year 
round. Its proprietors also raise peaches and 
other fruits. 

On November 18, 1883, Richard Hewitt, 
Jr., was united in marriage with Miss Ella 
M. Steele, who was born in Elizabeth, N.J., 
daughter of Thomas B. and Margaret S. 
(Crane) Steele. Her father, a native of Lee, 
Berkshire County, Mass., is now one of the 
leading attorne)S of Vincland. Her mother, 
who was born in Roselle, N.J., died in 1877. 
Mrs. Hewitt, having been a child when iier 
parents brought her to Vineland, receivetl her 
education in the schools of this town. She 
has borne her husband two daughters — Annie 
Laura and Maud Elizabeth. Mr. Hewitt has 



I 




CHARLES RICHMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^63 



always been a faithful supporter of the Repub- 
lican party. In 1894 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Committee for Lanilis township. 
He is a member of \'inelan(l Lodge, No. 62, 
A. F. & A. M. ; also of Eureka Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons, of which he is High 
Priest, and consequently a representative to 
the Grand Lodge. He and Mrs. Hewitt at- 
tend and support the Episcopal church. 



d" 



HARLES RICHMAN is a prominent 
citizen and one of the leading farmers 
of Hopewell township, N.J. , where 
he has a fine farm of about one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, two miles from the cen- 
tre of Bridgeton. He was born in Sharps- 
town, Salem County, N.J., in 1853, son of 
Isaiah W. and Sarah (Peak) Richman. 

Isaiah W. Richman was born in Salem 
County in IMay, 1823, and was a representa- 
tive man, who held many important offices. 
In 1882 he removed from the farm now occu- 
pied by his son to West Avenue, Bridgeton, 
there remaining until his death three years 
later. He married Miss Peak, of Sharkstown, 
and they had three children — Morris P., who 
died at the age of twenty-two; Charles; and 
Lydia, Mrs. W. H. H. Elwell, of Bridgeton. 
Sarah P. Richman, the mother, died in 1861, 
at the age of about forty-two years. 

Charles Richman, after acquiring his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Shiloh, con- 
tinued on the farm with his father until his 
marriage. He then moved to Stoe Creek, 
remaining two years. Upon his father's 



retirement he returned to the home farm, 
which he bought after his father's death. He 
carries on general farming, raising hay, grain, 
and other produce, and of late has become in- 
terested in the sale of milk. Mr. Richman 
thinks a great deal of a good horse. He owns 
standard-bred colts of Hambletonian and Bel- 
mont stock, and his cattle are good grade 
stock. In company with a friend he has spec- 
ulated some in live stock, shipping carloads of 
cows from New York State to sell. He is a 
stockholder in the Montecule Packing Com- 
pany of See ley, N.J. 

Mr. Richman has always been active in the 
ranks of the Democratic party, especially in 
township affairs. He held the office of In- 
spector of Elections for two or three years, 
and since the adoption of the new law he has 
been appointed on the Board of Registry for 
three years. In April, 1894, he was chosen 
Freeholder to serve one year of an unexpired 
term ; and the ne.xt year he was elected on the 
Union ticket to succeed himself for a full 
term of three years, although the first year 
was contested. Mr. Richman's name is on 
the membership rolls of the following social 
organizations: Cohansey Lodge, No. 205, of 
Bridgeton; Good Intent Flncampment, No. 
1 5 ; and also of Ahwahneeta Tribe, No. 97, 
Improved Order of Red Men. 

He married Miss Mary Dare, daughter of 
Isaac B. Dare, who lived in Bridgeton. They 
have no children. Mr. and Mrs. Richman 
are members of the West Presbyterian Church 
of the city. They own a fine house, which 
was erected by Mr. Richman's father. 



264 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




iLLiAM fralp:y GLACKIN, 

who was Postmaster of South Vine- 
land under the last three administrations until 
March, 1896, was born March 7, 1849, at 
German town, Pa., son of Isaac and Sarah 
(Fraley) Glackin. Isaac Glackin, also a na- 
tive of Germantown, was born in the year 
1807. Early in life he learned the trade of a 
stone mason, at which he was successfully en- 
gaged throughout his life. He died in Janu- 
ary, 1859, at Germantown, where his whole 
life was spent. His wife, Sarah, bore him 
four children, of whom the survivors are: 
Susanna, the wife of Charles S. Johnson, of 
Philadelphia; and William Fraley, the sub- 
ject of this sketch. The mother, who was a 
communicant of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, died in 1892, eighty-five years of age. 
William Fraley Glackin completed his 
school education in the Germantown Acad- 
emy, one of the oldest educational institutions 
in America. He then went to work as clerk 
in the wholesale dry-goods house of John II. 
Ihown & Co., of Philadelphia, and subse- 
quently served in the same capacity their 
successors, Garrettson, Blakemore & Co. 
Soon after reaching his majority he went into 
a general mercantile business on his own ac- 
count on York Road. He did a thriving busi- 
ness there for several years, after which he 
came to South Jersey, and engaged in general 
farming in the town of Landis. He had been 
occupied in this way eight years when, in 
1886, he was appointed agent of the West 
Jersey Railroad, whose duties included those 
of a passenger, freight, and express agent. 



He then came to South Vineland to live, jnir- 
chasing about the same time an interest in the 
general store of A. S. Whittien & Co., that 
afterward proved a profitable investment. 

On October 3, 1870, Mr. Glackin was mar- 
ried to Miss Mercy A. Medwary, of Philadel- 
phia, a daughter of Bennett Medwary. Of 
their four children Edith died when but three 
and a half years old. The others arc: Roger, 
Sarah, and Kittie. Roger is employed as 
telegraph operator by the West Jersey Rail- 
road. The father died March 22, 1896, aged 
forty-seven years. While at York Road he 
was for si.\ years Director of the Port, an elec- 
tive office. Under President Cleveland's first 
administration he was appointed Postmaster of 
South Vineland, and was successively reap- 
pointed under President Harrison and Presi- 
dent Cleveland, proving himself a faithful and 
popular official. He was a Mason of Vine- 
land Lodge, No. 69, and Eureka Chapter, and 
a member of the Order of the Knights of 
Malta. He was a communicant of the h^jiis- 
cojxal cluirch, of which Mrs. Glackin is and 
has been a member. 



■I':nrv whiteley elmp:r, m.d., 

^^ a prominent physician of Bridgeton, 
was born here, April 26, 1847, son 
of William IClmer, M.D., and Eliza (Robeson) 
Elmer. His earliest-known ancestor was 
Daniel Elmer (second). (See the sketch of 
his life elsewhere in this work.) Jonathan 
Elmer, M.D., son of Daniel (second) and the 
great-grandfather of Henry Whiteley, was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



265 



born November 29, 1745, in Cedarvillc, this 
county, and died September 3, 1S17, in 
Bridgeton. He was graduated in 176S, vvitli 
the first class from the medical de[)artment of 
Pennsylvania University, and was one of the 
most distinguished men of his time, receiving 
the highest honors in church and State. In 
1774 he was a delegate to the Provincial Con- 
gress. In 1775 he was commissioned Major 
of the Light Infantry. From 1776 to 1788 he 
was a member of the Continental Congress, 
from 1780 to 1784 a member of the New 
Jersey Legislative Council, and from 1789 to 
1791 United States Senator. He was also 
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, a mem- 
ber of the American Philosophical Society, 
and the Ruling Elder of the Presbyterian 
church. In 1769 he married Mary Seeley, a 
descendant of Robert Seeley, who came from 
England with Governor Winthrop. William 
Elmer, M.D., a son of Jonathan and the 
grandfather of the subject of this notice, was 
a native of Bridgeton, born March 23, 178S. 
He was graduated from the medical depart- 
ment of Pennsylvania Unixersity in 181 1. 
On April 2, 181 2, he was married to Nancy 
Blakesley Potter, a daughter of Colonel David 
Potter, a distinguished soldier of the Revolu- 
tionary War. (See sketch of Colonel Will- 
iam E. Potter.) 

Dr. William Elmer, Jr., the father of 
Henry W., was born in Bridgeton. He was 
educated at Princeton College, from which he 
graduated in the class of 1832. Four years 
later he received his diploma from the medical 
department of Pennsylvania University, and 



located in Bridgeton, where he became a lead- 
ing practitioner. During the Civil War he 
was examiner of recruits. He was a meniber 
of different medical societies of Cumberland 
County anil of the State and American Asso- 
ciations. He was also one of the Directors 
of the State asylum. In the West Presby- 
terian Church he officiated as Elder and Trus- 
tee, being one of its founders. By his wife, 
Eliza (Robeson) Elmer, who came from Dela- 
ware, he became the father of six children. 
P"our of the number attained maturity, namely: 
William, who is a physician in Trenton; Mar- 
garet K., the wife of Robert Porter, of Phila- 
delphia; Henry Whiteley, the subject of this 
sketch; and Macomb K., who for a long time 
was connected with the banking house of Jay 
Cooke & Co., and died in 1877. The father 
died in 1889, and the mother in 1887. 

Henry Whiteley Elmer, M.D., after attend- 
ing the public schools for the usual period, 
went to West Jersey Academy, and duly grad- 
uated therefrom. He then entered Princeton 
College, from which he graduated in the class 
of 1866. Three years later he graduated in 
medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. 
In the same year, as the result of a competi- 
tive examination, he was appointed interne of 
Blockley Hospital, also serving in Wells Hos- 
pital. He remained in Philadelphia for a 
short time after, and then came to Bridgeton, 
where he has since been in successful practice. 
His father and he were in partnership up to a 
few years prior to his parent's death. Dr. 
Elmer had been the Secretary of the Cumber- 
land County Medical Society for twenty-four 



366 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



consecutive years, the duration of his member- 
ship, when at the last meetin"; he declined to 
serve longer. He is also a member of the 
New Jersey State Medical Society, which he 
now serves as Chairman of the Standing Com- 
mittee. He likewise belongs to the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and to the Pan- 
American Society as a representative from 
this State. Dr. Elmer is a Director of the 
Cumberland National Bank and the Secretary 
and Auditor, as well as a Director, of the 
Bridgeton Gas Light Company. He is a 
Trustee of West Jersey Academy and a mem- 
ber and Trustee of the West Presbyterian 
Church. He is not a politician. In his so- 
cial and professional relations he has worthily 
upheld the family name. 



(^OHN G.' LEWELLEN, the efficient 
Postmaster at Dcerficld Street, New 
Jersey, was born on a farm in Deerfield 
township, about a mile and a half from the 
village, April 20, 1S65. He is a son of John 
S. and Hannah A. (Matlack) Lewellen and a 
grandson of Reuben Lewellen, a farmer who 
lived near Marlton, N.J. John S. Lewellen 
was born in Marlton in 1818, antl was reared 
in that town. In his early manhood he di- 
vided his time between teaching and the man- 
agement of a general store. When he married 
he sold the store and purchased the farm in 
Deerfield on which his son was born. In 
1872 he moved from this farm to Deerfield 
Street, where he spent the rest of his life re- 
tired from active work, dying September 23, 



1890. He was a prominent citizen, and held 
a number of town offices. His wife, who is 
yet living, is a daughter of Simeon Matlack, 
an old resident of Marlton. Nine children 
were liorn to Mr. and Mrs. Lewellen, namely: 
Sally, wife of Henry K. DuBois, of Pal- 
atine, N.J., Lizzie, wife of George B. 
Cobb, of Deerfield Street; Anna, wife of Joel 
DuBois, who lives near Palatine; Minnie, 
now deceased, who married Albert Fox; 
Elma, wife of F. E. Moore, of Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Lida, wife of Harry J. Garrison; 
Henry, a clergyman of Lafayette, Ind. ; John 
G., the subject of this sketch; antl Amos, who 
resides in the State of Nebraska. 

John G. Lewellen, after receiving a public- 
school education, learned the wheelwright's 
trade with his brother-in-law, Mr. Cobb, and 
worked at it some seven years, or until the 
death of his father. Shortly after that event 
he purchased a general store in Deerfield 
Street, which, under his management has be- 
come the leading store of the place. Here he 
has conducted a successful business for si.x 
years, his trade steadily increasing; and he 
has been an active factor in developing other 
business enterprises in the town. He helped 
to organize the local branch of the Mutual 
State Building and Loan Association, and has 
been its Treasurer since it was incorporated. 
A Democrat in politics, he was elected to the 
office of Township Clerk three years in succes- 
sion, and was appointed Postmaster in Octo- 
ber, 1894, a position which he now holds. 
He is a member and at present Treasurer of 
the Brotherhood's Union. In December, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



267 



i8Sg, Mr. Levvellen was mnrried to Miss 
Ilcttic Surran, daughter of Charles M. 
Surran, of Elmer: and two promising cliildren 
have come to brighten their home — Alson and 
Charles. 



^s^ONATHAN EDWARDS COSMAN, 
an enterprising and successful agricult- 
urist and fruit grower of Landis, was 
born August 26, 1839, i" Newburg, Orange 
County, N. Y., son of Jonathan and Hannah 
Elizabeth (Lewis) Cosman. He represents an 
old and respected family of Newburg. His 
grandfather, Jonathan Cosman, who was born 
in Newburg, November 14, 1760, and received 
iiis education in the schools of his native 
town, devoted his entire subsequent life in 
that place to the pursuit of general husbandry. 
His wife, Hannah, made him the father of 
eleven children, namely: James, born Feb- 
ruary 24, 1 781; Phiebe, born September 7, 
1783: Elizabeth, born July 7, 1785; Bar- 
bara, born June 6, 1787; Hannah, born Sep- 
tember I, 1789; Henry, born January 9, 1791; 
Rachel, born April 19, 1793; Jonathan, born 
March 10, 1798; Sally, born July 18, 1800; 
Samuel W., born March 16, 1804; and Maria, 
born July 21, 1808. 

Jonathan Cosman, the father of the subject 
of this sketch, was a native of Newburg. He 
received his education in the common schools, 
and followed farming as his chief occupation. 
He resided at the old homestead until within 
eight or nine years of his decease, when he re- 
moved to another estate in the vicinity, on 
which he remained for the rest of his life. 



On September 13, 1830, he was joined in 
matrimony with Miss Elizabeth Lewis, daugh- 
ter of Enoch Lewis, of Milton, Ulster County, 
N.Y., and his children were: Hannah Maria, 
commonly called Annie, who was born July 

24, 1837, and became the wife of Charles 
Sprague, of New York City; Jonathan Ed- 
wards, the subject of this sketch: William 
Henry, Vv-ho was born May 24, 1840, and died 
in 1862; Mary Elizabeth, born March 29, 
1842, who was married to John Gardiner, of 
Newburg, N.Y. : Ruth Amanda, born Decem- 
ber 25, 1843, who died in 1894, the wife of 
John Ackerman, of Bergen County, New 
Jersey; and Cornelius Lewis, born November 

25, 1845. Ill religious belief a Presbyterian, 
the father was affiliated with the church of that 
denomination in Newburg, which he served in 
the capacity of Deacon. His decease occurred 
June 15, 1S47. 

Jonathan Edwards Cosmiin was educated in 
the common schools of Newburg. He re- 
mained under the paternal roof-tree until 1864, 
when he removed to his present farm in Vine- 
land, Landis township, purchased by him in 
the preceding year. On his estate, which 
comprises fifty-four acres, he makes a specialty 
of raising potatoes and fruit. Thirty acres 
are devoted to pears and peaches. The gen- 
eral appearance of his property indicates thrift, 
industry, and prosperity. In 1884 he erected 
his present fine residence on the site of the 
original dwelling. 

On September 2, 1863, Mr. Cosman mar- 
ried Miss Catherine W. Rowe, a daughter of 
Mr. John and Ann Eliza Rowe, of Ulster 



268 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



County, New York. Her maternal grand- 
father was Samuel Wallace, of Ulster County. 
Her parents, born respectively on March 8, 
1812, and December 17, 181 1, were married 
September 2, 1835. They had eleven chil- 
dren, seven of whom grew to maturity, 
namely: Mary E., born August 17, 1840, 
who became the wife of Theodore Campbell; 
Catherine W., born April 11, 1843, now Mrs. 
Cosman ; Thomas, born December 29, 1 844 ; 
Emma, born July 28, 1S47; Evanna, born 
September 17, 1849, who died February 22, 
1886; Susan Eleanor, who died July 16, 
1882, aged twenty-eight years; and Mar- 
garet, born August 17, 1856, who was mar- 
ried to William Bookstaver, of Orange 
County, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Rowe 
were both members of the Dutch Reformed 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Cosman have had 
three children, two of whom survive, namely: 
Liberty A., who is the wife of Walter H. 
]-:ilis, of Vineland; and May A. Mr. Cos- 
man is a member of the Vineland Grange; 
and ill religious belief all his family are Pres- 
byterians and in fellowship with the church 
of that persuasion in Vineland. 



^^•^> 



T^LEMENT WATERS SHOEMAKER, 
I Jl tile prii[)riet()r of the Bridgeton Iron 

^*^ ^ Works and Treasurer of the Cum- 
berland Glass Company, was born in Elsin- 
boro township, Salem County, N.J., on April 
23, 1848. Mis parents were Hiram and Sarah 
(Waters) Shoemaker. George -Shoemaker, his 
great-grandfather, a Hollander by birth, was 



the first representative of the family in this 
country. He was a man of prominence in 
Deerfield township. His son, George, Jr., 
the grandfather of Clement W., was born in 
the same township, but afterward moved to 
Salem County, and still later to Ohio, where 
he died. 

Hiram Shoemaker, son of George, Jr., was 
born in 181 5 in Mannington township, Salem 
County, and there came to maturity. He en- 
gaged in tilling the soil and also in dealing 
in live stock and poultry, spending his life, 
with the exception of two years of pioneering 
in Ohio, in Mannington, Salem, and Elsin- 
boro, in Salem County. He married Miss 
Waters, daughter of Clement Waters, a farmer 
and native of Salem County, wiio subsequently 
moved to Texas and died. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hiram Shoemaker had eighteen children, of 
whom sixteen reached maturity. Eleven of 
this number arc now living, namely: Amanda 
L., the wife of John N. Miller, in I-'airton, 
N.J.; Margaret, who married W. H. Harri- 
son, of Moore, Pa.; William H., a resident of 
Camden, N.J. ; Clement Waters, of Bridge- 
ton; Missouri H., wife of Thomas H. Bo wen, 
a prominent jeweller of Bridgeton; Louisiana, 
a twin sister of the preceding, became the wife 
of Jacob Harris, of Cinnaminson, N.J. ; Hiram 
J., of this city; Charles H., President of 
Clark Window Glass Company of 15ridgeton ; 
Laura H., the wife of John M. Davidson, also 
of this city; Robert Elmer, President of the 
Cumberland Glass Company of Bridgeton; 
and Joanna, wife of the lion. George O. 
Whitney, of Hamilton, Bermuda. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



269 



mother died at the age of forty-one, and the 
father in February, 1895. It is a remarkable 
fact in the history of so large a family that 
but one death has occurred in thirty-five 
years. 

Clement W. Shoemaker attended school in 
the towns of Mannington and Elsinboro, and 
also went to the Quaker school in Salem; but 
his educational advantages were not extensive. 
At the age of seventeen he came to Bridgeton, 
and went into the store of H. B. -Shoemaker, 
a distant kinsman. Mr. Shoemaker kept a 
store of general merchandise, and there the 
farmer's son gained his first knowledge of 
business. When he attained his majority, 
having saved a little money, he went to Pen- 
nington Seminary for six months, intending 
to fit himself for college, and loaning his 
money to be kept until he should need it to 
pay his expenses. Unfortunately the borrower 
failed, obliging Clement to leave school, and 
go on the farm to get another start. While 
on the farm his (}U1 employer offered him a 
good salary if he would return to the store, but 
he was unwilling to break his contract to 
work. Finally, being offered one-third inter- 
est in the business, he accepted after being re- 
leased, going in on borrowed capital. There 
he remained six years, coming out at the end 
of the time with one thousand dollars in cash. 
He then entered the employ of Mr. E. M. 
Ware for one year, at a salary of twelve dollars 
a week. Deciding at the expiration of the 
year to go into business for himself, he bought 
out his old employer, Mr. H. B. Shoemaker, 
and intrmlucetl the cash system in Bridgeton, 



making a success of it. The first week he 
sold one hundred and forty-six dollars' worth 
of goods, and he continued driving his busi- 
ness to such an extent that he sold forty thou- 
sand dollars" worth of goods during the year. 
After managing this business two years alone, 
he went into the glass business, establishing a 
new plant with Joseph A. Clark, Isaac L. 
Clark, and S. M. Bassett. Mr. .Shoemaker 
paid off his indebtedness the first year, and 
started his brother Charles in a store in Phil- 
adelphia. He continued to run the store in 
addition to the glass business for one year, 
when he took in his brother Elmer and Will- 
iam E. Cox for one year. He then gave his 
brother Palmer one-half interest in that enter- 
prise, Mr. W. E. Cox retiring; and they ran 
the store together successfully for one year, at 
the end of which time Mr. Shoemaker sold his 
interest to his nephew, J. Warren Miller, giv- 
ing his own time exclusively to the glass in- 
terest. After the first year this flourishing 
company were located on the wharf, near Cox 
& Sons; but they were burned out. Wishing 
to provide amply for the growth of the plant, 
they went out on Laurel Street, above Laurel 
Hill, buying a large tract of land of Charles 
E. Grosscup and Rachel Whitaker, building 
thereon a fine plant. 

The firm then began the manufacture of 
rough plate glass for floors and sky-lights, to- 
gether with bottles and window glass, but 
afterward dropped the rough glass department. 
The Cumberland Glass Company now make 
bottles, fruit and battery jars, and window 
glass, giving employment to over five hundred 



270 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



persons, having a weekly pay-roll of four 
thousand dollars. They manufacture for one 
coneern over six million bottles per year. 
The paid-in capital of the Cumberland Glass 
Company is one hundred and fifty-six thousand 
dollars. It is next to the largest glass cor- 
poration in the State. 

These fine results have not been attained 
without friction. The company has had three 
contests with the Union Labor Organization, 
neither on account of hours nor wages, but on 
being denied the privilege of teaching a boy 
the business in their own jslant. In each con- 
flict, however, they have come out victorious, 
[jroving that they could employ whom they 
would. In 1887 Mr. Shoemaker organized 
the Clark Window Glass Company, with a 
capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars, 
for the manufacture of window glass, building 
on adjoining ground. This enterprise em- 
ploys about seventy-five hands, and their 
yearly output is thirty-two thousand boxes of 
glass. Mr. Shoemaker was also the organizer 
of the Britlgeton Iron Works, of which he is 
now the sole owner. In the foundry light and 
heavy machine castings are made, and in the 
machine shop fences and railings, employing 
a working force of thirty-five men and boys. 
For three years he was connected with the 
Crickler Machine Works, but recently sold 
out. Mr. Shoemaker is a stockholder in both 
banks, and in the Trust Company recently 
organized, and has been President of the Law 
and Order Society for one year, doing much to 
purify the city from speak-easies, gambling, 
and other evils, and their resorts. At one 



time he was a member of the School Board. 
The Shoemaker family are Methodists: and he 
has been largely identified with the various 
interests of that denomination in the city. 
State, and country. For twenty-eight years 
he has superintended the primary department 
of the Sunday-school of the Central Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He is class leader, an e.\- 
President of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and President of the Bridgeton branch 
of State Charities Aid Association, and mem- 
ber of State Executive Committee of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, also a 
member of the Executive Committee of the 
Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor 
of the State. He is a member of the Board 
of Trustees of Pennington Seminary, and also . 
Trustee of Dickinson College of Carlisle, Pa. 
Mr. Shoemaker is a member and Director of 
the Preachers' Aid Society of New Jersey 
Conference, and a representative of the New 
Jersey Conference to the General Conference 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has 
been earnestly active in the building of the 
new Fourth Central Methodist Episcopal, the 
Wesley Memorial, and the P^ast Bridgeton 
churches. While he has spent his time and 
money for the good of the churches, it has also 
been a pleasure to help any kind of philan- 
thropic work. When Mr. Shoemaker first 
came to Bridgeton he taught in the mission 
night school, conducted by Mrs. Mary I'ithian, 
coming in contact with many poor [leople. 
He resolved that if it were ever possible to 
start a manufactory of some kind to enable 
these people to help themselves he would do 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27t 



it. In the day of his prosperity he has faith- 
fully remembered the injunction that "unto 
whomsoever much is given, of him shall be 
much required." 

Mr. Shoemaker was married on May 26, 
i<S8o, to Rebecca E. Clark, daughter of Jo- 
seph A. Clark of this city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shoemaker have three children — Joseph 
Clark, Isaac Clark, and Mary Erety. Such a 
life as Mr. Shoemaker's exerts an untold 
power of good in any community. No life is 
a failure which bases business sagacity on 
moral steadfastness. 




AKON LEWIS CHAMBERLIN, of 
Vineland, the representative of the 
Sonoma Wine and 15randy Company 
of Stockton, Ca!., with headquarters in Brook- 
lyn, N.Y., was born in Lewisburg, Pa., 
March i, 1825, son of Aaron and F^lizabeth 
(Dale) Chamberlin. His grandfather, Will- 
iam Chamberlin, born September 25, 1736, 
was a prosperous miller in Ilunterilon County, 
New Jersey. In 1776, during the struggle for 
American independence, William Chamber- 
lin's mill was burned by the British. They 
also pressed his team and colored man into 
their service. It is told of the colored man 
that he did not lose control of his wits tin that 
occasion, although to appearances he did of 
his horses. The team was [daced in the rear, 
and the wagon loaded with ammunition. The 
horses kept rearing and apparently were be- 
coming unmanageable, because, as their driver 
explained, they were behind another team. 



Consequently, they were placed in front; and, 
when they reached the top of a hill, the driver 
whipped them up to their full speed, directing 
their course for his master's camp, which he 
succeeded in reaching, though bullets flew 
thick and fast around him. The store of am- 
munition was gladly received, and the color- 
man's reward was his freedom from that day. 
William Chamberlin was a Lieutenant Colo- 
nel under Colonel Chambers, and took part 
in the battle of Germantown, in wliicli his son 
Lewis was killed. He was married four 
times, his third wife being the grandmother 
of Aaron L. Chamberlin. Her maiden name 
was Margaret Park, and the year of her mar- 
riage was 17S2. She had four children, as 
follows: Uriah, born June 21, 1783; Eliza- 
beth, born May 22, 1785; Aaron, the father 
of Aaron L. ; and Rachel, born September 16, 
1789. In all, twenty-three children were 
born of William Chamberlin's four marriages. 
Aaron Chamberlin was born in Lewisburg, 
Union County, Pa., on May 24, 1787. He 
received a good district-school education, 
after which he learned the trade of a miller in 
his father's mill. He subsequently became 
the manager of the mill, and purchased the 
business shortly before his father's death. 
He continued milling in tliat vicinity until 
1S40. In the preceding year he had made a 
trip to P'reeport, Stephenson County, 111., 
where he selected a farm and built a log 
house. After closing up his business here in 
the ICast, he started from Milllinburg, Pa., 
taking his household goods on two wagons, 
and his wife with his four )'oungest children 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ill t\V(i buggies, and accomplished the journey 
to Freeport in six weeks and four days. His 
family were among the earliest settlers of 
Freeport, where he lived until his death on 
January 12, 1856. He served as County Sur- 
veyor for many years. In the War of 18 12 he 
was a Lieutenant under General Smythe, and 
was stationed at Black Rock, and shared in 
the defence of Buffalo. The organization of 
his company was kept up after the war, and he 
was subsequently elected Colonel of the regi- 
ment. He was married to Miss Elizabeth 
Dale on February 11, 181 2. She was a 
daughter of Samuel Dale who for more than 
thirty years was a member of the Pennsyl- 
vania legislature. They reared a family of ten 
children, as follows: Mary and Ann, twins, 
born March 7, 181 3, now deceased, who re- 
spectively married Francis Wilson, of LeWis- 
burg. Pa., and Lambert Van Dyke, of White 
Deer, Pa.; James Dale, born April 12, 1814; 
William, deceased, born September i, 1815; 
Samuel Dale, born January 6, 1817; Mar- 
garet, born February 19, 1S18, now the widow 
of James Barber, of Mifflinburg; Elizabeth, 
deceased, born July 27, 1819, who married 
Luther H. Bowen, of Savanna, 111. ; ICnoch, 
deceased, born April 7, 1821; Jane, deceased, 
born November 2, 1822, who married Alfred 
Goddard, of Monroe, Wis. ; and Aaron Lewis, 
the subject of this sketch. The parents at- 
tended and sujjported the Presbyterian church, 
of which the mother was a member. She tlied 
in Toledo, Ohio, August 29, 1879, ^g^f' 
eighty-nine years and twenty-four days. 

Aaron Lewis Cliamberlin received his early 



education in the district schools of White 
Deer, Pa., after which he attended the acad- 
emy at Miflflinburg. He accompanied his 
parents on their journey to Illinois, and sub- 
sequently remained with them until he was 
twenty-two years of age. At that time he 
went to Savanna, 111., where he was em- 
ployed as clerk in a general store kept by his 
brother-in-law, Luther Bowen. Mr. Bowen 
made a permanent impression on young Cham- 
berlin's mind with two useful rules, by say- 
ing: "There are two things I want you to re- 
member. I want to impress them upon you. 
Always give good weight and measure: and, 
when you receive money from any one, never 
lay it out of your hands until you have placed 
it to the proper credit." Mr. Chamberlin re- 
mained in his brother-in-law's store for three 
years, and then went to BidwelTs Bar, Butte 
County, Cal., where he kept a general mining 
and supply store on his own account. Some 
time after he started the store, which was un- 
insured, it was destroyed by fire. He at once 
rebuilt it, and continued to conduct it for the 
balance of twelve years after he first estab- 
lished himself there. He then sold out and 
removed to San P"rancisco. In that city he 
took up the business of a general merchandise 
broker, at which he was engaged for si.x years. 
In 1868 he returned to New York, and started 
a wholesale wine store, which he carried on 
for ten years. Three years later he became 
the liastern representative of the Sonoma 
Wine and Brandy Company of Stockton, Cal., 
a position that he still fills. 

Although Mr. Chamberlin was one of the 




ROBERT H. DARE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



275 



leaders in the organization of the Republican 
party in California, he declined all nomina- 
tions for office. He is a prominent Mason, 
being Past Master of Mount Moriah Lodge, 
No. 44, of San Francisco. He formerly be- 
longed to Chapter No. 20, Royal Arch 
Masons, of Oroville, Cal. He is still a mem- 
ber of Sacramento Council, Columbia Com- 
mandery, No. i, Knights Templars, and of 
New York Consistory. 



tOBERT HARRIS DARE, a succes; 
ful farmer and fruit grower of Bridge 
— ^ ton, N.J., son of David Dayton an 



success- 

;e- 

and 

Rebecca (Fithian) Dare, was born on April 4, 
1827, in that part of Bridgeton known as 
Indian F"ields. 

William Dare, third, the father of David 
Dayton, was born in the same house as his 
grandson, Robert Harris, on September 6, 
1736, being a son of William Dare, second, 
who was the son of William, first, the great- 
great-grandfather of the direct subject of the 
present sketch. Grandfather Dare, the third 
William, was a soldier in the American Revo- 
lution. On December 21, 176S, he was 
joined in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Rose, 
by whom he had seven children, as follows: 
William (fourth), Levi, Ephraim, Jonathan, 
David D., Lemuel, and Elizabeth Rose. 

David Dayton Dare was born at the family 
homestead on August 28, 1780. In his boy- 
hood he enjoyed the advantages afforded by 
the best schools of the neighborhood in his 
day, and with the e.xception of three years 



all his life was spent on the home farm. Be- 
sides engaging in general farming, he was at 
one time a buyer and seller of stock, and also 
worked at butchering, in his younger days 
having had quite a reputation as a deer hunter. 
On March 2, 1809, was solemnized his union 
with Miss Rebecca Fithian, who was a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan Fithian, of Deerfield. They 
were the parents of nine children, only one of 
whom — namely, Robert Harris — is now liv- 
ing. The others were: Jane, who married 
Ephraim E. Shcppard, of Bridgeton ; Enoch 
Fithian; Sarah, who was the wife of Benja- 
min F. Garrison; William; Ephraim, who 
died in childhood; Mar)' Hay, who married 
Captain William J. Banks; another Ephraim, 
who died at an early age; and Elizabeth Rose, 
who died in childhood. Their mother be- 
longed to the First Baptist Church, being one 
of its founders and original members. 

Robert Harris Dare was educated in the 
public schools of Bridgeton. He remained 
with his father on the farm until he was 
twenty-one years of age; and seven years 
later, in 1855, he formed a copartnership 
with Charles S. Miller and S. E. McGear, 
under the firm name of C. S. Miller & Co., 
and opened the first exclusive dry-goods store 
in Bridgeton. After they had conducted a 
successful business together for five years, Mr. 
Dare sold his interest to his partners; and 
during the succeeding four years he engaged 
in farming. About the year 1864 he estab- 
lished a grocery store here; and later on he 
went into the news and stationery business, 
being engaged in both lines for about twenty 



.76 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years. In 1886 he retired from mercantile 
business, selling out his interests to his sons, 
and has since been engaged in fruit growing 
and poultry raising. 

On September 15, 1851, he was married to 
Mrs. Emily White, a daughter of Amos Buzby, 
of Salem County, New Jersey. Three sons 
and three daughters are the fruit of their 
union, namely: Rebecca F., the wife of Ed- 
ward P. Bacon, of Hridgeton ; Ada Buzby, the 
wife of Robert More, Jr., of Bridgeton ; Theo- 
dore B., residing in Bridgeton; William W., 
also a resident of this place; Robert R. ; and 
Emily M., the wife of Linwood A. Wentzell. 
Mr. and Mrs. Dare are communicants of the 
First Baptist Church of Bridgeton. 




'ENRY S. ALVORD, Esq., of Vine- 
land, attorney and counsellor-at-law, 
was born December 18, 1861, in 
Torrington, Conn.,. son of Hubbell and Caro- 
line (Fowler) Alvord. His grandfather, Saul 
Alvord, who also was a lawyer by profession, 
was a native of Bolton, Conn. A graduate of 
Yale, Saul Alvord was admitted to the bar in 
Connecticut, and practised law in Hartford up 
to the time of his death. This occurred when 
he was sixty-three years of age, and was caused 
by his being thrown from a carriage. Of his 
sons Henry served as a member of the Con- 
necticut legislature; Charles was a State Sen- 
ator; and Hubbell filled a leading place 
among the manufacturers of the State. 

liubbell Alvord was born in Bolton, De- 
cember 14, 181 1. About forty years ago he 



bought a patent device for the manufacture of 
sewing machine needles, and with his brother 
founded the f^xcelsior Needle Company. 
This company, now the wealthiest of its kind 
in the States, if not in the world, has factories 
and branch offices in different parts of this 
country and Europe. Hubbell Alvord died 
January 16, 1881. His wife, Caroline, who 
was a sister of Seaman R. Fowler, of Vineland, 
died in Vineland, August 4, 1896. She was a 
member of the Vineland Presbyterian Church, 
of which her husband was Deacon. They had 
four children, two of whom are living, namely: 
Henry S., the subject of this sketch; and 
Belle, the wife of William K. Schoderer, of 
Philadelphia. Hubbell Alvord's brother is 
now the Treasurer, Secretary, and, practically 
speaking, the Manager of the Excelsior Needle 
Company. 

Henry S. Alvord was five years of age when 
his parents removed to Vineland. He there 
received his education, attending the common 
and high schools, and then taking up the study 
of law with Edwin M. Turner and Leverett 
Newcomb. He was admitted to the bar at 
Trenton during the June term of 1883, when 
only twenty-one years of age, being the young- 
est member of his class. Opening an office 
in Vineland immediately, he has since built 
up a good civil practice, and is now one of 
the leading attorneys of the city. He has ile- 
clined criminal cases from the beginning. 
When the Tradesman's Bank of Vineland was 
organized, he bought some of its stock; and 
three or four years later he was elected a Di- 
rector. He is now attorney for the bank. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



Mr. Alvord is also a Director of the Wildwood 
Beach Improvement Company. He was the 
Secretary of this company for a number of 
years, having been finally obliged to resign on 
account of the pressure of other business. 
Mr. Alvord is a loyal Republican. He was 
at one time solicitor of the borough, but is not 
an aspirant for public office. 

Mr. Alvord was first married July 12, 1S87, 
to Miss Hattie Tinker, daughter of William 
R. and Mary A. (Harris) Tinker, all origi- 
-nally of Meriden, Conn. Mrs. Alvord was 
born within a few miles of her husband's 
birthplace. She died February 21, 1894, 
leaving one child, Ruby. Her first-born, 
Grace, lived but eighteen months. Mr. 
Alvord was again married June 18, 1S96, to 
his present wife, Wirt S. (Brewer) Alvord, a 
daughter of Charles Brewer, M. D. Another 
daughter of Dr. Brewer' (Ray Brewer) was 
married at the same time to John S. Haley, 
M.D., of Vineland. The double wedding 
ceremonies took place in the Episcopal church 
of Vineland. Mr. Alvord is a member of the 
Episcopal Church of Vineland. His first wife 
was a member of the Baptist Church of Meri- 
ilen. Conn. 




HARLES D. CRICKLER, exten- 
sively engaged in the manufacture of 
glass bottle moulds at Bridgeton, 
of which place he is an honored and respected 
citizen, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., March 
28, 1859, son of F"rederick and Julia (Jen- 
kins) Crickler. Frederick Crickler, who was 
born in Germany, came of an aristocratic fam- 



ily. His father held the position as one of 
the Emperor's counsellors. When twenty-one 
years of age Frederick came to Philadelphia, 
where he conducted a German hotel. Acquir- 
ing a dislike to that business, he learned the 
trade of a pot-maker, and for many years car- 
ried on a manufacturing business in this line 
with profit, until advancing age caused him to 
retire from active occupation. He then re- 
moved to Millville, N J., and there lived until 
his death in 1874. His wife, Julia, was a 
daughter of Captain William Jenkins, a well- 
to-do and prominent commander of Hudson 
River boats. Eight children were born of 
their union. The mother died in Philadel- 
phia in 1891. Both parents were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Charles D. Crickler began at an early age 
to work in the glass factory at Millville. He 
acquired an education by attending night 
school for eleven years, paying for his tuition 
at the rate of three dollars per quarter. His 
attendance terminated with his acceptance of 
the position of blower. He was the first 
glass-house boy employed in the factory to 
learn the trade of mould manufacturing. 
After having become proficient in that branch 
of the industry, he Cdutinued to work for a 
time in Millville and later in Philadelphia. 
Finally he came to Bridgeton, where he went 
into business on his own account, and now 
gives employment to fifteen men. He occu- 
pies a large three-story building, forty by 
eighty feet in ground area. It is furnished 
with steam-powei-, and is well equipped with 
lathes, drill presses, planers, special muchin- 



27<S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ery for the manufacture of glass bottle moulds 
— in short, all the appliances needed in such a 
factory. The business extends to all parts of 
this country and Canada. Progressive and en- 
terprising, and withal scrupulously upright in 
his dealings, he has the esteem of all with 
whom he comes in touch. 



J^ENJAMIN W. SIMMS, a retired 
^^N sea caiitain of Cedarville, Cumber- 
land County, N.J., was born in 
Lower Alloway Creek, .Salem County, June 
23, 1S42, being the son of William and I^liza 
(Ayers) Simms. 

His father, William Simms, was born in 
Salem, Salem County, N.J., June 15, 181 5. 
When he was eleven years of age he was 
bound out to William Denn, of Lower Allo- 
way Creek Neck, with whom he remained and 
assisted in the vVork of the farm until he was 
twenty-one years old. He then went to New 
York City, where his brother, Ebenezer 
.Simms, resided, and with him learned the 
mason's trade, which he followctl there for two 
years. At the expiration of that time he re- 
turned to Salem County, and there pursued 
his trade until he retired from active life, 
some time in the year 1.S91. 

He married on March 17, 1838, Miss ICli/.a 
Ayers, a daughter of David Ayers, of Salem 
County, and to them were born seven chil- 
dren, namely: Lewis, who enlisted in Com- 
pany E of the Twelfth Regiment of the New 
Jersey Volunteer Infantry, and who met his 
death at Chancellorsvillc, May 8, 1862; Isaac; 



Benjamin W. ; Henrietta, who was first united 
in marriage with William Waddington, of 
Salem, and afterward became the wife of 
Charles Johnson; William; Mary Elizabeth, 
who is the wife of William Newcomb; and 
Annie Melissa, the wife of Thomas Conover. 
In religious belief and sym]5athy Mr William 
Simms is a Methodist, and is united witli the 
Methodist Church of Cedarville. His mother 
was a member of the Baptist church for sixty- 
one years. Mrs. William Simms lived to 
the advanced age of seventy-eight, and de- 
parted this life in June, 1895. 

Benjamin W. Simms, the third of the four 
sons as named above, enjoyed in his childhooti 
and youth the educational advantages offered 
by the common schools of his native town. 
After leaving school he was occupied in farm- 
ing until 1864, when he engaged in the oyster 
industry. Beginning as a ccok, he worked his 
way up until in 1873 he became master of 
the "Mary Margaret," a vessel of which he 
was part owner. He followed this occupation 
until 1895, when he retired from active life,, 
although he still holds an interest in tlie 
"Caroline H. Mears. " Mr. .Simms is the 
possessor of a farm of twenty acres ; and, 
being of an industrious temperament and not 
contented to remain idle, he gives his atten- 
tion to the culture of strawberries, which fruit 
he grows in abunilance. 

On September 3, 1S62, IMr. Simms was 
united in matrimony with Miss Anna Con- 
over, a daughter of John Conover. Their 
union has been blessed in the birth of tliree 
children, only two of whom grew to maturity. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



279 



namely: Margeretta C. , who is the wife of 
Jonathan R. Hartman; and Louisa, who is 
Mrs. Stephen D. Startsey. 

Mr. Simms is closely identified with the 
social life of the community, heing a member 
of Salome Lodge, No. 145; Welcome Friends 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 
the Order of United American Mechanics; 
and also of the Sons of Temperance. Re- 
ligiously, Mr. Simms is a Methodist, and 
affiliates with the church of that persuasion in 
Cedarville, of which he is an active member, 
serving as President of the Board of Trustees, 
steward, and class leader. He also holds the 
responsible office of Sunday-school superin- 
tendent, which he has filled with acceptability 
for eighteen years, having also previously 
served as assistant superintendent for the 
period of si.x years. Mr. Simms is a great 
reader, and takes delight in purchasing and 
l^erusing many of the interesting books that 
in these later years are being brought before 
the iHiblic. 

RGUS S. FERGUSON, an industrious 
blacksmith and wheelwright of Lees- 
burg, was born in Millville, Cum- 
berland County, N.J., on July 14, 1857. His 
parents were Thomas and Rhoda (Buzby) 
Ferguson. His paternal grandfather also 
was named Thomas. Thomas Ferguson, the 
father, received a common-school education, 
and subsequently became a teacher, which oc- 
cupation he followed for a short time. He 
resided on the home farm most of his life, 
linally inheriting it from his father. His land 




was chiefly devoted to the production of 
cereals and garden produce, though from ten 
to twenty acres were set apart for water- 
melons and cantaloupes. Mr. I'erguson always 
voted the Republican ticket, but he was not 
an active politician. I-'raternally, he was a 
member of Ariel Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of Mauricetown. He mar- 
ried Rhoda, daughter of Daniel Buzby, oi 
Buckshutem, and they had twelve children, 
nine of whom reached maturitv, namely: 
Daniel B. ; Mary, wife of Samuel Garrison, of 
Bridgeton ; Samuel S. ; Sarah B., who mar- 
ried F"rank Shepard, of Haleyville; Argus; 
Lewis M. ; Catherine (deceased); Thomas S. ; 
and Frank. The parents were faithful mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. The 
father died in i88g, at the age of sixty-six 
years. 

Argus S. Ferguson received his education 
in the schools of his native township. He 
learned the trade of blacksmith, and, as soon 
as he had finished his apprenticeship, started 
in business for himself in Heislerville, where 
he remained two years. He then came to 
Leesburg, and in 1884 began a general black- 
smithing business. He has done blacksmith- 
ing work on fifteen oyster boats, three coast- 
ing-vessels, and one shallop. About 1890 he 
started in the wheelwright and wagon builil- 
ing business, and has built a hundred wagons 
of various kinds, besides a large number of 
oyster dredges. He keeps one apprentice. 
Politically, Mr. h'erguson is a Republican. 
Fraternally, he is a member of Leesburg 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and he is Past Councillor of the Junior Order 
of the Leesburg United American Mechanics. 
Mr. Ferguson was twice married. His first 
wife was Josephine, daughter of Jonathan 
Chance, of Port Elizabeth. Two children 
were the fruit of this union — Rhoda B. -and 
Harry. The mother was a member of the 
Baptist church, and died when she was but 
twenty-two years old. For his second wife 
Mr. Ferguson married Miss Mary Cruse, 
daughter of George Cruse, of Leesburg; and 
they had one child, Leo They attend and 
help support the Methodist Episcopal church. 




I'HRIAM GARRISON AVARS, one 
of the leading farmers of Hopewell, 
where he manages a farm of one hundred and 
seventy-nine acres, was born in Roadstown, in 
this township, on March 5, 1849. His par- 
ents were Ephriam P. and Sarah (Garrison) 
Ayars, his father being born April 25, 1814, 
and his mother, May 4, 1816. Ephriam P. 
Ayars learned the trade of a blacksmith, and 
resided at Greenwich for some time, subse- 
quently moving to Roadstown. His marriage 
to Miss Garrison occurred on March 21, 1837, 
their old marriage certificate being now in the 
possession of the subject of this sketch. They 
h-iil four children — Jonathan, of whom a 
sketch appears elsewhere in this volume; 
Alphonso D., who died in 1S48, at the age of 
fi\e years; I'^ihriam G.; and Gamaliel P. 
The father died on May 20, 1889, ant! the 
niothcr on y\ugust 23, 1893. She was the 
daughter of Jonathan Thompson Garrison. 



Ephriam G. Ayars obtained his education 
in the Roadstown schools and at Shiloh Acad- 
emy. After completing his studies, he turned 
his attention to farm work, and subsec[uently 
learned the butcher's trade, carrying on that 
industry in Roadstown in partnership with 
Isaac Swing. In 1874 he engaged in farming 
in Hopewell township, near Bridgeton, where 
he lived for nineteen years, having a fine 
large farm. Mr. Ayars is the owner of some 
fine stock, both Jersey and Guernsey cattle, 
and carries on general farming and dairying. 
He also keeps eight head of good horses. He 
follows in the footsteps of his father in poli- 
tics, affiliating with the Democratic party. 
He served on the Election Board for some 
time, or until his voluntary withdrawal. He 
has also been a delegate to several conven- 
tions. Fraternally, he is a member of Co- 
hanscy Lodge, No. 205, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows: and Ahwahneeta Tribe, No. 97, 
I. O. Red Men, filling different chairs in that 
order. 



WLLIAM HENI 
known greenl 



RY ASH, a well- 
diouse gardener of 
South Vineland, was born in Philadelphia, 
October 12, 1836, son of Peter and Margaret 
(Field) Ash. The family is of German ex- 
traction. Jonathan Ash, William Henry's 
grandfather, who was boin in Alsace, or 
Lorraine, in 1777, came to this country in 
1804, and settled in Philadelphia. When 
preparations for the War of 1S12 were in 
progress, he helped to build lortificntions on 
the Delaware River, but he did not enter the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



281 



service as a soldier. He was engaged to some 
extent in farming. When about twenty-seven 
years old he was united in marriage to Mary 
Magdalene Kemper, by whom he became the 
father of twelve chiUhcn. Ten of the number 
reached maturity; namely, Peter, Michael, 
John, Jonathan, Henry, I'^lizabeth, Jacob, 
George, William, and Sebastian. Elizabeth 
became the wife of John Stroubel. The 
father died in April, 1865. 

Peter Ash, also a native of I'hiladelphia, 
was born July 19, 1805. Having received 
but a limited education, he was apprenticed 
to a butcher. When he attained his majority 
he began farming on his own account. At 
the age of thirty-two years he went to Newark, 
N.J., where he carried on a truck farm until 
1874. He then bought a farm of about forty 
acres in South Vineland, and was engaged in 
general farming for some time. He subse- 
quently made a specialty of market gardening, 
beginning with a few hot-beds. Later he 
erected a fine double greenhouse, three hun- 
dred and forty feet by twenty-two. He con- 
tinued in this business until 1S7S, when he 
sold out to his son, the subject of this sketch, 
and retired from active life. He died in Jan- 
uary, 1896. In November, 1835, he was 
united in marriage with Margaret Field, daugh- 
ter of George Field, of Ireland. His children 
were: William H., Rosanna, Mary, Jacob 
Jefferson, Salathiel Peter, and Sarah Ellen. 
Rosanna married Joseph Webb, of Newark, 
N.J.; Mary married David MacDonald, also 
of Newark; Sarah Ellen, who was the twin 
sister of Salathiel Peter, married successively 



Jonas Thompson, of Heislerville, and Jdhn 
Richards. All are members of the Episcopal 
church, in which the father served as Vestry- 
man. 

William Henry Ash, who was educated in 
the Newark public schools, remained" at home 
until after his marriage. He was engaged in 
the greenhouse business in Newark until 
1879, when he came to South Vineland. 
Since he bought his father's farm he has added 
about si.xteen thousand square feet of glass, 
making in all about twenty thousand square 
feet under glass. Mr. Ash makes a specialty 
of radishes, lettuce, cucumbers, beets, cauli- 
flower, musk-melons, and strawberries. He 
takes an active interest in politics, but is not 
an aspirant to office. On June 19, 1868, he 
was married to Mary Ann, daughter of Mr. 
Jesse Bennett, of Newark. Mr. and Mrs. Ash 
have had seven children, of whom are living: 
Jesse Bennett and Joseph Gordon. 



^AMES H. ELMER, an extensive farmer 
and stock raiser of P'airfield, is both a 
resident and native of this township, 
born August 19, 1844, a son of James E. and 
Lydia M. (Swing) Elmer. His grandfather 
also, Jonathan Elmer, was a native of Fair- 
field, being a prosperous farmer and wood 
dealer and the owner of large tracts of land 
in this town. He married Elizabeth Earl, 
daughter of Thomas Earl, also of Fairfield. 
James Earl Elmer, father of James H., was 
born in Fairfield, November 14, 1816. He 
grew to manhood upon his father's farm, and, 



282 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



after completing his studies, engaged in the 
wood business, first transporting his wood to 
Philadelphia by water. After his marriage 
he settled upon his father's farm, which is 
now occupied by his son, W. B. Elmer, and 
continued to carry on the wood business. He 
bought large tracts of woodland and cedar 
swamps, from which he supplied the Philadel- 
phia market with wood and hoop poles in large 
quantities; and his enterprise was a great 
benefit to the community, as he furnished 
employment for a large number of men. He 
occupied the old lilmer farm for forty-two 
years, or until his retirement, when he moved 
to fairton, where he resided for the last 
twelve years of his life, dying March 6, 1896. 
He was prominently identified with all meas- 
ures relating to public improvements, and to 
his instrumentality and support is due the 
completion of the Cumberland & Maurice 
River Railroad. Though not a politician, he 
exercised considerable influence in public 
affiirs, and supported the Democratic part)' in 
|)olitics. His wife, Lydia, whom he married 
April 21, 1 841, was a daughter of John M. 
and Lydia (Brooks) Swing, her father being 
a successful oyster dealer and a lifelong resi- 
dent of Fairfield. She reared a family of 
nine children, as follows: John Swing, who 
died at the age of three years; Lydia S., who 
is now Mrs. F.dwin W. Starns, of this town; 
Isabel Potter, wife of Samuel H. Williams, 
of Camden; Emily Jane, widow of James 
McNichol ; Sophronia Mayhew, who died at 
the age of twenty-one; Eleanor T. , wife of 
Charles O. Whittaker, of Cedarville; Charles 



Swing, a resident of Fairton ; James Harris; 
and Wilburforce.B. The mother, who is still 
living, has been a member of the Presbyterian 
church for many years ; and her husband was 
an earnest worker in church affairs. 

James PL Elmer was educated in the public 
schools, and was engaged in assisting his 
father upon the home farm until 1870, when 
he married. He then bought a farm of fifty 
acres, which he has since continued to work 
with profit, paying particular attention to 
sheep raising and the breeding of fine stock. 
He owns some registered animals, and has 
made notable e.xhibits at the county fairs. 

In December, 1870, Mr. Elmer married 
Mary Emma Allen, daughter of Thomas 
Allen, of Camden. He has two children — 
Theodore Allen, who in 1894 graduated fr(un 
Lafayette Ctdlege in Easton, Pa., and is now 
at Princeton, preparing for the Presbyterian 
ministry; and Orilla, who resides at home. 
Mr. Elmer is well and favorably known as a 
straightforward business man and a citizen of 
more than ordinary intelligence and worth. 
He is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
and has been superintendent of the Sunday- 
school for eighteen years. 



OHN REMINGTON COREY 
THOMPSON, M.I)., of Bridgeton, 
N.J., son of Daniel 15. and Hannah P. 
(Corey) Thompson, was born in this city. 
May 2, i860. Daniel B. Thompson, whose 
birth occurretl in April, 181 5, received his 
education in the public scluiols. He became 




JOHN R. C. THOMPSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



a resident of Bridgeton at the age of fifteen, 
and soon after he began to learn tailoring 
inulcr Curtis Ogden. In time he became a 
first-class workman, and subsequently for 
many years he was the leading tailor of this 
city. Among the several apprentices he 
trained during this period was Uriah Stevens, 
now famous as the founder of the organization 
known as the Knights of Labor. At a later 
date ]\Ir. Thompson abandoned tailoring, and 
engaged in mercantile business, dealing in dry 
goods, and keeping a coal and wood depot, 
later also carrying on the lumber trade and 
finally a lime business. Ill health at length 
obliged him to give up all active occupation; 
and in the autumn of 1887, si.\ months after 
retiring, he died. 

A man of much public spirit, Daniel B. 
Thompson took a lively interest in local 
affairs. He represented the Second Ward in 
the Common Council for several years; and 
he was Postmaster for four years, having re- 
ceived the appointment in 1844. He was a 
Free Mason, belonging to the livening Star 
Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and an Odd Fellow 
of the Cumberland Lodge. He was one of 
the most prominent and active members of the 
Central Methodist Episcopal Church, always 
doing earnest work, whether as class leader, 
superintendent of the Sunday-school, or Trus- 
tee. His wife, who was also a member of the 
Central Church, was a daughter of John R. 
Corey. She bore him five children — Anna 
Mary, Charles H., Lizzie, Emma J., and John 
R. C. Anna Mary was the wife of Charles 
H. Dare, M.D., of Bridgeton. She died in 



March, 1S96. Lizzie died at the age of eigh- 
teen. Emma J. is the wife of Smith Tomlin, 
of Bridgeton. Mrs. Hannah P. Thompson 
makes her home in Bridgeton. 

John Remington Corey Thompson, after 
receiving his elementary education in the 
public schools of Bridgeton, completed the 
more advanced course of the South Jersey In- 
stitute and subsequently the business course 
of Bryant & Stratton's College at Philadel- 
phia. Although now well equipped for com- 
mercial life, he preferred a professional career 
and decided to qualify himself for the prac- 
tice of medicine. This purpose he carried 
out by entering the Jefferson Medical College 
in Philadelphia, from which he was graduated 
in the class of 1888. Returning to Bridgeton 
in the same year, he at once opened an office 
tind entered upon the pursuit of his profes- 
sion. Attentive and skilful, he has acquired 
an excellent practice, which yields him a com- 
fortable income. 

In 1888, April 18, Dr. Thompson was 
united in matrimony with Lottie Burch, 
daughter of Ephraim J. Burch, of Bridgeton; 
and one child, D. Herbert Thompson, has 
been born of the union. Both [parents attend 
and support the Central Methodist Episcopal 
Church, .Mrs. Thompson being a member. 
Dr. Thompson has been County Physician 
since the first year of his practice. For two 
years he was a member and the physician of 
the Board of Health. A I'ree Mason like his 
father, he belongs to the Evening Star Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., and to Bridgeton Lodge, In- 
dependent Order of Odd P'ellows. He is also 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in affiliation with Niagara Tribe, Improved 
Order of Red Men, and with Welcome Coun- 
cil, Junior Order of United American Me- 
chanics. Dr. Thompson is very highly es- 
teemed in the county, both as a professional 
man and as a private citizen. 



Y^ FRANK GLASPEY, a well-known 
lei _ dairy and produce farmer of Hopewell 
^ township, was born in Stoe Creek 
townshij) on July 14, 1849. His jjarents were 
Henry VV. and Sarah T. (Ayars) Glaspey, and 
his paternal grandfather was Silas Glaspey. 
Henry W. Glaspey was born in Cumberland 
County, New Jersey, on November 24, 18 14. 
He obtained a common-school education, and 
was reared to agricultural life. After spend- 
ing some years working for others he bought a 
farm of his own, which he managed for a year, 
and again purchased a farm near Shiloh, where 
he continued to till the soil. In 1869 he 
went to Walworth, Wis., and ojiened a gen- 
eral merchandise store, remaining there for 
two years. He then removed to Farina, III., 
in which place he purchased three farms, two 
of which he managed himself. He has since 
resided there being retired from active life 
by reason of the burden of eighty-one years. 
He is still well preserved, and his appearance 
is that of a much younger man. He married 
Sarah T. Ayars, a daughter of Clayton Ayars, 
of this county, and they have had si.x children, 
five of whom are living, namely: Emma, wife 
of Brazillie D. CrosJey, of Farina, III.; I^d- 
ward M., a resident of Nortonville, Kan. ; 



Isabella, widow of the Rev. W. C. Titsworth, 
of Alfred, N.Y. ; and Hattie. The parents 
were members of the Seventh Day Baptist 
church, in which the father officiates as a 
Deacon. 

L. Frank Glaspey received his education in 
the common schools of Shiloh and at Union 
Academy. He was then employed for a short 
time by a harness-maker and subsequently as 
a clerk in his father's store. Upon his 
father's selling out his interest in the store, 
L. Frank returned to Shiloh, where he carried 
on a farm for a year. The next three years 
were spent in I'arina, III., in farming. In 
the centennial year he again returned to 
Shiloh, and shortly after purchased a farm of 
about forty-five acres, which he now conducts, 
all of it being under good cultivation. 

In March, 1872, Mr. Glaspey was united in 
marriage to Miss Anna M. Ayars, daughter of 
Micajab Ayars, of Shiloh. Mr. and Mrs. 
Glaspey have had four children, but three of 
whom are living: Ward R., Bertha, and 
Ethel. Arthur, a promising young man 
nearly nineteen years of Tige, vvlio exjiected to 
enter college in the fall of 1895, met with an 
untimely death by drowning on July 25, 1S95. 
The family are Seventh Day Baptists in re- 
ligion, and Mr. Glaspey is a member of tlie 






J^RCIVAL NICHOLS, a respected 
citizen of Bridgeton, N.J., where he 
is living a retired life, enjoying the 
fruits of a successful business career, was 
born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on January 11, 1821, 




BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



287 



son of Robert and Sarah Van Dam (Mesier) 
Nichols. When five years old he went to 
Jamaica, L.I., to live with an uncle; anil his 
first schooling was received in that place, as 
he remained with this relative until arriving at 
the age of eleven. He then removed to Phil- 
adelphia, where he attended school. At the 
age of eighteen years he returned to Jamaica, 
L.I., and was employed on a farm there until 
reaching the age of twenty-two. Shortly after 
this he settled in Norristown, Pa., and estab- 
lished himself in the nursery and tiorist's busi- 
ness, carrying it on with profit for about four 
years. In 1847 he came to the Ireland Mill 
farm in Bridgeton, where he remained for ten 
years, coming to Bridgeton proper in 1857, 
when he took up his residence in the house he 
now owns and occupies. For ten years he 
was employed in the Cumberland Nail and 
Iron Works. On leaving there he formed a 
copartnership with David McBride, under the 
firm name of McBride & Nichols; and they 
carried on a business in coal, grain, and agri- 
cultural implements for four years. Mr. 
Nichols then sold his interest to his partner, 
and started a florist's business, which he con- 
ducted with profit for twenty years. He sold 
to I">an Miller in 1890, and since then has 
lived in practical retirement. On July 22, 
1846, he was joined in marriage with Miss 
Annie Davis, a daughter of George Davis, of 
Norristown, Pa., by whom he had a son and 
daughter. For nearly thirty-eight years the 
family circle remained unbroken; and then 
within three years he was called upon to part 
with both wife and children, his wife dying 



in April, 1884, at the age of si.\ty-four, the 
daughter, Maria L., in March, 1885, and the 
son, Robert, who was born in January, 1853, 
dying November 5, 1886. 

Mr. Nichols served as Trustee of the Third 
Ward for nine years. He is a communicant 
of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, in which 
he has been a Vestryman since its organiza- 
tion. In politics he is a Republican. 



—•••■••-•— 



2EMUEL P. SLOAN, a sturdy .and in- 
dustrious blacksmith of Greenwich, 
^■^ who makes a specialty of oyster 
dredges and shipping work, was born in New- 
port, N.J., February i, 1861, son of George 
W. and Mary T. (Plumley) Sloan. He is a 
descendant of James Sloan, a native of the 
north of Ireland, who, being of the Protestant 
faith, was obliged to fly from the country on 
account of religious persecutions during the 
reign of Queen Mary. Settling in Pennsyl- 
vania, he made a home for himself about two 
and one-half miles west of Morristown. Mr. 
Sloan's grandfather, James Sloan, second, was 
born and reared in Pennsylvania. He learned 
the trade of a blacksmith, which he followed 
through life; and he served as a soldier dur- 
ing the War of 1812. He married Elizabeth 
Hansel. Their son, George W. Sloan, was 
born in Reeseville, Pa., March 8, 1832. He 
served an apprenticeship at the blacksmith's 
trade in Philadelphia, where he continued to 
work as a journeyman until the spring of 
1855, when he moved to Newport, N.J., in 
which place he followed his trade for some 



288 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



twelve .years. In 1867 he removed to Divid- 
ing Creek, where he opened a large shop, 
whieh he carried on for fifteen years; and for 
eleven years of this time he conducted another 
shop in Port Norris, of which place he was a 
resident for five years. On May 9, iSgi, he 
sold out, and, coming to Greenwich, has since 
resided here. For a number of years he was 
a freeholder of Downs township, and has voted 
with the Republican party since its formation. 
He is a member of Neptune Lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., of Morristown. He married July 
31, 1853, Mary Plumley, a daughter of Na- 
than I'lumley, who was of old Pennsylvania 
Dutch ancestry. She is the mother of five 
children, as follows: Nathan, a resident of 
Mauricetown; George C, who resides in I'hil- 
adelphia; Sarah E., who married John H. 
Bowen, of Greenwich; Lemuel P.; and Leo- 
nora, wife of Harry E. Pierson, of Bridgeton. 
Both parents are members of the Baptist 
church. 

Lemuel P. Sloan's education was acquired 
in the schools of Dividing Creek and Port 
Norris. He learned the blacksmith's trade 
with his father, and afterward worked as a 
journeyman until coming to Greenwich. 
Here he built and occupied a shop, twenty- 
four by thirty feet, which he still conducts; 
and he is the only mechanic in this town who 
devotes his attention exclusively to shipsmith 
work and the making of oyster dredges. He 
has been largely instrumental in developing 
the business interests of the village, being 
one of the projectors of the Greenwich Pier 
Marine Railway, which he heljjed to build; 



and he now owns a one-quarter's interest in 
the enterprise. Mr. Sloan was first married 
to Clara L. Fleetwood, who died leaving two 
children — William B. and Boyd L. On De- 
cember 5, 1S94, he wedded for his second 
wife, Lizzie Brenner, of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Sloan belongs to the Jimior Order of the 
United American Mechanics. His religious 
views bring hipi into communion with the 
Baptist church, of which he is a member. He 
enjoys a well-earned prosperity, and occupies 
a pleasantly located residence, which he 
erected some time ago. 




ILLIAM HENRY DAVIS, a suc- 
cessful farmer and horse dealer, 
residing in Lawrence township, two miles 
from Cedarville, where he owns an excellent 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres, was born 
in Fairfield township on April 28, 1854. 
His parents were Smith and Fannie (Rocap) 
Davis. The father was born at Parvin's Run, 
near Vineland, and there grew to manhood. 
After his marriage to Miss Rocap, who was a 
daughter of William Rocap, of Millville, he 
settled on a farm in Fairfield township on 
the Cohansey River, where he became an ex- 
tensive farmer. He is now living a retired 
life in Bridgeton. 

William H. Davis was born on the old 
homestead, and there remained luitil he at- 
tained his majority, receiving his education in 
the public school. His first employment was 
on his father's farm at Dutch Neck, where he 
worked for two years. In i88j he bought 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



289 



his present farm; and, since coming here, he 
has been engaged in horse dealing to quite an 
extent, importing horses in carloads from the 
West, and selling them to good advantage. 
His enterprising s]iirit has also led him to 
become a grower of small fruits, in which oc- 
cupation also he has met with the success that 
has crowned his efforts in other directions. 
In politics Mr. Davis is a Democrat. He is 
a member of Massasoit Tribe, No. 16, I. O. 
Red Men. The maiden name of his wife, to 
whom he was married on February 22, 1876, 
was .-^nna S. Phillips. She is a daughter of 
William S. Phillips, of this township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Davis have three children — E. Mul- 
ford, Maggie, and Bertha N. They attend 
the Methodist Kpi.scopal Church of Cedar- 
ville. 




ll'IlRAIM H. SHKLDON, a wholesale 
meat dealer and retailer of groceries 
and provisions at 319 North Third Street, 
Millville, N.J., was born at May's Landing, 
Atlantic County. 

His father, Lemuel Sheldon, was a native 
of Vorkshire, England. He enjoyed fair edu- 
cational privileges in his boyhood, and after 
leaving school he learned the trade of an iron 
worker. At twenty years of age he came to 
this country, settling at May's Landing, 
where he entered the employ of Lewis & 
Walker, with whom he remained a number of 
years. He ne.xt went to work in a glass 
house in Port Elizabeth, where he remained 
about five years, or until his death in 1840. 
He was a Free Mason. His union with Miss 



Lydia Senders was blessed by the birth of ten 
children, of whom five lived to maturity, 
namely: Rebecca Ann, the wife of Harris 
Harris, of Clayton, N.J.; Hannah, the wife 
of Thomas Morgan, of Chew's Landing, N.J.; 
Joseph, residing in Millville; Ephraim H. ; 
and Thomas, a glass manufacturer of Gas 
City, Ind. 

Ephraim H. Sheldon, who is the si)ecial 
subject of the present sketch, received his ed- 
ucation in the public schools of Millville. 
His parents removed to this place when he 
was very young. After completing his school- 
ing, he set himself to acquiring the art of 
glass blowing, going in 1857 to Baltimore, 
Md. , where he finished learning his trade, and 
worked at it up to 1S60. He then returned to 
Millville, and started in the grocery and meat 
business, which he has since conducted very 
successfully. He has a large slaughtering 
establishment and packing house, which he 
has operated for twenty-five years, or longer 
than any other person in the city has been 
similarly engaged, and does an extensive 
wholesale business, being the only dealer who 
puts up fresh, salt, and smoked meats. For 
twenty-two years he was at 18 High Street; 
but in September, 1895, he moved into his 
large two-and-a-half-story wooden l)uilding at 
319 North Third Street, which is entirely 
devoted to his business. This is separate 
from his abattoir, which is located on the op- 
posite side of the street. 

On March 25, i860, Mr. Sheldon was 
joined in marriage with Miss Sally Cheesman, 
a daughter of Reuben Cheesman, of Millville. 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Four children were born to them, as follows: 
Frank, living in Clayton, N.J. ; John How- 
ard, in Millville; George; and Sally C. 
Their mother died on July 25, 1891. On No- 
vember 26, 1893, Mr. Sheldon was married 
to his present wife, formerly Miss Kate 
Reeves, who is a daughter of Morris Reeves. 

Elected to the City Council from Ward 2, 
Mr. Sheldon served on the Buildings and 
Water Works Committees. He has likewise 
served as Highway Surveyor for several years, 
and one term on the ]5oaid of Education, and 
was chosen Freeholder from 1868 to 1871. 
He is a Mason, being a member of Shekinah 
Lodge; Richman Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons: and Olivet Commandery, Knights 
Templars. He is also a member of Humane 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Millville; and .Millville Encampment: and a 
charter member of Shekinah Lodge, Knights 
of Pythias. Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon are com- 
municants of the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Millville, in which he has served 
as steward for fifteen years. 



(s5Y^HN WH.LCOX, the proprietor of the 
Jersey State Nurseries at Bridgeton, 
was born in Malone, N.Y., April 11, 
1830, being the son of Dr. David and Eliza- 
beth (Cass) Willco.x. 

David Willcox was born in Dublin, Ireland. 
At the age of eight years he ran away from 
home, and fell in with a captain of a vessel, 
who took a liking to him, and generously pro- 
posed to give him a free passage to' Quebec. 



He accepted the proffered kindness, made the 
voyage, and, landing at the port of destina- 
tion, worked his way up to Montreal. There 
he was fortunate enough to find friends in a 
family, who received him into their household, 
and gave him the advantages of a coninion- 
school education. After that he engaged as 
a clerk in a store, and later as a book-keeper. 
The money which he was able to set aside en- 
abled him to pursue a course of study in the 
medical department of McGill LTniversity in 
Montreal, from which he was graduated, re- 
ceiving his professional diploma October 27, 

1829. He then removed to L'Orignal, On- 
tario, where he began medical practice, going 
thence, however, to Malone, N.Y. , early in 

1830, shortly before the birth of his son John. 
He remained there about two years, and in 
1832 returned to L'Orignal, Ontario, where 
he practised his profession until his decease 
in 1848. About 1824 he married Miss Eliza- 
beth Cass, daughter of Joseph Cass, of 
L'Orignal, who was among the Revolutionary 
refugees. Dr. Willco.x hatl a family of nine 
children, of whom eight lived to maturity, 
namely: Edward; William; Josiah; David; 
John; Daniel; Jeanette, who is the wife of 
Elisha B. Dean, of San Jose, Cal.; and Su- 
sanna. Dr. Willco.x was identified with the 
fraternity of Free Masons. 

John Willcox, with whom this sketch is 
mainly concerned, received his education in 
the common schools of L'Orignal. In early 
youth he learned the chair-maker's trade, and 
when only twenty years of age removed to 
Omro, Winnebago County, Wis., where he 




m^' 






Mr. and Mrs. JOHN WILLCOX. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



293 



followed that occupation about four years. 
He then went to Klamath County, California, 
and engaged for four years in mining. At 
the end of that time lie returned to Oniro, and 
established himself there in the nursery busi- 
ness in company with his brother. Discon- 
tinuing that business, he in 1875 came East 
to New York City, where he remained a year, 
coming in 1877 t" New Jersey, and engaging 
in the nursery business at Vinelantl, in part- 
nership with R. D. Cole, under the firm name 
of the West Jersey Nursery Company. Dis- 
solving that partnership about twelve years 
later, he removed to ]5ridgeton, and estab- 
lished the Jersey State Nurseries, which he 
has conducted with enterprise and prosperity 
to the present time. 

Mr. Willcox has been twice married. In 
1858 he was joined in matrimony with Miss 
Gertrude Van Cleck, of L'Orignal, Ottawa, to 
whom were born four children, only two of 
whom grew to maturity, namely: Carrie, who 
is tlie wife of O. S. Johnson, of Princeton, 
Wis.; and Mabel. On March 4, i S90, he was 
ijiarried to Margaret Jones, who is the daugh- 
ter of Edward Jones, of l^uckingham County, 
Virginia. 

In his younger days Mr. Willcox was affili- 
ated with the Independent Oriler of Odii Fel- 
lows, and had the distinction of being a Past 
Grand and also a Past High Priest of the en- 
campment. 

In politics Mr. Willcox was early identified 
with the Republican party, assisting in its 
formation, and affiliating with it until the 
candidacy of Horace Greeley, when he x'oted 



for him. He next supported the Greenback 
party, and later becoming a Populist remains 
so to-day. 

<^*»-» — — 

-sTfOSEPH BEAUMONT, a successful ma- 
chinist, now residing in Vineland, 
N.J., was born at Clitheroe, in Lanca- 
shire, England, May 12, 1837. His father, 
George Beaumont, whose birth occurred March 
20, 181 1, was educated in the common schools 
of his native place. After leaving school he 
learneil the trade of a weaver, which he fol- 
lowed prosperously until his death, December 
22, 1876, at the age of sixty-five years. In 
1833 he married Susanna, daughter of Richard 
and Susanna Oddy, of Gildersome, Yorkshire. 
Mr. Oddy was a constable in Gildersome and 
an Episcopalian in religious belief. He and 
his wife had eleven children, of whom eight 
grew to maturity; namely, Sarah, Joseph, 
Richard, Mary, Ann, John, George, and 
James. 

Joseph Beaumont's education was received 
in the common schools of Lancashire. After 
finishing his studies he was apprenticed to the 
trade of machinist. But two years of his 
time had expired when, in 1S56, he emigrated 
to this country. On his arrival he went to 
Schenectady, N.Y., and made arrangements 
to complete his apprenticeship. This being 
accomplished in 1857, he went to La Porte, 
Ind., and worked at his trade until the spring 
of 1858. He then went to Panama, and ob- 
tained employment in tlie machine shop of 
the Panama Railway Company. He contin- 
ued in the service of this corporation for the 



294 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



next thirty-two years. For eighteen months, 
beginning in i860, he was engineer of their 
steamship "Columbus," alleged to have been 
the first steam vessel navigated along the 
Pacific coast of Central America. On January 
I, 1885, he was made master mechanic of the 
company's shops; and he held that position 
until September, 1890, when the failure of his 
health obliged him to leave Panama for a more 
temperate climate. He then rejoined his 
family in Vineland, where he has since been 
engaged in manufacturing a patent automatic 
low point marker for surfacing railroad tracks, 
ejecting paint on rails where repairs are 
needed. 

On October 2, 1865, Mr. Beaumont married 
Anne, daughter of Thomas Redihalgh, of 
Leeds, England. They had one child, Isa- 
bella Anne, who died at Colon, Panama, in 
April, 1887, aged nineteen years and eleven 
months. Mr. and Mrs. Peaumont are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
take an active interest in church work. Mr. 
Beaumont was one of the Trustees of his 
church, while his wife has for many years 
been I'resident of the Woman's P'oreign Mis- 
sionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Vineland. 

In politics Mr. Beaumont is a Republican. 
Largely a self-educated man, lie has a wide 
and varied knowledge of scientific subjects, 
antl is a corresponding member of the New 
York Academy of Sciences and of the New 
York Microscopical Society. While in Cen- 
tral America he availed himself oi the oppor- 
tunities afforded him to make a special study 



of the termites, or white ants. The results of 
his researches were embodied in two interest- 
ing papers, subsequently read before the New 
York Academy of Sciences. Mr. Beaumont 
was for about three years a member of the 
Board of Education of Vineland. His resi- 
dence on Landis Avenue was purchased by him 
in April, 1S63, and was the home of his wife 
and daughter for the greater part of his stay 
in Panama. 



^OHN BATEMAN GARRISON, a re- 
spected farmer and a chosen P'reeholder 
of Stoe Creek, Cumberland County, 
N.J., was born on the old family homestead 
in Stoe Creek on April 26, 1855, being the 
son of William and Mary O. (Garrattson) 
Garrison. 

His father, William Garrison, was a son of 
Thompson Garrison. His birth occurretl in 
Salem County, New Jersey; but in early life 
he removed to Stoe Creek, Cumberland 
Countv, where he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits throughout his active life, and wliere 
he was also largely interested in the sand busi- 
ness. He gave employment, on an average, 
to from fifteen to twenty men in washing 
and preparing the sand for sale, to be used in 
the manufacture of glass, he being one of the 
first men in that vicinity to engage success- 
fully in the sand trade. Besides the farm on 
which he resided and which he cultivated, he 
owned another piece of property, ninety acres 
in extent, that he rented ; and he thus had a 
landed possession of one hundred and fifty 
acres. He married as his second wife Miss 



BIOGRAPHECAL REVIEW 



29s 



Garrattson, of Fairton, Cuniberlaiul County, 
and they became the parents of five children, 
three sons and two (laii<;hters, naniel)': 
Martha, who is the wife of Edgar Sheppard ; 
William O. ; John I?.; Henry, who is in the 
sand and furniture business at Cedarville, 
Cumberland County; and Mary, now de- 
ceased, who was the wife of Philip Hann. 
Mr. William Garrison served his town in sev- 
eral public positions, among them that of 
Trustee of the schools. 

John Garrison, the direct subject of this 
sketch, received his early education in the 
common schools of Stoe Creek. He later pur- 
sued a course of stud)- at Shiloh Academy, 
then a notably good school, and subsequently 
at the South Jersey Institute also. Soon 
after his marriage, in 1875, he engaged in 
farming at Stoe Creek, where he has resided 
ever since, and where he has followed various 
pursuits, such as general farming, the raising 
of strawberries, peaches, and other fruit, and 
lumbering. He also owns a farm in Mill- 
ville, Cumberland County, which has on it a 
large quantity of glass sand, of which he sells 
many loads every year on royalty. 

On March 11, 1875, he was joined in matri- 
mony with Miss Rhoda Kelle\-, wiio is the 
daughter of Job Kellcy, of Newport, Cumber- 
land County, N.J. Into their home have 
come six children — Ella, Harvey, Eva, 
Laura, Oscar, and George. Mr. Garrison's 
public services have been frequently sought, 
and he has been honored at the hands of his 
fellow-townsmen by election to several re- 
sponsible positions. He is a Trustee of the 



public schools, in which capacity he has 
served for a period of years, and he is now 
discliarging in his second term of office the 
duties of chosen Freeholder, to which position 
he was elected without opposition; and he is 
also a member of the committee which has the 
supervision of the sheriffs, of the almshouse, 
etc. Both he and his wife are identified with 
the Canton Baptist Church, in the religious 
work of which he is very actively engaged, 
being Deacon of the church and also the super- 
intendent of the Sunday-school. In politics 
he has been a lifelong Republican. 



■AMES ELLSWORTH MITCHELL, 
superintendent of the T. C. Wheaton 
Glass Works in Millville, was born in 
rhiladelphia, March 16, 1S58, son of James 
and Elizabeth (McGonegal) Mitchell, both 
natives of the north of Ireland. Sturdy, in- 
dustrious people and firm adherents to the 
Scotch Presbyterian faith, his parents reared 
their children according to the strict religious 
teachings of that church. James Mitchell 
learned the trade of a carpet weaver in Ire- 
land. In 1S45 he emigrated to this country, 
making his residence in Philadelphia. Here 
he became the first foreman of the carpet fac- 
tory established by the father of Alexander 
Crow, so well known at the present day, and 
was instrumental in founding the wide reputa- 
tion acquired by that concern. During his 
long connection with the carpet manufacturing 
industry it was his constant effort, in which 
he was largely successful, to bring home- 



296 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



made goods up to a high standard of excel- 
lence. He continued actively engaged in the 
business until his death, which occurred at 
the family residence in Fairmount, Pa., in 
1892, at the age of sixty-nine years. His 
wife, Elizabeth, who died in 1871, became 
the mother of nine children, three of whom 
are living, namely: Matilda, the wife of John 
Montgomery, City Surveyor of Philadelphia; 
Elizabeth, the wife of William Smith, a police 
sergeant of this city; and James E. , the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

James Ellsworth Mitchell acquired the ru- 
diments of his education in the public schools 
of Philadelphia, which he attended for three 
years. Beyond this, being of a studious in- 
clination, he gained much valuable knowledge 
upon practical subjects by self-tuition and a 
course of careful reading. At the age of 
fifteen he came to Millvillc, where he entered 
the employ of Whitall, Tatum & Co., with 
whom he remained in all, as an apprentice and 
a journeyman glass worker, for fourteen years. 
About the year 1888, when the T. C. Whea- 
t<in Company established its glass factory 
here he was secured as foreman of the ho- 
moeopathic or small bottle department. Three 
years later he was made general foreman of 
the factory, and finally was ajipointed to his 
present responsible position of superintendent 
of the works. The concern employ an average 
of one hundred and seventy men, who are 
kept busy in producing the material required 
to meet the steadily increasing demand made 
upon the company's outiMit. The practical 
part of tlie work is presided over by Mr. 



Mitchell, whose knowledge, experience, and 
natural fitness for his occupation are of untold 
value to his employers. 

Although not an aspirant to public ofifice, 
Mr. Mitchell is actively interested in political 
affairs. He united with the Republican 
party upon reaching his majority, and has 
been one of its most ardent and serviceable 
supporters since. He has been sent as a dele- 
gate to several county and State conventions, 
in which he often had the honor of nominating 
successful canditlates for the legislature and 
other branches of the public service, including 
Congressman Loudenslager. Eor the jiast 
four years he has been Chairman of the Re- 
publican County Committee, in which capacity 
his wise counsel and spirited action have 
greatly enhanced the party's prestige, and for- 
warded its interests in this section of the 
State. He is particularly interested in secur- 
ing good men to serve upon the School Board, 
believing that the best educational and moral 
qualifications should be i)ossessed by members 
of that body. In both the Junior Order of the 
United American Mechanics and the Knights 
of the Golden Eagle he is an active and ex- 
tremely valuable member. He was one of the 
organizers of the Columbia Loan and Build- 
ing Association of Millville, served on its 
Board of Directors for three years, and is now 
its President. 

On March 15, 1882, Mr. Mitchell wedded 
Fanny Andrew De Maris, daughter of Freeman 
De Maris, of Cedarville. He has now five 
children — Bessie T., Anna H., Edith 1)., 
James E., Jr., and I'uster Voorhees. When 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



297 



seventeen years of age he joined the Presby- 
terian church, and has since been active in its 
work. He served as superintendent of the 
Sunday-school for seven years, and is now 
President of the Young People's Christian 
luideavor Society connected with the church 
in Millville. The family residence is pleas- 
antly located at 714 High Street. 



OSEPH TOMLINSON, M.D., a suc- 
cessful physician and surgeon of 
Bridgeton, was born in Roadstown, 
N.J., August 15, 1854, son of Dr. George and 
Phebe (Mulford) Tomlinson. George Tomlin- 
son was a native of Stoe Creek, N.J., in which 
place his boyhood and youth were passed. 
lie there attended the common schools, and 
assisted his father in carrying on the farm. 
In early manhood he matriculated at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons of the West- 
ern District of New York, and after graduat- 
ing he began the practice oi his profession in 
Roadstown. His skill and faithful attention 
to liis duties enabled him to acquire a large 
and profitable practice; and he continued ac- 
tively connected with the medical profession 
until 1882, when he moved to Shiloh, where 
he spent the rest of his life in retirement, 
dying in 1892. His wife, Phebe, was a 
daughter of Henry Mulford, of Roadstown. 
She became the mother of eight children, 
as follows: Thomas H., now a physician 
of Plainfield, N.J.; Horatio M. , a resident of 
Roadstown; Sojjhronia A., a physician of 
Providence, R.I.; Edward M., Professor 



of Greek in Alfred University, Allegany 
County, New York; ICmma (deceased), who 
married the Rev. A. E. Main; George A., a 
resident of Roadstown; Mary J., deceased; 
and Joseph. The parents were members of 
the Seventh Day Baptist church. 

Joseph Tomlinson, after attending the dis- 
trict schools of Roadstown, took a course at 
Union Academy, Shiloh. He then entered 
Williams College at Williamstown, Mass., 
from which he was graduated with the class of 
1875, His medical studies were pursued at 
the New York College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, from which he was graduated in 1878; 
and, after serving for eighteen months as house 
physician at the Charity Hospital of New 
York City, he received his diploma from that 
institution in 1S80. His first year's practice 
was with his brotlier in Plainfield; and he then 
returned to New York City, where he engaged 
in a general practice, and also opened a "Quiz 
class," in which he prepared a large number of 
students for hos|)ital and government service 
examinations. In i8S7he establisheil himself 
in Roadstown, where he practised his profes- 
sion successfully for about six years, or until 
1893, when he came to Bridgeton. Since 
locating here he has built up an extensive and 
lucrative practice, both of medicine anil sur- 
gery. He is a member and at the present 
time Treasurer of the Cumberland County 
Medical Society, and is also a Fellow of the 
American Academy of Medicine. On June 
15, 188 1, Dr. Tomlinson married Caroline M. 
Lawrence, a daughter of J. W. Lawrence, of 
Troy, N. Y. He has two children — George 



29S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Lawrence and Devoe. Dr. and Mrs. Tomlin- 
son attend the Presbyterian church. 



Tu^EV. ADOLPH ROEDER, pastor of 
I ^Y^ the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian) 
V««^ Church of Vineland, is i<novvn in 
two hemispheres as a scholar, translator, and 
prolific writer of prose and verse. He was 
born in ]?altimore, Md., March i, 1856, son 
of Charles and Mary (Hempel) Roeder, the 
former a native of P'rankfort, Germany, the 
latter of Ilanau, a town within four hours' ride 
of P'rankfort. 

Charles Roeder was in trade in his native 
country for some years. He was married in 
Germany, and early in the fifties came to this 
country with his wife and famil)', settling in 
H iltimore. At the time of the war the family 
were continuously on the move, several times 
being between the two armies; and very often 
the children were obliged to hide for protec- 
tion. The Rev. Mr. Roeder, though so young 
at the time, distinctly remembers scenes of 
destruction which were dee]dy stamped on his 
childish mind — the collapse of a house from 
the shock of a cannon ball, or a fire started by 
a bursting shell. His father finally settled in 
P.gg Plarbor City, N.J., where he died in 
1894. His mother is still living. P'ive chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Roeder, two 
of whom arj living — Adolph, the subject of 
this sketch: and P^mma, wife of Professor 
]'".mil Gastel, of Philadelphia. 

Adolph Roeder acquired the rudiments of 
his education in German and P'rench, begin- 



ning to study in English when he was thirteen 
years old. Pie graduated from the Episcopal 
Academy at Philadelphia, which was then in 
charge of the Rev. Dr. Robbins, having there 
acquired a knowledge of the Oriental lan- 
guages; and, as his parents were Sweden- 
borgians, he continued his studies at the 
Swedenborgian Theological Seminary, com- 
pleting the course at the age of eighteen. 
While attending school he taught in I'hiladel- 
phia, making a specialty of the languages, and 
had a large patronage; and he began to preach 
at the age of seventeen, four years before his 
ordination. He still teaches to a limited 
extent, preparing students for college. As a 
clergyman he was first located at Frankford, 
Philadelphia, and then went • to Baltimore, 
where he took up the work of the New Church 
among the Germans especially of that city, 
whose respect and esteem he won. He 
formed new organizations there, and l-secame 
the leading man of the Synod, wliich was 
formed and incorporated under the laws of Il- 
linois, where is the head and centre of the New 
Church; and Dr. Roeder still hokls a iiigh 
position in the councils of the Synod. He 
was obliged to suspend work in Baltimore on 
account of failing health, and went to the sea- 
shore, where he remained some time. In 
1885 he became i)astor of the church in Vine- 
land, whicii was then very small, and which 
under his management has greatly increased 
in size and popularity. While here he has 
had many calls to preach in more important 
pulpits of his denomination. In P'ebruary, 
1896, he took charge of the New Church at 



BIOGRAPHICAL RFAHEW 



299 



Orange, N.J., wiiilc retaining his residence 
at Vinelancl. 

As a writer his genius is of an unusual 
order. A lover of music and a skilled instru- 
mental performer, though never exhibiting 
this talent in public, he began work as a trans- 
lator of songs when in charge of his Frankford 
church, and [uiblished many rare gems that had 
never been used in this country. His Ger- 
man translations are true to the original, per- 
fect in rhyme, and, most difficult of all, give 
the vowel and sound best adapted to each note. 
There is but one other translator who does 
this; and the noted Philadelphia music pub- 
lishers. Boner & Meyer, gave Mr. Roeder all he 
could do, and many German societies sought 
his services. He has also tra'nslated much 
poetry that is not set to music, and, as a com- 
poser, has won widespread ]3opularity, includ- 
ing among his i^ieces "Strangers Yesterday," 
"Thy Words," "The Silent City," "The 
Shadows of the Valley," the "Alyta Waltz," 
and "Rosy Morn." "The Song of the Three 
Tramps," words by Dodge of the New York 
lior/i/, was also set to music by Mr. Roeder, 
under a //(>!// dr [^Ininr. This work — translat- 
ing verse and setting it to music — Mr. 
Roeder does because he enjoys it, and he has 
finished an enormous amount. He teaches 
music, too; and he has a wide acc|uaintance in 
musical circles, numbering among his friends 
Professor Zeckwer, of the Philadelphia Con- 
servatory of Music, and other well-known 
musicians; while Professor Emil Gastel is his 
brother-in-law. 

In the realm of prose the Rev. Mr. Roeder 



is also an accomplished writer. After settling 
in Vineland he purchased from the Rev. Mr. 
Brickman a paper called Bote ifcr Ncui-ii 
Kirchc (Messenger of the New Church), 
which, as editor and ijroiirietor, he published 
monthly until 1894, when he made it the 
official organ of the .S)'n()d, who now publish 
it in St. Louis; and Mr. Roeder still ctmtrib- 
utes largely to its pages. He is also a regu- 
lar correspondent for many other papers and 
a contributor to several periodicals, including 
the Auicrican Magazine of Civics, the A'cw 
CInnrli Magazine, the AtTc Clirisliaiiit)\ and 
the Neiv Church Messenger. Under tlie noin rfe 
plinnc of Harvey Reese he writes light matter 
for the secular press; and he is a correspond- 
ent for a number of papers in France, Ger- 
many, and India, to which he has contributed 
much in regard to the political situation in 
Turkey and Armenia. The jK'tition to Presi- 
dent Cleveland that the American government 
should interfere in behalf of Armenia passed 
through Mr. Roetler's hands. He has pub- 
lished many tracts and books in German ]K'r- 
taining to the work of the church, including 
"The Doctrine of the New Jerusalem concern- 
ing the Lord," a book which he translated from 
the Latin; and one of his largest and most im- 
portant translations from English to German 
is the leailing church work, "Skepticism and 
Divine Revelation." In English he has writ- 
ten books too numerous to mcnticin in our lim- 
ited space, including juvenile works of a first- 
class character; and his original poetry is of a 
high order, one epic, "Nebo, " being a standard 
production, which is often quoted from. 



3°° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Particularly skilled in foreign languages, 
for a time he located the mail plant for dis- 
tribution from Vineland. The enlargement of 
his work necessitated the establishment of 
agencies in Germany, France, and Austria. 
Dr. Roeder is a member of the Psychic 
Research Society, which has branches in Eng- 
land and America; of the University E.xten- 
sion Society; of the American Institute of 
Civics, whose members are all in favor of 
municipal reform; and of the National Mu- 
nicii)al League, of which Charles J. Bonaparte 
is President. He is local Secretary of the 
Citizens' Committee and Corresponding Secre- 
tary of the National Direct Legislation and 
Reform Society. 

March l6, 1879, he was married to Mary, 
daughter of John ]5onschur, a scion of the old 
P'rench nobility, many of whom found a home 
in Philadelphia after the Revolution in 
P'rance. Mrs. Roeder, who is a native of 
Philadelphia, is the sister of Dr. G. A. 
Honschur, a prominent New York physician, 
and of II. K. Bonschur, a member of the firm 
of Bonschur & Holmes, the leading opticians 
of Philadelphia. She is the mother of three 
children — Miriam, Lisa, and Arthur. Miss 
Elsa Roeder already displays much talent as 
an artist. 



ISAAC HAMPTON FOSTER, a popular 
merchant and the Postmaster of Heisler- 
ville, was born in Leesburg, Cumber- 
land County, January 18, 1863, son of Samuel 
and Mary C. (Hampton) P'oster. The family, 
which is of English extraction, was founded 



by his great-great-grandfather. His great- 
grandfather and grandfather were both named 
Thomas. The latter, who was born in Cape 
May County, probably at Dyer's Creek, and 
lived in a farming district, devoted his time 
chiefly to agriculture, and died in 1835. His 
wife, Catherine, was a daughter of John 
Tomlin, of Heislerville, who came originally 
from Gloucester County, and was one of the 
pioneer settlers of Heislerville, where he 
owned a good deal of land. Mrs. Catherine 
(Tomlin) P'oster had but one child by her first 
marriage, Samuel, the father of our subject. 
She subsequently married Nathaniel Norton, 
by whom she had four children, two of whom 
are living — Nathaniel and Francis. She was 
an esteemed member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Samuel Foster was born at Dyer's Creek, 
November 26, 1833. He was but an infant 
when his father died; and he lived with his 
uncle, Aaron Tomlin, until of age. He ob- 
tained his early education in the common 
schools, and subsequently attended Eldridge 
Hill Boarding-school in \\\)odstown, N.J. 
He afterward taught in Lancaster Academy 
at Norristovvn, N.J., for a year, at the same 
time taking a special course of study. He 
then taught in a public school in Leesburg 
for about six years and in different schools in 
the vicinity for five years more. In 1865 he 
])urchased the store in Heislerville formerly 
owned by George Heisler, in whose honor the 
town was named. There for years he has had 
a large trade in general merchandise. In 
1885 he began to keep a temperance hotel. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



301 



For six or seven years he has clone a large fire 
insurance business, acting as agent for the 
German-American Company; and he was the 
first in this locality by five or six years to 
grow strawberries for tlie wholesale trade. 
He owns a farm of about twenty-eight acres, 
twenty-one of which are under cultivation. 
There he raises from three to five acres of 
strawberries, and from one to two acres of 
cantaloupes, besides white and sweet potatoes, 
corn, and all sorts of vegetables. He ships 
large quantities of fruit to New York, Phila- 
delphia, Newark, and Boston. Mr. Foster 
has been Commissioner of Deeds for many 
years. Township Clerk for the past fourteen 
years, having been recently re-elected for 
three years more, and Township Assessor for 
four years. 

Mr. Foster was married October 29, 1859, 
to Mary C, daughter of Isaac Hampton, by 
whom he became the father of two children. 
These were: Thomas, now deceased, who was 
for five years the keeper of the Maurice River 
Lighthouse; and Isaac Hamptcm, the subject 
of this sketch. Both parents are members of 
the IMethodist Episcopal church. Mr. Foster 
has seen Heislerville grow from a small settle- 
ment in the wilderness to a thriving town. 

Isaac Hampton I'oster acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his native 
town and in Pierce Business College at 
Philadelphia. In 18S0 he went to work in a 
printing-office in Philadelphia, where he re- 
mained about four years. While here he com- 
pleted a business course of evening tuition. 
In 1885, well-grounded in the principles of 



book-keeping and commercial affairs, he took 
charge of his father's store, and has since con- 
ducted it as manager. 

Mr. Foster was married in 1S92 to Miss 
Rettie S. Goff, daughter of Asbury Goff, of 
East Creek, Cape May County. Of the two 
children born to him Thomas is living. The 
other died in infancy. Mr. Foster has many 
friends. He is an esteemed member of Lees- 
burg Council of the Junior Order of the 
United American Mechanics, and of Court 
Stephen Ciirard of the Ancient (3rder of 
Foresters of Philadelphia. He attends and 
supports the Methodist Episcopal church. 



(^OHN COOMBS GARRISON, an enter- 
prising agriculturist and an extensive 
fruit grower of Haleyville, in Commer- 
cial township, Cumberland County, N.J., was 
born in Deerfield, this county, April 6, 1835, 
being a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Coombs) 
Garrison. 

His father was a son of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Garrison, formerly of Broad Neck, Salem 
County, N.J., to whom he was born June 27, 
1802. He was educated in the common 
schools of his native town, and after the con- 
clusion of his period of schooling he remained 
at home until his marriage. He then pur- 
chased a farm of about one hundred acres in 
Deerfield township, on which he conducted 
general husbandry. He kept three first-class 
horses, and reared and sold two or three colts 
every year. On March 26, 1825, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth, a 



302 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Coombs, of 
Dcerfickl. They became the parents of eight 
children, all but two of whom still survive, 
namely: Catherine, who was born January 29, 
1S26, and who has been twice married, first to 
Mlmcr McPherson, of Bridgeton, and subse- 
quently to his decease to John McKee, also of 
Bridgeton; Susan, who was born July 22, 
1829, and who was married to Lewis McPher- 
son; Daniel, also born July 22, 1829; Rachel, 
who was born September i, 1831, and who be- 
came the wife of Andrew Paris; John Coombs, 
who is further mentioned below; and David, 
who was born October 30, 1838. 

John Coombs Garrison received his intel- 
lectual training in the common schools of 
Woodruff, in Deerfield township. He re- 
mained at home on the jiaternal farm until he 
was eighteen years of age, when on the event 
of his father's decease he went to work on 
the Hannon farm, where he was occupied for 
the two following years. At the age of 
twenty he became an employee in the rolling- 
mills (if the Cumberland Nail and Iron Com- 
pany as a puddler, remaining with that corpo- 
ration until the breaking out of the Civil War. 
On May 28, 1861, he enlisted in Company V 
of the Third. New Jersey Regiment, in the 
First Brigade of the .Sixth Army Corjis. He 
was in all the battles in which his regiment 
was engaged except during his short captiv- 
ity. He was taken prisoner in the battle of 
the Wilderness, but on the following day he 
was recaptured by General Sheridan. He 
served as a color guard for two years. 

Discharged on June 2;}, 1864, he returned 



to the rolling-mill, in which, however, he con- 
tinued only a short time. He then directed 
his attention to oyster fishing, making his 
first trip on an oyster boat in the winter of 
1864, and continuing in that business, as 
events proved, for more than twenty years. 
In I 87 1 he purchased an oyster boat, which he 
sailed successfully until 1886, when he bought 
his present farm, which he conducts in con- 
nection with another piece of property, 
twenty-nine acres in extent, owned by his 
wife. On his own farm of one hundred and 
six acres he at first made a specialty of the 
culture of peaches, raising in some seasons as 
many as two thousand baskets of that fruit. 
He devotes about twelve acres of land to the 
cultivation of strawberries, and during the 
strawberry season employs about twenty 
pickers, a ready market for his berries being 
found in New York City and in Boston. He 
also specializes in sweet potatoes, setting out 
yearly about twenty thousand plants. Mr. 
Garrison keeps about five horses and colts, and 
also a team of mules. He has raised consider- 
able stock of approved breed; and at present 
he has a fine bay filly, sired by Bentoneer, 
whose racing record is 2.28 1-2. Her dam 
was Lizzie A., sired by Young Volunteer. 
Mr. Garrison has also reared some excellent 
Jersey cattle, and he now has one of the finest 
Jersey bulls in the State. Keeping about two 
hundred bens, he sends to market a large quan- 
tity of eggs. He likewise owns a flock of one 
hundred and twenty pairs of pigeons, and he 
expects to engage more extensiveh' in the 
pigeon business. 




i 




CONSTANT W. HAND. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



305 



Mr. Garrison has been twice married. In 
1857 he was united in matrimony with Miss 
Sarah C, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Vanable, of Bridgeton, N.J. Two children 
were the fruit of this union, namely: Johnctta, 
who died when she was two years old; and 
Klwood, who now resides at Elreno, Ok. 
El wood Garrison left home at the age of nine- 
teen, and went to work on a cattle ranch, and 
a little later spent a brief period in Kansas. 
He then conducted a traffic in mules among 
the Indians until he lost them all, when he 
removed to Colorado to enter the employment 
of General Sophris, on his very extensive 
ranch. The second year of his engagement 
he was appointed foreman of the ranch, which 
then contained twenty thousand head of cattle. 
Remaining with General Sophris until 1SS6, 
he then commenced in business for himself; 
and he is now the proprietor of a large ranch 
at Elreno, Ok. 

Mrs. Sarah C. Garrison, who was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Bridge- 
ton, died while Mr. Garrison was absent in 
the army; and on August 6, 1864, he wedded 
Miss Lydia, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Phiiieas Lupton, of Newport, N.J. Mr. Lup- 
ton's original name was William Wesley 
Hurd; but when he was quite young he and 
his mother removed from the W^est, and took 
up their residence with Phineas Lupton, with 
whom he grew up, and from whom he received 
the name by which he was ever afterward 
known. He for many years resided at New- 
port, N.J., as a butcher, and also as the pro- 
prietor of a store. On March 29, 1840, he 



married Miss Rachel, a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Fleetwood. This union was 
favored by the birth of eight children, six of 
whom attained to maturity, namely: Lydia 
C, who is now Mrs. Garrison; Emma; 
Cynthia; Stamford; Ellmina; and Milton. 
In religious belief and fellowship both Mr. 
and Mrs. Lupton were identified with the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Dividing 
Creek. His decease occurred in 1864. 

Mr. Garrison is intimately connected with 
the social and civic affairs of his community, 
and he is widely and favorably known. He 
now officiates as constable, in which capacity 
he has served for a number of years. He 
affiliates with the Order of Odd Fellows, 
being a member of Social Lodge of Dividing 
Creek. He also belongs to the Idaho Tribe 
of the Improved Order of Red Men, located 
at Port Norris; and he likewise fraternizes 
with the Knights of Pythias in Morning Light 
Lodge of Newport. In national jiolitics he is 
found in the ranks of the Republican party, 
of the jirinciples advocated by wliich lie is a 
vigorous supporter. 




ONSTANT W. HAND, the genial 
r Postmaster at Port Norris, N.J., and 
also an oyster shipper and planter, 
was born here on the 2Sth of April, 1857, son 
of Job and Margaret (Garrison) Hand. 

Job Hand was born November 8, 1822, in 
Dias Creek, Cape May County. He spent 
his early life there, and when a young man 
moved to Port Norris. Recognizing the great 



3o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



importance of the oyster trade and culture, he 
bought a boat and entered the business heart 
and soul, being one of the very first to go into 
it. He was, moreover, the first man to ship 
oysters away from the town : and he is still held 
in grateful memory as the father of one of the 
most important industries of the town of Port 
Norris. He continued to take a great interest 
in the culture of the bivalves all his life; but, 
after a few years from his entering it, he de- 
voted more of his time to shipping them than 
to growing them, sending away three or four 
carloads a day, being the largest shipper of 
that time. Job Hand was also one of the 
original shareholders of the Cumberland & 
Maurice River Railroad. 

He married Miss Garrison, the daughter of 
Mr. James Garrison, who was a farmer and a 
wood dealer of this vicinity and a member of 
the prominent and widely known Garrison 
family of Cumberland County. Miss Garrison 
was born in this district near the town of Port 
Norris. Mr. and Mrs. Job Hand were the 
parents of twelve children, of whom but five 
lived to maturity, namely: Matilcki, who is 
now the wife of Thomas Mayhew; Warrington 
I.., who lives in the city of Bridgeton, N.J.; 
Ruth, the wife of Henry Berry; Constant W., 
Postmaster of Port Norris; and Abigail, who 
died the wife of David R. Lake. Mr. and 
Mrs. Job Hand were both members of the 
Methodist church. They died after their chil- 
dren were grown, Mr. Hand passing away on 
the 28th of September, 1878. He was a 
member of Neptune Lodge, No. 75, A. F. & 
A. M., in Mauricetown, and also of the 



Knights of Pythias, of which organization he 
was Past Chancellor. He was a Democrat in 
political faith, but never entered actively into 
politics. 

Constant W. Hand received a good practi- 
cal education at Port Norris; and tlien he went 
to work with his father, learning the oyster 
business from the bottom up, going out on the 
boats to become thoroughly acquainted with 
the cultivation of the oysters. After the 
death of his father Mr. Hand continued to 
run . the business alone until twelve years 
ago he went into partnership with Mr. Henry 
Berry, who married his sister Ruth. The firm 
name is now Hand & Berry. These gentle- 
men own and operate three oyster boats, 
thereby giving employment to nineteen men 
during the oyster season. They have control 
over a large number of good grounds, and 
plant there quite extensively. In a good 
year, when the oysters run to a large quantity, 
they gather as many as one thousand bushels a 
day; but this is, of course, out of the ordinary, 
their average liaul being about four hundred 
bushels daily. 

Besides his oyster business Mr. Hand has 
also been interested in the bicycle trade for 
the past four years, employing his son to man- 
age that department of his business for iiim. 
He is now one of the oldest and foremost men 
in that line in this section of the State. He 
has been agent for the Columbia bicycles from 
the time he started in to handle wheels. Mr. 
Hand has off and on made quite a number of 
investments in real estate in tiie town of Port 
Norris, ami now owns considerable land in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



307 



and around it, including a fine dwelling-house, 
which he built, and which is fully supplied 
with all modern improvements, including a 
windmill and tank for water. 

Mr. Hand has been a member of the Town- 
shi[) Committee, an ofifice which he held for 
the period of one year, that being the only 
elective office to which he ever accepted a 
nomination. He was appointed Postmaster of 
Port Norris in November, 1893, under Cleve- 
land. This is the most important postal sta- 
tion in the county outside of the cities of 
Bridgeton, . Millville, and Vineland. Mr. 
Hand's son Morton helps him in the routine 
of office work as Assistant Postmaster. Mr. 
Hand has been a member of the Democratic 
fCxecutive Committee of the county for twelve 
years, and he still holds that position. 

On the lOth of June, 1877, he was united 
in marriage with Arabella, daughter of Henry 
Lee, of Port Norris. Four children were 
born of this marriage, of whom but three sur- 
vive: Morton, who is Assistant Postmaster; 
Stella; and Leon. 

The whole family attend and sujjport wisely 
and heartily the Methodist Episcopal Church 
of Port Norris, of which Mrs. Hand is a de- 
vout member; and Mr. Hand's generosity 
helped to build the new church edifice. 



B 



AVID HITCHNER, a respected 
(^ J farmer of Hopewell, was born in this 
town, near the farm whicii he now 
occupies, February 4, 1845, being a son of 
David J. and Anna (Brown) Hitchner. He 



received his education in the common .schools 
of Lower Hopewell. He continued to reside 
at home, engaged in general agricultural work, 
until his marriage, April 19, 1883, to Mi.ss 
Ella L. Sharp. She is a daughter of Lorenzo 
and Jane (Peterson) Sharp, and was born in 
Mauricetown, this county. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hitchner are the parents of three children — 
Alma T., Franklin Sharp, and Jennie D. 
They are Presbyterians in religion, being 
members of the church of that denomination 
in Greenwich. 




ARRISON PERRY, a prosperous gen- 
eral farmer of Down township, N.J., 
was born in Bridgeton, December 
14, 1828, son of John and Amanda (Du Bois) 
Perry. Mr. Perry's grandfather, Jeremiah 
Perry, was probably a native of Cape May. 
He learned the trade of a wheelwright, which 
he followed successfully upon his own ac- 
count, and was one of the active business men 
of his day in Cape May. He was a high- 
minded, intelligent, and patriotic citizen, who 
is thought to have served in the War of 1812. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church. 
He married Sarah Crandall, a native of Cape 
May, and they reared a family of five chil- 
dren, as follows: Samuel; Sarah, who became 
the wife of George Erety, of I'hiladelphia ; 
John; Rachel, who married Elijah Winslow, 
of Philadelphia; and Elizabeth, who married 
Joshua Lewis, of Blakely, Pa. 

John Perry, son of Jeremiah and Sarah 
(Crandall) Perry, was born in Cape May 
County, April 19, 1795. He learned the 



3o8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



wheelwright's trade with his father, remaining 
with him till he became of age, and after mar- 
riage removed to Bridgeton, where he carried 
on quite an extensive business for the rest of 
his life, employing apprentices and journey- 
men. He died March 12, 1832. As an in- 
dustrious business man and a worthy, upright 
citizen, he was highly respected; and for many 
years he was one of the most prominent resi- 
dents of Bridgeton. His wife, Amanda Du 
Bois, whom he married March 10, 18 19, be- 
came the mother of five children, three of 
whom grew to maturity, namely: Francis; 
Sarah, who died at the age of seventeen years; 
and Harrison, the subject of this sketch. 

Mrs. Amanda Du Bois Perry was born in 
Pitt's Grove, Salem County, in 1791, and 
died August 20, 1884. She was a daughter of 
Thomas Du Bois. The family is of French 
Huguenot extraction, and descends from Louis 
Du Bois, who was born in France about the 
year 1630. To escape from religious persecu- 
tion he emigrated to America in 1660, settling 
at what is now Kingston, N.Y. His wife 
was Catherine Blanson or ]51ansbon, a native 
of France. (For further details see "Record 
of the Family of Louis Du Bois," press of 
John C. Clark & Co., i860, reprinted by 
Pierce & Budlong of Providence, R.I.) Jacob 
Du Bois, son of Louis, who was born in 
America in 1661, married Gerritje Gerritsen, 
and died in 1745. Louis Du Bois, son of 
■Jacob, was born in Hurley, N.Y. , January 6, 
1695. He moved to West Jersey, where he 
acquired a tract of land containing ten hundred 
and ninety-one acres, situated upon AUoway's 



Creek. He was one of the original members 
of the first Presbyterian congregation ever as- 
sembled in this section, which met at what 
was afterward named Pitt's Grove township, 
in honor of Sir William Pitt. He married 
Margaret Jansen on May 2, 1720, and reared a 
family of eleven children. He died in 1784. 
Peter Du Bois, eighth child and fifth son of 
Levi Du Bois, and maternal great-grandfather 
of Harrison Perry, was born in Pitt's Grove 
township, Salem County, April 10, 1734. 
He served in the Revolutionary War as a 
Lieutenant of a company commanded by his 
cousin, Jacob Du Bois ; and he was afterward 
promoted to the rank of Captain. He in- 
herited one-fifth of his father's estate, and re- 
sitlcd in Pitt's Grove until his death. About 
the year 175S he married Amy Greenman, who 
was born in Stratford, Conn., October 24, 
1727. Their seven children were: Joel, Jere- 
miah, Sarah, Thomas, Samuel, Uriah, and 
Amy. Peter Du Bois died May 21, 1795; 
and his wife died June 2, 1S07. 

Thomas Du Bois, Mr. Perry's maternal 
grandfather, was born in Pitt's Grove town- 
ship, July 16, 1764. He was educated in the 
common schools and reared to farm life, which 
was his occupation during his active period. 
He was noted as a teacher of sacred and ora- 
torio music, some times having as many as six 
classes a week during the winter season; and 
he also acted as drum-major, l^right and so- 
cial, as well as talented in music, he was 
much sought after by all lovers of wit and 
harmless pleasantry, his humor, which was 
original and spontaneous, being refined and of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



309 



a nature that could not create displeasure nor 
give offence. His native powers were devoted 
to the good of his fellow-men; and he had a 
large number of friends and acquaintances, 
who regarded him with the most sincere love 
and admiration. Although he was a strong 
supporter of the Whig party in national poli- 
tics, he always voted for the candidate whom 
he considered most capable and worthy of 
holding local office. He was actively identi- 
fied with public affairs until his death, which 
took place in Bridgeton, December 12, 1845, 
at the age of eighty-two years. His wife, for- 
merly Sarah Foster, became the mother of 
seven children, namely: Charlotte; Peter; 
Amanda, Mr. Perry's mother; Maria; Phoebe; 
Ephraim; and Daniel. 

Harrison Perry, the subject of this sketch, 
attended the common schools of Bridgeton in 
his childhood and youth; and, after completing 
his studies, he became an employee at the 
Cumberland Nail and Iron Works in Bridge- 
ton, where he remained for ten years. He 
then settled upon a farm in Deerfield town- 
ship, where he resided for five years. In 1870 
he bought his present property in Dividing 
Creek, to the cultivation of which he has since 
devoted his entire time and energies. He 
owns sixty acres of excellent tillage land, 
which under his able management produces 
bountiful crops, including garden truck and 
strawberries; and he derives a good income 
from these products. He keeps an average of 
eighteen head of cattle and several work 
horses, has raised some fine colts, and for- 
merly made a specialty of raising poultry. 



On September 8, 1853, Mr. Perry was mar- 
ried to Hannah Paul 1 in, daughter of Lemuel 
Paullin, of Bridgeton. Of the nine children 
born to this union, seven lived to grow up, 
and are as follows: Laura, wife of David 
Turner, of Hall County, Nebraska; Francis 
M.; Albert; Alexander; Elizabeth, wife of 
Enoch Locke, of Dividing Creek; William; 
and Alice. 

In [lolitics Mr. Perry is an ardent Prohibi- 
tionist. Although not an aspirant for jniblic 
notoriety, he was forced by his friends and 
political associates to accept the office of Com- 
missioner, of Appeals, which he ably filled for 
some time. He has been officially connected 
with the Baptist church for several years, and 
Mrs. Perry is also an active member. 



^TiDWARD DUFFIELD FLEETWOOD, 
t_ a respected and prominent citizen of 
Dividing Creek, Down township, Cumberland 
County, N.J., holding office as a Notary Pub- 
lic and a Justice of the Peace, is a native resi- 
dent. He is a son of George F. and Sarah A. 
(Gandy) F"leetwood, and was born March 21, 
1846. 

His great-grandfather, Thomas Fleetwood, 
Sr. , was a native of Smyrna, Del., where he 
was engaged in general husbandry. One of 
the children born to him anil his wife, Miriam, 
was Thomas, Jr., who was born in Smyrna, 
Del. He was a farmer by occupation, and at 
the time of the second war with England he 
served his country as a private in the army. 
He married Miss Clarissa Foster, and they 



3IO 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



were blessed with a large family of children, 
six of whom, three sons and three daughters, 
attained to maturity ; namely, Rachel, George 
F., Thomas T., Maria, Jeremiah C, and 
Mary C. Thomas Fleetwood, Jr., departed 
this life in June, 1865, at the advanced age of 
seventy-four years; and his wife died in 1880, 
aged about eighty years. 

George F. Fleetwood was born in Dividing 
Creek, April 25, 1821, and enjoyed in his 
youth such educational advantages as the com- 
mon schools of his native town then afforded. 
Remaining at the paternal home until he be- 
came of age, he then engaged in agricultural 
pursuits on shares upon his father's farm. 
He later purchased a threshing machine, oper- 
ated by horse-power, which was one of the first 
endless-chain machines ever owned in the 
southern part of Cumberland County ; and for 
several years he travelled with it, performing 
work by engagement here and there as far 
north as Bridgeton. In 1865 he bought a 
farm at Dividing Creek of about four hundred 
acres, which comprised considerable salt 
marsh, meadow, and woodland. He kept 
about one hundred acres under cultivation, his 
principal crops being wheat, corn, hay, and 
sweet potatoes. He also raised considerable 
poultry for those days, and he likewise kept 
from fifteen to twenty head of cattle. He 
conducted the farm until about 1S83, when he 
retired from husbandry, seeking relief from its 
cares and arduous labors; and for five or si.x 
years he ran a poultry wagon of his own, his 
farm, however, being simultaneously operated 
on shares. 



On March 11, 1843, Mr. George F. Fleet- 
wood was united in wedlock with Miss Sarah 
A., a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim 
Gandy, of Dividing Creek. Her grandfather, 
Thomas Gandy, with his brother David, served 
in the Revolutionary War. The latter sus- 
tained a severe wound from a ball passing 
through his hand, on account of which he re- 
ceived a pension from the national govern- 
ment. Thomas participated also in the War 
of 18 1 2, enlisting from Dividing Creek. 
Mrs. I'leetwood's father, Ephraim Gandy, was 
born in P'airfield township, Cumberland 
County, N.J. He wedded Miss Sarah Lee, of 
Down township, where she was born Decem- 
ber 25, 1772, and they became the parents of 
ten children, seven of whom attained to matu- 
rity, namely: Deborah; Mary; Rachel; John; 
Ruth; Edward; and Sarah A., who is now 
Mrs. Fleetwood. Religiously, both Mr. and 
Mrs. Gandy were in fellowship with the Bap- 
tist Church of Dividing Creek. The former 
reached the goodly age of seventy-four years, 
passing away about 1856, and the latter in 
1832. Seven of the ten children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. George F. Fleetwood have grown to 
maturity, namely: Edward Duffield ; Eve 
Anna, who is the wife of Timothy Turner, ol 
Dividing Creek; Eleazar; George; Nehe- 
miah; Theodore; and Clara, now deceased, 
who was married to Lemuel P. Sloan, of 
Greenwich, N.J. 

Mr. George F. Fleetwood has taken an ac- 
tive interest in local politics; and for four 
years at various times he has served his fel- 
low-citizens, whose cordial esteem and confi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



311 



dehce he has long enjoyed, in the capacity of 
Overseer of the Highways. He and his wife 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Dividing Creek, in which the for- 
mer officiates in the responsible capacity of 
Trustee and steward. In its work his wife 
also freely participates, and for ten years has 
acted as a class leader. For a number of years 
Mrs. Fleetwood has also been actively identi- 
fied with the temperance work, and she has 
been the President of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union at Dividing Creek from 
the date of its organization. 

Edward DuflReld Fleetwood acquired his 
early education in the public schools of his 
native town. At the termination of his 
schooling he devoted his attention to oyster- 
ing, in which he continued until about 1886, 
meanwhile for two winters engaging in school 
teaching. During a portion of this time, in 
which he was exposed to the dangers of the 
deep, he was the captain of a vessel; and, 
while he commanded the two-masted schooner 
"Ida," he experienced a gale in which the 
boat was blown ashore. Being engaged dur- 
ing the spring of 1862 in oystering in Chesa- 
peake Bay he on a certain Sunday landed, to 
attend divine worship in a church at what is 
now Chrisfield. On returning to his boat he 
was taken prisoner, on the charge of being a 
deserter from the army, but, succeeding in 
proving his identity, he was released. 

In June, 1868, Mr. Fleetwood was united 
in matrimony with Miss Victoria, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Garrison, of Dividing Creek. 
Into their home have come four children, two 



of whom are still spared to them, namely: 
William S., who, socially, is affiliated with 
the Order of Odd Fellows in Social Lodge, 
No. 168, at Dividing Creek, in which he is a 
Noble Grand ; and Carrie. 

Mr. Fleetwood has been very closely identi- 
fied with the life and activity of the commu- 
nity, both civic and social ; and he has offici- 
ated in several public capacities. In 1885 he 
was constituted a member of the Township 
Committee, on which he served by successive 
re-elections until 1S90, when he resigned, hav- 
ing been appointed a Justice of the Peace. 
To this latter ofiice he was re-appointed in 
1895, and in 1890 he was also made a Notary 
Public. In 1893 he was elected Commis- 
sioner of Public Deeds, and he is now the fire 
insurance agent. Mr. Fleetwood has also for 
one term been a member of the Executive 
Committee of the township. 

Socially, Mr. Fleetwood is associated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being 
a member of Social Lodge, No. 168, at Divid- 
ing Creek, of which he is a Past Grand. 
He also fraternizes with the Junior Order of 
United American Mechanics, belonging to 
Purity Lodge, No. 206, at Dividing Creek, 
in which he fills the position of F"inancial 
Secretary. In national politics he lends his 
earnest and vigorous support to the Repub- 
lican party, and has served as a delegate to 
nearly all of its recent county and Con- 
gressional conventions. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Fleetwood are members of the Baptist Church 
of Dividing Creek, in which he has officiated 
as a Trustee. 



312 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^ENJAMIN F. LADD, the editor 
^^iS and proprietor of tlie Vineland Even- 
ing Journal, and also a member of 
the well-known firm of Ladd & Steele, dealers 
in real estate and insurance, was born May 4, 
1855, in Appleton, Wis., son of Harvey 
Hammond and Liicinda B. (Perry) Ladd. 
The preceding generations of the family were 
successively represented by Samuel Ladd,- 
John, David, Jeremiah, Cyrus, Chester, and 
Harvey. Samuel, the founder, came from 
England in 1649, and settled in Haverhill, 
Mass. He was a soldier in King Charles's 
army, and fought against Cromwell. Ches- 
ter Ladd, the grandfather of Benjamin F., 
was born in Burlington, N.Y., in 1795. He 
subsequently moved to Pennsylvania, and then 
to Rockford, ni., where he spent the rest of 
his life. He was a pioneer farmer of Rock- 
ford, and served the community in the capac- 
ity of preacher. His wife's maiden name was. 
Harriet Hammond. 

Harvey Hammond Ladd, the father of the 
subject of this narrative, was born May 22, 
1825, in Burlington, N.Y. After spending 
his early life there, in the neighborhood of Bur- 
lington Green, he removed to the oil district 
of Pennsylvania prior to 1840, before the dis- 
covery of oil entitled it to that name. There 
he lived on Oil Creek, where Oil City now 
stands, and taught school. At a later date he 
went to Belvidere, 111., where he learned the 
carpenter's trade, l-'rom that place he moved 
to Appleton, Wis., then a mere village, and 
became interested in lumber dealing and saw- 
mills. A man of very temperate habits, he 



was one of the early members of the Sons of 
Temperance. In 1865 he came to Vineland, 
when it was a new town, and lived here for 
many years, in the course of which he was 
able to render efficient service to the commu- 
nity as School Trustee. He went to Chicago 
or a suburb of that city in 1879, and died 
there in the year following. He had retired 
from the activities of life some time pre- 
viously. His intellectual and moral qualities 
obtained him respect wherever he went. Be- 
sides the filling of the office of School Trustee, 
he also served in the public capacities of 
Alderman, Justice of the Peace, and Commis- 
sioner of Deeds. In 1850 he was united in 
marriage to Miss Lucinda D. Perry, daughter 
of Benjamin F. and Abigail (Newland) Perry. 
Mr. Perry's father was a Revolutionary soldier 
and a cousin of Commodore Perry of Lake 
Erie fame. Mrs. Harvey H. Ladd, who was 
born in 1830, still lives in Vineland. 

Benjamin F. Ladd received the foundation 
of his education in a little village named 
Stevensville, where the family lived two or 
three years before going to Appleton. He 
also attended the Appleton schools, but com- 
pleted his course of study at the Vineland 
High School. His business career began in 
the office of the \'ineland Weekly, where he 
learned the mechanical part of newspaper 
work. Afterward he and Obert Spencer, who 
was in the same office, purchased the Vine- 
land Journal, which had been started in the 
spring of 1875, but had not been successfully 
managed. One year later Mr. Latid bought 
out his partner, and has since conducted it 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•^13 



alone. At its inception the paper liad a very 
limited circulation, but by dint of hard work 
and perseverance, it now has a fine circulation 
for a town of this size. It is not only the old- 
est daily now published in the State south of 
Trenton, but it is the only one left out of the 
dozen that have been started in Vineland. 
The publication is a six-column folio, except 
on .Saturday, when the amount of reading 
matter is doubled. It is recognized as one of 
the leading papers in Southern New Jersey, 
and owing to its large urban and suburban 
circulation it is deemed an excellent advertis- 
ing medium. 

In 1886 Mr. Ladd added a real estate and 
insurance business to his other interests. 
The firm name was Ladd & Spencer until the 
death of the latter. Then Thomas 15. Steele 
was received into partnership, since which 
the firm has been known as Ladd & Steele. 
One of the oldest agencies of the kind, 
it represents seven prominent insurance com- 
panies. Mr. Ladd was one of the organ- 
izers of the Tradesman's Bank of Vineland, 
and has been one of its Directors from the be- 
ginning. He erected the buildings used for 
the printing and insurance business, and has 
been actively interested in other real estate 
business. He formed one subdivision, divid- 
ing twenty-five acres and opening up Colum- 
bia Avenue. In politics he has always been a 
stanch Democrat, and the Jo/nyia/ has reflected 
his sentiments in regard to party issues. He 
is not an aspirant to political honors. For 
cpiite a while he was a member of the Na- 
tional Guards of New Jersey and for several 



years the President of the Vineland Board of 
Trade. 

On November 23, 1878, Mr. Ladd was 
united in marriage to Miss Julia M. Gifford, 
who was a native of New Bedford, Mass. 
Her father, Chester C. Gifford, a contractor 
and builder, moved to Vineland in early man- 
hood. Mr. Ladd has now four children — 
Charles Franklin, George Chester, Mary 
Belle, and Edward Harvey. Although not 
members, Mr. and Mrs. Ladd most frequently 
attend the Presbyterian church. Their pleas- 
ant home, corner of Landis and Columbia 
Avenues, was erected by Mr. Ladd. 



^OHN COLLINS HAND, Collector of 
Commercial township, was born in 
Philadelphia, May 10, 1848, son of 
Thomas and Mary A. (Collins) Hand. His 
grandfather, Jeremiah Hand, was a resident 
of Cape May County, and was probably born 
there. His maternal grandfather, John Col- 
lins, was captain of a vessel, and was lost at 
sea, February 14, 1846. 

Thomas Hand was born November 29, 181 8, 
at West Creek, Cape May County, N.J. , and 
lived there till twelve years of age, when he 
went to sea. He was but a little lad when his 
father died, and he early began to help his 
mother support the family. When seventeen 
years old he was master of a boat running 
from Maurice River to Philadelphia. At 
that time the country was sparsely settled, and 
the town of Commercial was not in existence. 
Thomas Hand sailed for Richard Robbins 



3'4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



until able to purchase a boat of his own, and 
eventually became owner of several vessels. 
He purchased a large tract of land at Port 
Norris, which was then a hamlet of twenty 
houses ; and to his enterprise much of the early 
growth of that place is attributable. In Octo- 
ber, 1850, he moved to Port Norris, and 
shortly opened a grocery store and engaged in 
ship-chandlery, ship-building and repairing 
vessels. He was owner of the only marine 
railway in the town, and also built a number 
of houses, many of which he sold. At the 
time of his death he was owner of eighteen 
houses and eight thousand acres of improved 
and marsh land. 

Mr. Thomas Hand was eminently Icind- 
hearted and generous, and during the oyster 
war of 1871 he did much for the poor, hiring 
a number of men, not because he needed them, 
but because they needed help; and, though 
owning an interest in several oyster beds, he 
took no active part in the hostilities. He 
was a stanch Republican politically, and was 
one of the strong men on the Board of Free- 
holders, of whicli he was a member some fifteen 
years. His death, which occurred November 
5, 1890, was universally regretted. Mrs. 
Mary A. Collins Hand was born June 9, 1824, 
and died October 5, 1885. She was the 
mother of seven children, namely: Mary E., 
who lived but four years; Caroline, wife of 
Samuel S. Ferguson; John Collins, the 
special subject of this sketch; Mary J., wife 
of Henry S. Robbins; Thomas; Anna M. ; 
and Joseph. The two latter are now deceased. 

John Collins Hand acquired his early edu- 



cation at Port Norris, supplementing it by a 
two years' course of study at the West Jersey 
Academy in Bridgeton. He finished his 
schooling in 1866, and went to work as a 
clerk in his father's store, remaining till 
1873. In that year he built at Bivalve, where 
he was the second man to build, and opened a 
ship-chandler's shop there, where he carried 
on a successful business until 1879. Then, 
forming a partnership with William H. Town- 
send, he engaged heavily in oyster planting 
and shipping, his trade bringing in from fifty 
thousand to seventy-five thousand dollars a 
year, and extending all over the country; but, 
being his father's executor, he had so much 
work to do in settling the estate that he was 
obliged to retire from the oyster business at 
the end of a year. He, however, retained his 
interest in the boats, the house scows, and 
floats, and the oyster-house, and, now that the 
estate is settled, is again planting and ship- 
ping. When he was actively engaged in the 
business he was one of the largest planters 
and shippers here. Mr. Hand also owns his 
handsome home and considerable real estate. 
December 19, 1868, Mr. Hand was married 
to Miss Anna B. Bacon, daughter of The- 
ophilus Bacon, a builder by trade, an old resi- 
dent of Dividing Creek. Nine daughters have 
blessed their union: Edessa, wife of Daviil R. 
Sutton, of Glassboro, and mother of two chil- 
dren — Leroy and John ; Hannah, wife of Jo- 
seph P. Gibson, of Port Norris, who is asso- 
ciated with Mr. Hand in the oyster business; 
Ada; Mary A.; Lucy B. ; Fannie; Julia; 
Anna; and Caroline. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3^5 



Mr. Hand has for years been active in poli- 
tics as a Republican. He is now in his eigh- 
teenth year as Collector, having served fifteen 
terms of one year each and one term of three 
years without a break; and he has served 
as delegate to county, senatorial, Congres- 
sional, and State conventions. In 1889, dur- 
ing President Harrison's administration, he 
was appointed Postmaster, and held the office 
four years, improving the mail service during 
his incumbency. He was a member of the 
County Board of Registry in 1892 and 1893, 
and was a member of the Republican County 
Committee for a number of years. Prominent 
also in social matters, Mr. Hand was Treas- 
urer of Social Lodge, No. 168, of Dividing 
Creek, for si.\ years, and is a member of Port 
Norris Lodge, No. y^^. Knights of Pythias, of 
which he was Treasurer eight years, and is 
now Past Chancellor. He belongs to Idaho 
Tribe, No. 51, Improved Order of Red Men, 
in which he was Keeper of Wampum seven 
years. He attends and helps to support the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which his 
wife is a member; and he has aided liberally 
in building the new church and parsonage. 
Mr. Hand, like his father, is generous and 
kind-hearted, always willing to help men in 
need of aid, and is known as the friend of all. 



(STheq 



HEODORE F. DAVIS, a member of 

ejj_ the well-known firm of Davis, Rainear 

& Davis, fruit and vegetable canners of 

Shiloh, was born in Cumberland County, this 

village, August 20, 1844, son of Jarman A. 



and Eliza (Bivins) Davis. Samuel B. Davis, 
the grandfather of Theodore V., was born in 
Hopewell township. He was a farmer by oc- 
cupation and an active citizen, ever ready to 
promote the interests of the town in which he 
resided. Jarman A. Davis was a native of 
this township. He acquired his education in 
the district schools, and subsequently taught 
school during the winters and worked on the 
farm summers until attaining his majority. 
He then by inheritance came into possession 
of a farm, which he carried on for the rest of 
his life. He was prominent in local affairs, 
serving on the Township Committee, as Con- 
stable for some years, Surveyor of the High- 
way, and Justice of the Peace, which last- 
named office he held until his death. He 
also filled other positions in the gift of his 
fellow-townsmen. 

His wife, Eliza, was a daughter of Joseph 
Bivins. She became the mother of seven 
children, namely: Elizabeth, who died in in- 
fancy; Sarah, who married Charles Socwell, 
of Down township; Harriet B., who became 
the wife of John G. Hummel, of Philailel- 
phia; Charlotte E., who married Richard 
Howell, of Stoe Creek township; Sophronia, 
who is the wife of Louis Schaible, and resides 
in Salem County; Thomas B. ; and Theodore 
F. The parents were members of the Seventh 
Day Baptist church, in which Theodore F. is 
chorister. 

Theodore F. Davis was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and at Union Academy, and sub- 
sequently taught school for a number of years. 
When he was twenty-two years old he bought 



3i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



a farm, which he successfully managed until 
about 1880. He then opened a store of gen- 
eral merchandise in Shiloh, and continued 
there for six years. In 1 886, with Harrison 
VV. Davis and James R. Rainear, he started 
in the canning business, at first in a limited 
way. A firm composed of three such enter- 
prising men necessarily flourished, and the 
business was soon established on a permanent 
basis. They have continued to thrive, and 
now put up about five hundred thousand cans 
of tomatoes annually, besides fruits and other 
vegetables in proportion. Like his public- 
spirited father, Mr. Davis has been largely 
identified with local affairs. In 1889 he was 
elected Justice of the Peace, and was re- 
elected in 1894 for five years. He officiated 
for a long period as Clerk of the township, 
and he has long been a member of the Town 
Committee. Mr. Davis belongs to the local 
Masonic Lodge, and while a farmer was a 
member of the grange. On February 20, 
1867, he married Eliza S., daughter of Jere- 
miah B. Davis, of .Shiloh. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis have had four children, only two of 
whom are living: Isadore J., the wife of 
Wilson S. Davis; and Walter B. Davis, both 
of whom are worthy representatives of the 
name they bear. 




)EWLS H. ROBBINSON. superintend- 
ent of the .South Jersey Traction 
Company, was born in Dividing 
Creek, Cumberland County, N.J., on August 
14, 1871. He is a son of William G. and 
Rebecca (Chew) Robbinson. The father of 



Lewis H., William G. Robbinson, was an old 
resident of the county, being a planter and one 
of the most prominent men there. For many 
years he was engaged in the oyster business, 
but he is now a retired gentleman. He mar- 
ried Miss Chew, daughter of the Rev. Jonas 
Chew, a Methodist minister. Of the six chil- 
dren born to Mr. and Mrs. William G. Rob- 
binson, there are living: Laura, wife of 
A. R. Perry, of Dividing Creek; Hannah 
Lucretia, wife of Professor G. S. Minch, prin- 
cipal of the public schools of Dividing Creek; 
Bessie; and Paul. The father and mother are 
valued members of the Methodist church, in 
which Mr. Robbinson has officiated as steward, 
taking an active interest for many years. 

Lewis H. Robbinson supplemented the in- 
struction received in the schools of his native 
town by attending night schools in Atlantic 
City and Wheeling, W. Va., while he was in 
the employ of the Citizens' Railway Com- 
pany. There he gained a knowledge of elec- 
tricity as applied to railways. When he was 
but eighteen years of age he was appointed 
electrician at Wheeling, being on dut\' in the 
day-time and studying nights. He had a long 
line to take charge of, there being seventeen 
miles of railway operated. Later he was 
called to Carbondale, Pa., to serve as 
chief engineer and electrician, having charge 
of the power house as well as tiie electric 
lines. Four months afterward Mr. Robbinson 
had an offer to go on the road for the Mather 
Electric Company of Philadelphia, travelling 
for them Flast and South, installing isolated 
lines. He accepted the offer of the South 




LEWIS H. ROBBINSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



319 



Jersey Traction Company, which controls all 
of the South Jersey Traction Company lines, 
Bridgeton & Millville Railroad, Bridgeton 
and Millville turnpike, and Bridgeton and 
Deerfield turnpike, including seventeen miles 
of railway and sixteen miles of turnpike, 
being the longest line in South Jersey. It 
requires a working force of from thirty-five to 
forty men and frequently in winter a large 
number of laborers, besides ten extra cars in 
summer. Mr. Robbinson is a member of Co- 
hansey Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. On December 19, 1894, he was united 
in marriage to Miss Cora Irvin, of Ogdens- 
burg, N.Y. 

"OSEPH COOK, who is now living re- 
tired from active business pursuits in 
Vineland, N.J., was born in Cheshire, 
l']ngland, on August 18, 1834, during the 
reign of William IV. His parents were 
Jacob and Mary (Murray) Cook. Jacob, his 
father, was born in Cheshire about 1797. He 
received a substantial education, and remained 
on the farm with his parents until attaining 
his majority. He then took a farm with a 
grist-mill on it, and managed both success- 
fully during the rest of his life. His wife, 
Mary, wlio was a daughter of Joseph Murray, 
became the mother of six children, namely: 
Lucy (deceased), who married John Berris- 
ford, of Cheshire; Emma (deceased), who 
married James Willett, of Cheshire; Mary 
(deceased), who became the wife of Charles 
Moody, also of Cheshire; Martha, who mar- 
ried Thomas Growcott, of Cheshire; Harriet 



(deceased), who married James Skeldon, also 
of Cheshire; and Joseph, the special subject 
of this sketch. The family were members of 
the Church of England. 

Joseph Cook, after receiving his education 
in the schools of his native town, entered tiie 
employ of the London & North Wales Rail- 
road Company, with which he remained in 
various capacities until 1877, when he occu- 
pied the post of cashier. He then associated 
himself in imsiness with his brother-in-law, 
James, in New York City, under the firm 
name of Everall Brothers, their place being 
located on the corner of Broadway and Fifth 
Avenue. There they established a tailoring 
business, which they carried on with signal 
success for four years, when Mr. Cook sold out 
to his brother-in-law, and located in Jan\-ier, 
N.J., where he built a factory for the manu- 
facture of Smyrna rugs. This enterprise pros- 
pered; and Mr. Cook employed about fifty 
men, turning out about one hundred and fifty 
rugs a day. After continuing the factory^for 
six years and a half, Mr. Cook let the property 
on lease in 1892, and came to Vineland to 
retire from active pursuits. He was married 
on September 21, 1873, to Lucy Homer, a 
daughter of William Homer, of Staffordshire, 
England. They have had one child, h'.liza- 
beth, who met with a tragic death, bein"; 
killed by a runaway horse when she was but 
six and a half years old. Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
are believers in Christian Science. 

Mr. Cook well deserves the rest and repose 
in his declining years which his diligence in 
business has rendered possible. 



320 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•OHN F. WATSON, a leading hard- 
ware and harness dealer of Bridgeton, 
was born in Greenwich township, Cum- 
berland County, N.J., on June 29, 1855. He 
is descended from Thomas Watson, who set- 
tled in Greenwich in 1685. Thomas Watson 
had a son, William, who was born in 1690, 
and died in 1743. There was born to Will- 
iam a son named Isaac. Isaac Watson became 
the father of a son named Howell; and to 
Howell Watson there was born a son, George, 
and to George a son, Charles L. , who was the 
father of the subject of this sketch. 

Charles L. Watson, the father of John F., 
was also a native of Greenwich, N.J., born on 
August 8, 1823. He received a common- 
school education, and became a farmer, follow- 
ing that occupation till within five years of 
his death, when he retired from life's activi- 
ties. He died in July, 1894. He was prom- 
inent in local politics, and served the town as 
Constable and County Sheriff, being elected 
Sheriff in November, 1863. During his term 
of office Mowaril and (^gden were convicted of 
nnu'iler, and executed. 

Mr. Cliarles L. Watson married Ann B. 
Hall, a daughter of Gabriel Hall, of Green- 
wich. Tiiey hatl thirteen childi'cn, of whom 
l)ut five lived to maturity; namely, George L., 
]{lizaheth L., John !•"., Calvin II., and Leon- 
ard L. The parents were members of the 
Baptist church. 

John F. Watson obtained his education in 
the public schools and at South Jersey Insti- 
tute. He then woiked for a short time in a 
grocery store, but subsequently entered the 



employ of J. H. Elmer, a hardware merchant. 
He remained with Mr. Elmer until March i, 
1887, at which time he became a partner of 
W. J. Brooks, under the firm name of Brooks 
& Watson; and they began to deal in hardware 
in addition to the harness business. On De- 
cember 31, 1893, Mr. Brooks retired, selling 
his interest to Mr. Watson, who has since 
continued the business alone with satisfactory 
results. On September 26, 1888, Mr. Wat- 
son was united in marriage to A. Maud 
Reeves, a daughter of Josiah H. Reeves, of 
this city. Two children are the fruit of their 
union — J. Reeves, born December 26, 1890; 
and Alice Maud, born May 18, 1892. Mr. 
and Mrs. Watson are members of the P'irst 
Baptist Church of Bridgeton, in which he has 
been superintendent of the Sunday-school fif- 
teen years, clerk of the parish ten years, and 
Secretary of the Board of Deacons. He is a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the West 
New Jersey Baptist Association, of which he 
is Chairman. He is also a member of the 
Board of Managers of the Baptist State Con- 
vention of New Jersey; member of the l^oard 
of Managers of the South Jersey Institute, 
Bridgeton; Treasurer of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, Bridgeton; member of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Bridgeton branch of the State 
Mutual Builfling and Loan Association of 
New Jersey, of which he is Treasurer; and 
member of the city Board of Education from 
the First Ward, Bridgeton, N.J. To the per- 
formance of his multifarious duties Mr. Wat- 
son brings earnestness of purpose, a clear and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



321 



sagacious mind, long business experience, and 
a firm reliance on an all-wise Providence. 




H^|ICHARD OSBORNE BIDWELL, a 

prosperous business man of South 
Vineland, was born in Springfield, 
R.I., March 16, 1863, son of Osborne and 
Caroline (Willis) Bidwell. 

Osborne Bidwell was a native of South 
Manchester, Conn., born August 8, 1827. 
He grew to manhood on his father's farm, 
receiving his education in the common 
schools. On attaining his majority he went 
to work in Colt's armory, and continued in 
that employment until after the close of the 
Civil War. In 1865 he came to South Vine- 
land, and bought a farm of thirty acres, which 
he successfully conducted for the remainder 
of his life. Shortly after entering upon pos- 
session of the property, he found on it a qual- 
ity of sand that was susceptible of being man- 
ufactured into the finest quality of glass. 
This he immediately began to take out, and 
readily obtained for it two and one-half dol- 
lars per ton, a price asserted to have been the 
highest ever paid in the State for similar ma- 
terial. This sand having yielded him a good 
profit while it lasted, he subsequently pur- 
chased, in company with C. W. Kilborn, an- 
other farm, also containing sand-beds, and 
continued the business. His wife, who was a 
daughter of Frank Willis, of South Manches- 
ter, Conn., bore him six children; namely, 
Richard O. , Hattie M., Jennie, Caroline, 
William, and Lillian. llattie M. married 



Henry Wiley, of New York City; Jennie 
married Frank Ward, of Vineland; Lillian 
is the wife of Lewis Miller, also of Vine- 
land; Caroline married Vernon McMadsan, 
of Vineland. Both parents were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. The 
father was a Free Mason of the Vineland 
Lodge. He died in February, 1890. 

Richard Osborne Bidwell, after receiving his 
education in the public schools of South Vine- 
land, began to contribute to his own living 
by working on his father's farm. On August 
31, 1889, he was able to buy Mr. Kilborn's 
interest in the sand business, which was then 
continued under the firm name of Bidwell & 
Son. Upon his father's death a share in the 
firm fell to his mother. This he bought July 
9, 1891, becoming thereby the sole proprietor. 
Of an enterprising spirit and possessed of a 
natural capacity for business, Mr. Bidwell 
soon became the largest dealer in glass 
sand in the State. He now conducts sand 
works in three different localities, having an 
average output of two hundred and ten tons 
per day. On May 31, 1884, he was united in 
matrimony with Elvira E., daughter of Ed- 
ward Homan, of Newburg, N. Y. The union 
has been blessed by the birth of six children, 
of whom three are deceased. The survivors 
are: Richard O., Jr., born July 9, 1885; 
Sadie E., born April 12, 1887; and Ralph 
W., born September 13, 1894. Both parents 
attend the Baptist church, of which the 
mother is a regular member. Mr. Bidwell 
belongs to Vineland Castle, No. 46, Knights 
of the Golden Eagle. He is a self-made man. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



owing little to mere good luck, but a good 
deal to the shrewdness, industry, and self-re- 
liance inherited from his father. There may 
be those wlio envy his success, but all must 
respect him for the qualities by which he has 
earned it. 




HARLE.S TOWNSEND GRASS- 
I MAN, of Bricksburg, Maurice River 
township, proprietor and manager of 
one of the largest farms in the vicinity of Port 
Elizabeth, N.J., was born in the last-named 
town, December 12, 1846. He is a son of 
Edward and Rachel (Errickson) Grassman, 
both natives of the State of New Jersey. His 
grandfather, John Grassman, who was born in 
Germany, came to this country when about 
fifteen years old, and settled at Cumberland 
P'urnace, spending the rest of his life in this 
vicinity. He managed a general store, and 
was fairly successful as a merchant. John 
Gra.ssman married Abigail Winnerman, and 
reared two children — Edward and Samuel. 

Edward Grassman was born in Port Eliza- 
beth, May 22, 1 818, and obtained his educa- 
tion in the public schools of that place. He 
chose the pursuit of agriculture as a means of 
earning a livelihood, and was also engaged 
for a number of years in teaming on his own 
account. One of the prominent citizens of 
Port Elizabeth, he served for a number of 
years as Overseer of the Highways and Over- 
seer of the Poor. He was married in 1844 to 
Rachel, daughter of Goen Errickson, of Del- 
mont, Cumberland County, N.J. She died in 
1856, having been the mother of six children, 



namely: Abigail, wife of Charles Gilliland; 
Charles T., the subject of this sketch; Sally; 
Samuel; Eli; and John, who died in infancy. 
Mr. Grassman was again married in i860. 
Miss Mary Johnson becoming his wife. By 
this union he had two children — EdwartI and 
Mary. 

Charles Townsend Grassman was educated 
in the public schools of his native town. 
After leaving school he worked on a farm for 
monthly wages for a while, and then followed 
the sea for two years. About 1S68 he took a 
farm at Manantico, which he worked on shares 
for twenty-four years, or until 1892, when he 
purchased his present homestead. This com- 
prises one hundred and seventeen acres of 
good land, which is all under cultivation, the 
principal crops being corn, hay, and potatoes. 
Mr. Grassman cuts annually from forty to fifty 
tons of fresh hay; and he keeps about nineteen 
head of cattle, selling milk to retail dealers. 
He keeps a pair of horses for his own use, a 
pair of mules for heavy work, and has a valu- 
able colt sired by Pilot. His farm is one of 
the best in the locality, and thrift and enter- 
prise preside over the broad acres. 

December 25, 1870, he was united in mar- 
riage with Mary, daughter of Robert Gray, a 
native of County Antrim, Ireland. Nine 
children came to widen the family circle, only- 
three of whom are now living — Rachel, Ed- 
ward F., and Richard S. 

Mr. Grassman has served two years on the 
Elective Board of Port Elizabeth, and is at 
present a member of the Board of School 
Trustees. He belongs to the Methodist Epis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



copal church, while his wife is a Presbyterian. 
An industrious, thrifty, and law-abiding citi- 
zen, he has earned the respect of his fellow- 
townsmen. 



YI^ORTON LORE, Jr., a farmer and 
I — f wood dealer of Mauricetown, was born 
^•-^ in Buckshutem, November 5, 1850, 
son of Norton and Lucy H. C. (Mayhew) 
Lore. His great-grandfather, Jonathan Lore, 
who was the first of the family to settle in the 
district, built near Dividing Creek the house 
now known as Lore's Mill. His son, John 
Lore, was born at Lore's Mill, and there grew 
to manhood. He purchased a saw-mill at 
Newport, this county, and conducted it for 
several years. He then bought a farm at Di- 
viding Creek; but, after cultivating it for 
quite a period, he purchased another farm in 
Buckshutem. Here he resided for the re- 
mainder of his life engaged in general husban- 
dry. He was joined in matrimony with Miss 
Deborah Page, a daughter of David Page, who 
was the owner of both a farm and a mill at 
Newport. They had several children, three of 
whom still survive, namely: Norton, Sr., the 
father of the subject of this sketch; Deborah, 
who is now the wife of Joseph Mayhew, a resi- 
dent of Buckshutem; and Mary, residing at 
Millville, this county, the wife of Charles G. 
Leake. In religious faith and sympathy they 
were associated with the Baptist denomina- 
tion of Commercial, with whom they regularly 
attended divine worship. 

Norton Lore, Sr., was born at Newport, 
December 21, 1822. He acquired his educa- 



tion by attending first the common schools of 
Dividing Creek and then those of Commer- 
cial, to which town his father had removed. 
He remained with his parents until his mar- 
riage, vvlicn he engaged in farming and the 
wood business. In the latter he was engaged 
very extensively for many years. Every 
winter he employed from twenty-five to thirty 
men in felling trees and preparing hoops. 
The wood and hoops he shipped in his own 
vessel to Philadelphia. He held the contract 
to furnish the firewood that was supplied to 
the poor of .that city. He retired from busi- 
ness about twenty years ago. His chief occu- 
pation lately has been the management of a 
farm of seventy-five acres, where he keeps five 
head of cattle, and gives some attention to 
dairying. On February 7, 1844, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Lucy H. C. 
Mayhew, a daughter of Thomas Mayhew, of 
Commercial township. Two children were 
born of the marriage, namely: Caroline L. , 
now deceased, who married Maurice P. God- 
frey, of Dorchester, N.J., and had one child, 
Lewis; and Norton, Jr., the subject of this 
article. The father has taken an active in- 
terest in local politics as a member of the Re- 
publican i^arty. He has served the community 
for several years successively on the Town- 
ship Committee and the Committee of Ap- 
peals, and his party have sent him as a del- 
egate to several senatorial and Congressional 
conventions. 

Norton Lore, Jr., acquired a good practical 
education in the public schools of his native 
town. Afterward he worked with his father 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the wood business, first as assistant and, 
after coming of age, as partner, until liis mar- 
riage. He then dissolved the partnership, 
and purchased the farm which he now occu- 
pies. It is situated in the northern part of 
Buckshutem, and comprises eighty-five acres 
of arable land and four hundred acres of wood- 
land. On the woodland he employs a con- 
siderable number of men in felling and chop- 
ping wood, which he sells to the glass works 
at Millville. Besides this industry, which is 
carried on principally in the winter season, he 
is engaged in general agriculture. 

On March 12, 1873, he was joined in wed- 
lock with Miss Ada E. Vail, a daughter of 
John Vail, who was formerly a miller at 
Willow Grove, this county. Mrs. Lore was 
born December 28, 185 1, and received her 
education in Buckshutem, to which place her 
parents removed in 1861. The Vail family 
subsequently removed to Port Norris, where 
Mr. Vail was engaged in the lumber business. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lore have one child, Milton L., 
born August 22, 1880, who is now attending 
school. Mr. Lore is a Republican, and has 
participated quite freely in town affairs. He 
was a Trustee of the public schools for a time. 
At a later date he was appointed Commissioner 
of Appeals, and served in that capacity for 
several years. In 1890 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Township Committee. In 1893 he 
was re-elected, and since the decease of Seth 
Bowen he has acted as the Chairman of the 
committee. He has been a member of the 
Republican County Committee, and he has 
been Commercial's delegate to several county, 



district. Congressional, and senatorial con- 
ventions. He is a regular attendant and 
supporter of the Buckshutem Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, of which Mrs. Lore is a 
member. The family now occupy a nice 
residence at Buckshutem, built some time 
ago by Mr. Lore. 




APTAIN WILLIAM B. PEPPER, 
of Bivalve, a well-known planter and 
shipper of oysters, was born in Di- 
viding Creek, this county, June 17, 1838, the 
sixty-third anniversary of the battle of Bunker 
Hill. His parents were Captain Amos and 
Phoebe (Garrison) Pepper. He traces his 
genealogy to German ancestors who spelled 
the name Phifer. Jesse Pepper, his paternal 
grandfather, resided in Down township, was 
a sea captain, and was an early navigator cf 
the river and bay before 1800. When the 
breakwater was built, he was in the coasting 
trade, and assisted in carrying the stone for 
its construction. His son, Captairf Amos 
Pepper, was a native of Down townshij^, born 
in 1809. In early boyhood he shipped as cook 
on a coasting-vessel, which carried lumber 
from Maurice River to Philadelphia. Erom 
this humble position he worked upward with 
characteristic energy until he became captain 
and part owner of the vessel in which he 
sailed. He was a seafaring man for half a 
century. Seven or eight years previous to his 
death he retired from that calling, and there- 
after became identified in town affairs, officiat- 
ing as School Trustee and Overseer of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



Road. He married Miss Garrison, a daughter 
of Jacob Garrison, of Dividing Creek. Mr. 
Garrison, who was of German extraction, fol- 
lowed the calling of a sailor, and served his 
country in the War of 1S12. After his mar- 
riage Captain Amos Pepper settled on a small 
farm near Dividing Creek, which thereafter 
remained his permanent abode. Of his seven 
children six grew up, namely: Mary, the wife 
of Daniel Gaskell, of Port Norris; William 
B., the subject of this sketch; Phcebe, who 
married John Tullis, of Dividing Creek; 
Amos, now captain of a boat, and a resident of 
Port Norris; Jacob, a resident of Dividing 
Creek; and Charles, residing in Port Norris. 
The father and mother were life members of 
the old Baptist Church of Dividing Creek, the 
father having been a Deacon. He died July 
2, 1 88 1, at the age of seventy-two years. 
The mother, now seventy-eight years of age, 
still lives on the old farm. 

Captain William B. Pepper attended school 
in Drakestown, Morris County, until he was 
ten years of age. He then went to sea with 
his father, and thereafter was engaged in 
seafaring for twelve years. Afterward he had 
charge of an oyster boat. In 1862 he enlisted 
in the Twenty-fourth New Jersey Volunteer 
Infantry, and was sent to the Army of the 
Potomac, going out as private. His initiation 
in war was received at the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg, where his company lost ten by 
death, many others being wounded. He had 
been previously promoted to Second Lieuten- 
ant, and after the siege of Fredericksburg he 
was made Captain, serving in that capacity at 



Chancellorsville. He was honorably dis- 
charged July 3, 1863, at Beverly, N.J., and 
returned to his home in Dividing Creek, after- 
ward commanding an oyster boat until 1876. 
He plants and gathers oysters, and sells them 
by wholesale to customers in this State, New 
York, and Pennsylvania. Captain Pepper has 
an interest in three boats. He is one of the 
oldest men in this business, and is also one of 
the largest shippers of oysters. For four 
years he was a Director of the Oyster Asso- 
ciation, of which he is one of the founders. 
The object of the organization is the protec- 
tion of oysters in the bay from the oyster pi- 
rates. He was also instrumental in having 
the railroad built. He is a member of New- 
port Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and of the 
J. C. Shinn Post of Port Norris, and attends 
the national Grand Army of the Republic 
encampments. 

On August 4, i860, he was married to 
Emeline Studhams, a daughter of Daniel 
Studhams, who was a seaman of this town- 
ship. Captain and Mrs. Pepper have six chil- 
dren — Almeda, the wife of Sanford Bacon, of 
this township, and the mother of two children 
— Lilian and Alma; Frank K., an oysterman, 
of Port Norris, who married Miss Elizabeth 
Harris, and has two children — William B. 
and Alice; Ella, who married William Hut- 
tenloch, of Dividing Creek, and has three chil- 
dren — Morton, Ralph, and George; Lilian, 
who is the wife of Warren Marts, of Dividing 
Creek; Anna, who married Clarence Robbins, 
and has one child, Hellen; and Alberta, who 
lives at home. The parents have been for 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



thirty years members of the Baptist church, of 
which Captain Pepper has been Treasurer and 
Trustee. 

LENHART RICE, of Bridgeton, N.J., 
a partner of the Acme Gas Fixture 
Company and of Frazeur & Rice, both 
well-known firms in the city, is one of the 
most successful business men in the State. 
He was born in Bridgeton, August 29, 1841, 
son of William and Nancy Snelling (Jacobs) 
Rice. His grandfather, Philip Rice, who was 
a native of Sweden, emigrated to this country, 
and settled in Dorchester, N.J., where he 
kept a hotel for a considerable time. 

William Rice, from whom the son undoubt- 
edly inherited his business aptitude, was also 
a successful man. His birth occurred March 
15, 1796, in Dorchester, where also he re- 
ceived a common-school education. His 
school days ended, he engaged in the calling 
of a sailor, and is alleged to have commanded 
a vessel at the age of sixteen years. Having 
spent eight years in seafaring life, he estab- 
lished himself in liridgeton and Millville as a 
ship-builder, taking up his residence in the 
former place. He carried on his business for 
thirty-five years, during which period he built 
many large vessels, and made a fortune. He 
then retired from active occui^ation, anil died 
June 29, I 87 I, at the age of seventy-five years. 
A company of infantry, in which he had en- 
listed, was called out during the War of 18 12. 
One of several expressions of public esteem 
for him was his election to the office of Free- 
holder of Bridgeton. Both he and his family 



were members of the Trinity Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, of which he was one of the 
founders. He was also an active worker in 
the organization called the Sons of Temper- 
ance. His wife was a daughter of Charles 
Jacobs, of Boston, Mass. Death having ren- 
dered her fatherless at the age of nine years, 
she was brought up in Dorchester, N.J., by a 
family whose members belonged to the benev- 
olent Society of Friends. She bore her hus- 
band ten children, namely; Charles J., 
Thomas, Philip, Harriet, William, Elizabeth, 
Anna J., Roger, Matilda, and J. Lenhart. 
Harriet became the wife of li. P. Wilson; 
Elizabeth, the wife of Enoch Brooks; Anna 
J., the wife of Wallace C. Rodgers; Matilda, 
the wife of Joseph M. Elwell and subse- 
quently of John M. Frazeur. William re- 
sides in Bridgeton. 

J. Lenhart Rice was educated in the public 
schools of Bridgeton. On leaving school he 
was trained in the ship-carpenter's trade by 
his father. When twenty-one years old he 
enlisted in Compan)' II, Twenty-fourth Regi- 
ment, New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, for ser- 
vice in the Civil War. He went to the front 
with his regiment, which joined the Army of 
the Potomac, took part in the battles of Fred- 
ericksburg and Chancellorsville, and was hon- 
orably discharged in 1862. The next year 
he established himself in business. In 1877, 
in company with David O. Frazeur, he pur- 
chased the lime business of John B. Rogers. 
This they have successfully carried on since, 
under the firm name of I'razeur & Rice. 
To-day they have the largest trade of the kind 




> \ 



J. LENHART RICE. 



lUOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



329 



in Southern Jersey. In 1894 he sold out to 
his brother the business started by him in 
1863, and, together with his son, formed the 
Acme Gas Fixture Company. Owing to good 
management this firm has been most prosper- 
ous, and is now doing a business that gives 
regular employment to over forty men. 

On September 13, 1865, Mr. Rice was 
united in matrimony with Maria A., daughter 
of Samuel D. Frazeur. Of this marriage 
there were born three children, of whom one 
is deceased. Those living are: Wallace C. 
and Jessie A. Both parents are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. During Mr. 
Rice's connection with the society, a period 
of forty-two years, he has served in all the 
offices, from the lowest capacity to that of 
local preacher. 

Mr. Rice, who has always taken an active 
interest in local affairs, was Town Clerk of 
Bridgeton for a number of years before it was 
chartered as a city. In 1S91 he was elected 
to the Common Council by Ward 3, on the 
Republican ticket, and served in that body 
until 1894. At one time he was a member of 
the Sons of Temperance. He has affiliation 
with Brearly Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Bridge- 
ton ; with Cumberland Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of Bridgeton; and with 
the A. L. Robeson Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic. The family occupy the tasteful 
residence, 162 Broad Street, built by Mr. 
Rice in 1871. He settled in Bridgeton in 
1865; and his record as a citizen, a man of 
business, and a Christian has been such as to 
win the respect of all his neighbors. 



^OHN ALFRED ACKLEY, auctioneer 
and Justice of the Peace in Vineland, 
was born in Absecon, Atlantic County, 
July 14, 1854, son of William and Mary R. 
(Smallwood) Ackley. His grandfather, Uriah 
Ackley, whose birth occurred at Blackwater, 
June 5, 1780, was a farmer and a sawyer. 
Grandfather Ackley also found time to serve 
as itinerant preacher of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. In 1809 he married Sarah 
Coombs, who was born April 25, 1791. She 
had by him fourteen children, as follows: 
Samuel, born February 5, 18 10, who died 
February 28, 1890; William, born November 
I, 181 1 ; Joseph, born July 23, 18 13, who 
died October iS, 1892; Rachel, born March 
17, 181 5, who died October 22, 1880; Han- 
nah, born November 11, 18 16, who died Octo- 
ber 6, 1893; Ann, born May 11, 18 18; Mary, 
born September 23, 18 19; John, born March 
24, 1822; Jesse C, born October 20, 1823; 
Sarah Ann, born May 2, 1826, who died Feb- 
ruary 10, 1896; Coombs, born January [7, 
1828; Ruth, born September 5, 1829; Jane, 
born June 1 1, 1832, who died March 14, 1876; 
and George, born July 15, 1835. The father 
died August 5, 1854, and the mother, August 
4, 1879. 

William Ackley, who was a native of Union 
Mill, this county, beginning as soon as he 
was able, worked as a farm hand for his father 
and the neighbors until he came of age. 
After his marriage he took up his residence in 
Elmer, Salem County, where he purchased a 
tract of land and a saw-mill. In clearing the 
land, which was thickly wooded, he manu- 



33° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



factured such trees as were suitable for the 
purpose into ship timbers. Of other trees he 
made cord wood, while such as were not suit- 
able for either of these purposes he converted 
into charcoal. There being no railroad com- 
munication then, he had the ship timbers 
carted by mule teams to Bridgeton, where he 
disposed of them at a satisfactory price, for 
use in the building of coasting-vessels, a 
thriving industry of the place at that time. 
For the other products he found a ready 
market in Philadelphia, sending the wood by 
way of Bridgeton on coasting-vessels and the 
charcoal direct on mule wagons. Then, as 
fast as the land was cleared, he put it under 
cultivation. He also kept a general store for 
the convenience of the large number of men 
he had employed. After a residence of five or 
si.x years in Elmer he moved to Absecon, 
where he obtained and successfully filled two 
profitable contracts for grading sections of the 
road-bed of the original Camden & Atlantic 
Railroad. He subsequently undertook and 
carried out a contract to grade roads in the 
neighborhood of Atlantic City, which then 
existed only on paper. In the performance of 
this work he was the first to land a mule team 
on the island. He is also entitled to the dis- 
tinction of having graded the first lots and 
streets laid out within the city territory. In 
1857 he left Absecon for the old Ackley 
homestead, situated on the west bank of the 
Maurice River, about a mile and a half south 
of Land is Avenue. He spent one season 
there, and then went to Deal Town, now 
Duffield's Mill, where he became manager of a 



farm owned by Potter & Bodine, glass manu- 
facturers of Bridgeton. He was employed 
here until i860, when he went to Bridgeton 
and engaged in teaming. He carried on this 
business until the Civil War broke out, when 
he enlisted in Captain James R. Hoagland's 
company of the Twenty-fourth New Jersey 
Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was sent 
to re-enforce the Army of the Potomac, and he 
participated in the battles of Fredericksburg 
and Chancellorsville. After receiving his 
honorable discharge in 1863, he returned to 
Bridgeton for a short stay, and then came to 
Vineland. At first he accepted an engage- 
ment from Wilson Brothers to oversee the cut- 
ting of their lumber and the hauling of it to 
the railroad. Afterward he bought a farm, 
which be has since conducted with his usual 
success. His marriage with his wife took 
place in 1832. She was a daughter of Solo- 
mon Smallwood, of May's Landing. They 
had seven children, six of whom are still liv- 
ing; namely, Caroline E., Rachel, William 
S., Charles F., Elizabeth J., and John A. 
Caroline E. married James N. Bedloe, of 
Philadelphia, and died in 1894; Rachel is the 
wife of Joseph T. Dailey, of Bridgeton; and 
Elizabeth J. is the wife of Gilbert G. Rich- 
man, of Pleasantville, Landis township; 
William S. was killed April 2, 1865, in front 
of Petersburg, Va., while leading a charge 
of Company K, Fourth New Jersey Infantry 
Volunteer, of which he was Captain. The 
father attends the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which the mother is a member. 

John Alfretl Ackley, after receiving his ed- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33^ 



ucation partly in the Bank Street School at 
Bridgeton and partly in the public school of 
Vineland, worked for a while respectively in 
the cotton-mill at Millville and in the glass 
factory of VVhitall, Tatum & Co. From 1870 
to 1 88 1 he was employed in hotel business in 
Philadelphia, being obliged by it to spend 
the summer season at Atlantic City. Then he 
came to Vineland, bought a farm, and con- 
ducted it for two years. He next entered the 
employment of Charles Keighley, shoe manu- 
facturer, with whom he remained until 1884, 
when he embarked in the business of auction- 
eer with Charles H. Birkinshaw, under the 
firm name of Ackley & Birkinshaw. Dealing 
in new and second-hand furniture, they did a 
large business for about four years. Then 
Mr. Ackley sold his interest to C. H. Moraii. 
Subsequently he bought out the second-hand 
goods and auction business, and has since car- 
ried on both with remarkable success. It was 
Mr. Ackley who conducted and cried the 
largest real estate sales in South Jersey. 

On July 7, 1885, he married Antha V., 
daughter of William J. Smith, of Vineland. 
The union has been blessed by the birth of 
four children — Mary L., Charles W., John 
Alfred, Jr., and Rocus W. The last two were 
twins, of whom Rocus W. is deceased. Both 
parents are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Mr. Ackley is a Free Mason, 
owing allegiance to the Vineland Lodge, of 
which he is Junior Warden. He has also 
affiliation with the Sons of Veterans, Camp 
Lieutenant Porter, and with Vineland Castle, 
No. 46, Knights of Golden Eagle. Enter- 



prising and persistent, Mr. Ackley is a type 
of Vincland's prosperous business men. 




fAVlLLIAM HOLLINGSHEAD 
TOWNSEND, a prominent citizen 
of Dividing Creek, Cumberland County, N.J., 
who is successfully engaged in the oyster- 
shipping business at Bivalve, was born on 
September 25, 1842, at a place between Di- 
viding Creek and Port Norris, being a son of 
Mark and Rachel (Garrison) Townsend. 

His great-grandfather, Mark Townsend, the 
first of the name, an English emigrant, was 
one of the early settlers in Cape May County, 
New Jersey. He is said to have been accom- 
panied to America by two brothers. His son, 
Mark, second, whose birth occurred about 
1788, followed the ancient and honorable 
occupation of husbandry in Cape May County 
throughout life. He served his country in 
the second war with England, being stationed 
on Cape May. He and his wife were both 
identified in religious faith and activity with 
the Society of Friends, he being at one time 
the clerk of the meeting. He was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah Bradway, and of 
this union were born six children, only two of 
whom attained to maturity, namely: Aaron, 
who is now deceased; and Mark, third. The 
father passed away about 1850, at the age of 
sixty-two years. 

Mark Townsend, third, son of Mark, second, 
was born on the first day of January, 18 16, 
at what is now known as Seaville, in Cape 
May County, and was educated in the common 



332 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



schools of his native town. When he was 
quite young he removed with his parents to 
Alloway's Creek, as it was then called; and 
after living there a few years his residence 
was again changed to the neighborhood of Di- 
viding Creek. At the termination of his 
period of schooling, and when still only a lad, 
he commenced to follow the water, being em- 
ployed on what was termed a wood shallop, 
which was engaged in transporting wood be- 
tween points on the Maurice River and the 
city of Philadelphia. His skilful seamanship 
is evidenced in the fact that when he was only 
about eighteen years of age he was given the 
command of a vessel. In 1854 or there- 
abouts he engaged in the oyster business, 
being the owner of the craft which he sailed. 
He continued in that industry between eight 
and ten years, when he sold the boat, and pur- 
chased a farm of about twelve acres, on which 
he raised garden vegetables, specializing in 
corn and sweet potatoes. Since 1894 he has 
lived retired from the active cares of business, 
though he enjoys excellent health for a man of 
over fourscore years of age. 

He was married in 1838 to Miss Rachel 
Garrison, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Garrison, of Down township, and he became 
the father of five children, as follows: Ruth, 
who died when a girl of si.x summers; Josiah, 
who passed away in infancy; William Hol- 
lingshead; Sarah, who is now the wife of 
Frank Stults, an inhabitant of Philadelphia; 
and Mark, fourth, who resides at Port Norris. 
Mr. Mark Townsend is a member of Welcome 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 



at Cedarville. He was early called upon to 
mourn the death of his wife, who passed away 
from earth in August, 1850. Mrs. Rachel 
Townsend was a member of the Baptist Church 
of Dividing Creek. 

William Hollingshead Townsend received 
a common-school education at Dividing Creek. 
At the early age of twelve years he entered 
upon his seafaring life, attending school one 
quarter in the winter, and following the water 
the remainder of the year. Becoming thus ac- 
customed to the ways of the sea, he when 
only eighteen was appointed captain of a ves- 
sel, in which capacity he continued actively 
employed until about 1878. Since that time 
he has conducted an oyster-shipping business, 
having been at first in company with John C. 
Hand, under the firm style of Hand & Town- 
send. The partnership being dissolved in 
1893, Mr. Townsend has since conducted the 
industry alone at Bivalve, marketing as a com- 
mission merchant during the summer the prod- 
ucts of the fishing-ships. 

On December 13, 1862, he was joined in 
marriage with Miss Catherine Ann Turner, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Turner, of 
Dividing Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Townsend 
have two children, namely: Rachel, who is 
now the wife of George W. Robbins, of Fort 
Lee, Bergen County, N.J. ; and Annie C, 
who resides at Cape May as the wife of W. H. 
Robbins. 

Mr. Townsend has been repeatedly elected 
by his fellow-citizens to positions of public 
trust, and he has responded by serving them 
in several important capacities. For two 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



333 



years he acted as Inspector of Elections, dur- 
ing five years he constituted one member of 
the Township Committee, in 1888 he was 
elected Freeholder for a term of two years, 
and ill 1894 he was again elected to tliat 
office. He has represented his town as a 
delegate to the county convention, and he has 
also officiated in the responsible position of 
Trustee of the Public Schools. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church of Dividing Creek, 
of which he has been a clerk and a Trustee. 
Mrs. Townsend is also identified with that 
church. 



^-f^\j^^ORTIMER MAYHEW is a well- 
t— I — f known producer of garden vege- 
^ V_^ tables and small fruits at Buck- 

shuteni, in Commercial township, N.J., where 
he was born on June i, 1856. He is a son of 
John Lore and Catherine P. (Bright) Mayhew, 
and is a representative of an old and respected 
Cumberland County family of English extrac- 
tion. His great-great-grandfather, Thomas 
Mayhew, emigrated from England and settled 
at Deerfield, N.J., more than one hundred 
years ago. 

Uriah Mayhew, son of Thomas, became the 
father of Ezekiel Mayhew, who was born in 
Deerfield, N.J., about 1781, and who engaged 
there in general farming throughout his life. 
In 1S03 he was united in matrimony with Miss 
Hannah Lore, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Lore. Si.x children were born to them, 
three of whom attained to maturity, namely : 
John Lore, who in September of the present 
year, 1S96, reached the venerable age of 



ninety years; Ezekiel, Jr. ; and Lydia. Eze- 
kiel Mayhew was a regular attendant at the 
Baptist Church in Deerfield, for the support 
of the services of which he liberally contri- 
buted. 

His son, John Lore Mayhew, the father of 
the subject of this sketch, was born in Buck- 
shutem on September 6, 1806. He enjoyed 
such educational advantages as the common 
schools of his native town afforded at the time 
of his youth, and for several years after the 
completion of his course of study he engaged 
in school teaching. He then purchased a 
farm, which at that time comprised about 
forty-four acres. This he has augmented at 
various times until the estate, which his son 
Mortimer now conducts, embraces about fifty- 
eight acres. Here, until 1886, when he retired 
from active life, he prosecuted the honored 
vocation of husbandry, raising as principal 
crops sweet potatoes, of which he produced 
yearly between two hundred and four hundred 
barrels, watermelons, of which he raised from 
two thousand to six thousand a year, and can- 
taloupes, which he cultivated to the extent of 
between one hundred and two hundred and 
fifty barrels each year. He likewise kept 
from ten to fifteen head of cattle, and made 
butter, which he sold to private customers. 
Besides this property he was the possessor of 
several other farms. 

On F'ebruary 26, 1 830, Mr. John Lore May- 
hew wedded Miss Catherine P. Bright, a daugh- 
ter of Levi Bright. Her father was a native 
of Dividing Creek, where he spent his life in 
agricultural pursuits. He and his wife, Mrs. 



334 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Sarah (Glen) Bright, whose grandfather was 
Gabriel Glen, of England, were the parents of 
four children, namely: William; Anna, who 
was married to Uriah Mayhew; Catherine P., 
who was born November 27, 1809, and is now 
Mrs. John L. Mayhew; and Levi, Jr. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bright both passed away when Mrs. 
Mayhew was only three years of age. Their 
religious faith and sympathies brought them 
into affiliation with the Baptist Church of Di- 
viding Creek, which they regularly supported 
with their presence and substance. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John L. Mayhew were 
born nine children, seven of whom grew to 
maturity, namely: the late Alfred W., who 
resided in Millville; Lorenzo, an inhabitant 
of Richmond, Ind. ; Hannah Lore; Martha 
\V., who is now the wife of Stetson L. Bacon, 
a practising physician of I'ort Norris, N.J, ; 
Francis; John L., Jr.; and Mortimer. Mr. 
Mayhew, the father, is well known; and he 
has enjoyed the respect and confidence of his 
fellow-citizens a great many years. He has 
been elected to various public offices, and has 
served for several years as Township Assessor, 
and, previously to the division of the town, 
also as Collector for over a decade. He has 
likewise officiated as a member of the Town- 
ship Committee. Mr. Mayhew still remem- 
bers seeing, when a lad at home, the soldiers 
going down to the coast to defend Cape May 
during the second war with luigland, and their 
stopping at his father's house, and being en- 
tertained with bread and butter, boiled eggs, 
and the like. His life, which opened at very 
nearly the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 



tury, has extended almost throughout its entire 
length ; and it is hoped that he may be spared 
to witness the ushering in of the more glori- 
ous twentieth century. 

Mortimer Mayhew received his early intel- 
lectual training in the common schools of 
Buckshutem, and he also spent two years at a 
select school in Mauricetown. I-fe studied 
music at home under a private instructor, and 
also for one winter at Philadelphia. After 
his departure from academic halls he gave in- 
struction during two or three winters on the 
pianoforte and organ, i^T the summer months 
engaging in the work of the farm. He has 
always made his home on the paternal farm, 
and on his father's retirement in 1886 he as- 
sumed its management. He is now occupied 
with the cultivation of garden vegetables and 
fruits, devoting about four acres of land to the 
growth of strawberries, five to watermelons, 
three to cantaloupes, and from five to eight 
acres to sweet potatoes. 

On August 15, i8gi, he joined in wedlock 
with Miss Lura Del. Laighton, a daughter of 
the Rev. John B. Laighton, a Baptist minister 
of New Hampshire. 

Mr. Mayhew has responded to the invitation 
of his fellow-citizens to occupy official posi- 
tions, and he has served them with acceptabil- 
ity as a Trustee of the Public Schools for 
twelve years. He also officiated as a member 
of the Board of Registration and Election for 
about five years, and before the new law went 
into effect he filled the same position for about 
a half a dozen years. In national politics he 
affiliates with the Democratic party, the prin- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



33S 



ciplcs and candidates of which he earnestly 
and vigorously supports. He is a regular 
attendant at and a liberal contributor to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Buckshutem, 
of which his wife is the organist. Mrs. 
Mayhew is a Baptist in persuasion, but there 
is no church of that denomination located in 
or near Buckshutem. 




REEMAN S. HALE, a retired busi- 
ness man of Vineland, N.J., was born 
in Winchcndon, Mass., October i6, 1823. 
His parents, Jacob and Betsey (Brown) Hale, 
were both natives of that town, where his 
father was engaged in farming. He died 
when Freeman S., his youngest child, was 
about twenty years of age. Mrs. Betsey Hale, 
who was a daughter of Amos Brown, of VVin- 
chendon, lived through twenty years of widow- 
hood, and reared twelve children to maturity. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hale were members of the 
Baptist church. 

Freeman S. Hale attended the district 
school near his home, and worked on the farm 
until he attained his majority. He then 
learned to make pails, and worked at his trade 
some years, becoming foreman of his depart- 
ment. He subsequently removed to Concord, 
Vt. , and thence to Templeton. During the 
panic of 1857 he went to San Francisco by 
way of the Isthmus of Panama, arriving there 
about the time of the Frazer River (British 
Columbia) mining e.vcitement. One of the 
first to reach the scene of operations, he staked 
out a claim, and engaged immediately in sur- 



face mining, to which he devoted one summer. 
He had a partner; and the two built the first 
log cabin in the locality, the only dwellings 
there previous to that time being Indian wig- 
wams. There were many Indians in the coun- 
try, and the partners had to take turns in 
guarding their property and provisions, wliich 
were liable to be stolen. Their claim was 
high in the mountains, where there are heavy 
floods in August. When Mr. Hale and his 
partner located there, Indians and squaws 
worked witli them side by side; but the sav- 
ages were driven out by the first flood, and in 
the mean time the white settlers increased in 
numbers to such an extent that the Indians 
did not think it best to return. 

The miners, however, were still obliged to 
guard their [jroperty closely, for the V'igilance 
Committee drove "Ned McGowan's crowd" 
from San Francisco, and they located in the 
part of the country where Mr. Hale had set- 
tled; and every man was constantly on the 
alert and ready to defend himself from these 
desperadoes. At the time of high water, 
when Mr. Hale was obliged to suspend his 
mining operations, he, in company with two 
other men, started a pit-saw, and succeeded in 
turning out from one hundred and fifty to two 
hundred feet of lumber a day; and, as lumber 
there was worth four hundred dollars per one 
thousand feet, they made well on it. Before 
leaving his claim he had two partners, who 
did the manual labor while he attended to the 
trading. They bought tlie claims of many 
who wanted to sell, and sold thein to otliers, 
sometimes making double profit. Large sums 



336 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of money were constantly changing hands in 
those days, and the necessities of life were 
rated at an exorbitant price. Mr. Hale at one 
time paid seventy-five cents for a pound of 
nails. He spent the winter in San Francisco, 
and was so fortunate as to find work there at 
his trade — fortunate, for at that time not one 
in fifty could obtain employment. 

He started for home by way of the Isthmus 
of Tehuantepec, taking the steamer to San 
Diego, where the party found forty or fifty new 
Concord stage-coaches, to vvliich were harnessed 
mules or raw ponies, four or six to each coach. 
At the beginning of the journey the pas- 
sengers were often required to get out; but 
after they were fairly started they could ride 
most of the way, though many of the ponies 
died on the route. The terminus of the stage 
route was a Mexican corral, where saddled 
ponies and mules awaited the passengers, the 
road beyond being impassable for wheels. 
Mr. Hale selected a mule, and proceeded on 
liis journey. The party, which was the first 
to go over this route, consisted of three hun- 
dred ICastern men returning home. Reaching 
the Minatitlan River, they took passage on a 
little steamer which drew about eighteen 
inches of water. This boat took them to deep 
water, where they embarked on a regular pas- 
senger steamer for New Orleans, and thence 
took a slow boat to Louisville, Ky., the jour- 
ney between New Orleans and Louisville 
covering fourteen days. The journey, how- 
ever, was not a tedious one; for the men be- 
guiled the hours in various ways, and the pre- 
vailing feeling of good comradeship helped to 



speed the time. At Cincinnati Mr. Hale 
bought a suit of store clothes, which he needed 
badly, and a white shirt, so that when he 
boarded the train for Tempi eton the "wild 
Westerner" was transformed into a sedate 
Eastern man. 

He had some money saved, and, after work- 
ing for a time in a chair factor}' at Templeton, 
he started again for the West, locating on a 
farm of three hundred and fifty acres in Man- 
hattan, Kan. There he engaged in cattle and 
sheep raising; but he labored under as great 
difificulties as he did in California, for it was 
the time of border ruffianism and jayhawking, 
when no man's life or property was safe. . 
Numbers of cattle and horses were stolen in 
Missouri and sent to Manhattan to be sold; 
and the cattle thieves carried things with a 
high hand, defying law and oriler. Even if 
caught and imprisoned, they were rescued by 
their friends. A committee of fourteen was 
finally formed, of which Mr. Hale was a mem- 
ber, who went to the rendezvous of the des- 
peradoes, determined to arrest them. The 
man who met the committee fired at them, and 
was shot dead; and after some difficulty the 
rest of the gang were captured and delivered 
to the military, who took them to Fort Riley 
and Fort Leavenworth. They escaped once 
more, and were terrorizing the neighborhood, 
when the coimtry rose in arms, and lynchetl 
some of them, and drove the rest from the 
State. Mr. Hale, as a member of the Vigi- 
lance Committee, was often compelled to ride 
all night. That winter, with two others, he 
went to Missouri to buy sheep; and the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



337 



people were so suspicious that he was closely 
examined, and finally given a pass which 
stated, "This man has been examined by the 
committee and found all right." This pass 
saved his life; but he was followed by a num- 
ber of men with guns, and told that he had 
better get out or he would be shot for being a 
Yankee. He stayed in Kansas two years, and 
then, weakened by malaria, returned home, 
where he remained a year. After that he 
spent another year in Kansas, but finally de- 
cided to come back East, leasing his sheep 
farm. He was in Kansas during the famine 
year of i860, and was preparing to leave just 
as Price was making his last raid. All the 
men of Kansas between the ages of sixteen 
and forty-five were called out, and assembled 
at Manhattan and Kansas City. Mr. Hale 
got out his old gun and blankets, and was 
twenty-two days in military service, but was 
not called upon to fight. The year he was at 
home he was in the livery business in Fitch- 
burg, Mass. ; and while there he volunteered 
for the army, but could not pass the physical 
examination. 

After his second return from Kansas he 
visited for a short time in Massachusetts; and 
in 1865 he purchased a place at the corner of 
Eighth and Elmer Streets, Vineland, N.J. 
This land was at that time covered with brush, 
and Mr. Hale witii characteristic energy 
cleared it and improved it. He was in the 
lumber business for a year or two when there 
was a great demand for lumber in Vineland, 
then manufactured Shaker hoods for a year, 
and about 1868 engaged in the grocery busi- 



ness with S. D. Dyer, under the firm name of 
Dyer & Hale. The firm managed a successful 
business for fourteen years, and built two fine 
brick blocks on Landis Avenue, the principal 
street of the city, one three- story and one two- 
story building. They also own considerable 
other real estate. 

About 1S82 Mr. Hale retired from trade, 
and he has since then given his attention to 
his real estate interests. While working for 
his own prosperity, Mr. Hale has always been 
ready to help projects for the general good of 
the public. He has taken a great interest in 
the Vineland Agricultural Society, was Presi- 
dent of the Vineland Fair Association many 
years, and one of the most active in establish- 
ing their track. He was instrumental in get- 
ting the fire apparatus for \'ineland, collecting 
the money to buy the first engine, and was 
President of the first company. He has been 
one of the Directors of the Siloam Cemetery 
Association for many years, and has had 
charge of all the work in the cemetery, which 
yearly grows more beautiful. He was a mem- 
ber of the Beaver Lake Association, which 
started a beautiful park, but were obliged to 
give it up because it was outside of police 
regulations. 

Mr. Hale has been twice married. His 
first wife, Maria Sibley, of Winchcndon, 
Mass., died in 1S57, leaving one child, Elvira 
M., who is the widow of John F. Doughty, of 
Vineland. Mrs. Doughty has one child, 
Hattie, who resides with her grandfather 
Hale. She is quite an accomplished young 
lad)', having graduated from the Emerson 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



School of Oratory in Boston. January i, 
1866, Mr. Hale was married to Mrs. Eliza 
Kimball Hale, of Wallingford, Vt., daughter 
of Charles A. Kimball, one of the old and re- 
spected residents of the town. She still pre- 
sides over the beautiful home at the corner of 
Eighth and Elmer Streets where her husband 
has lived for thirty years. 

In politics Mr. Hale was a Democrat in his 
younger days, but for many years now has 
been an ardent Prohibitionist. He has served 
on the City Council, and has taken an active 
[jart in all reform movements, working espe- 
cially for the cause of temperance; and he 
has lived up to his principles, for he is one of 
the few men who went to California in the 
early days of that State, and remained unsul- 
lied by the common vice of intemperance. 
His wife is a member of the Baptist church, 
which he attends and helps to support. He 
carefully treasures the Bible that his sister 
gave him before he went West, which was 
there often borrowed to administer oaths 
upon. 



OHN CHEW APPLEGATE, M.D., an 
esteemed physician of Bridgeton, N.J., 
was born near Hurffville, Gloucester 
County, this State, on Eebruary 19, 1861, 
son of Joseph and Drusilla (Iiatten) Applegatc. 
His grandfather, Anthony Applegatc, whose 
parents were among the settlers in the vicinity 
of Norris River, N.J., located at Hurffville in 
early life, and there remained until his death, 
having been engaged as a shoe dealer during 
the years of his business activity. 



Joseph Applegatc, a native of Hurffville, 
son of Anthony, was born on February 6, 1831. 
His education was such as the district schools 
afforded. Beginning the work of life betimes, 
he carried on farming operations on an exten- 
sive scale until 1881, when he removed to 
Camden, N.J., and engaged in business, in 
which he continued for fourteen years. At 
the end of that period he sold the business, 
and removed to Pitman Grove, where he has 
since lived in retirement. His wife was a 
daughter of Jacob and Rebecca Batten. 

Dr. Applegatc was one of eight children, 
seven of whom attained maturity, William S., 
the eldest, having chosen the same profession 
as his brother, that of medicine. 

John Chew Applegatc, after receiving his 
elementary education in the public schools of 
Lincoln and Harrisonville, pursued an ad- 
vanced course at the Friends' Select School 
at Woodstown, under the direction of Professor 
Norris. While studying here he obtained a 
teacher's certificate, and thereafter engaged in 
teaching until the spring of 1884. He was 
fulfilling an engagement at Harmony School, 
Mullica Hill, Gloucester County, when he 
began to read medicine with Dr. E. E. Dc 
Gofft. In the fall of 1S84 he entered Jeffer- 
son Medical College at Philadelphia. Hav- 
ing successfully completed a three years' 
course, he graduated in the class of 1887. In 
the same period he was able to take a special 
course in the Lying-in Charity Hospital, and 
also in the Hospital for Diseases of the Skin, 
securing a certificate from each. On obtaining 
his tiiploma he went to Fairton, where he sue- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



339 



ceeded to the practice of his brother, Dr. 
William S. Applegate, who removed to Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. In Fairton he spent three years, 
considerably increasing the jiractice with 
which he began. Then he came to Bridgeton, 
where he now has an extensive professional 
connection, his office being located on East 
Commerce Street, in the original Fithian 
Building, part of which he purchased in 1891. 
His residence is at 56 Fayette Street. 

On June 6, 1888, Dr. Applegate married 
Frances, daughter of Zamor and Rachel 
Briggs, of Cape Vincent, N.Y. They have 
one child, Zamor B. Both parents are mem- 
bers of St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, the 
father at one time having been Junior Warden, 
and being at the present time a member of the 
Vestry. He is also a member and an ex-Presi- 
dent of the Cumberland County Medical Soci- 
ety, which he has several times represented as a 
delegate to the State Medical Society. He is 
a member of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, also of the State Medical Society of New 
Jersey, and of the American Dermatological 
Association. He is a life-member of the 
Alumni Association of Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, and was the first President of the Crystal 
Literary Society of Mullica Hill. Prior to 
his medical career, as a journalist he contrib- 
uted to the columns of the press, including 
regular correspondence to the Woodstown 
Monitor. He is a regular correspondent of 
the Codex Medicus of Philadelphia, and has 
contributed to the Philadelphia Medical 
lUillctiii. He is affiliated with Welcome 
Council, No. 45, of the Junior Order of 



United American Mechanics, and formerly 
had connection with a lodge of Good Tem- 
plars, during which he passed through all the 
chairs. 

Dr. Applegate was not long in Bridgeton 
before his skill as a physician became known. 
Since then he has rapidly grown in the confi- 
dence of the people, so that now he possesses 
an enviable reputation. He is examiner for a 
number of life insurance companies, including 
the Prudential (ordinary branch), the North- 
western Mutual Life and ICndowment Insur- 
ance Company of Milwaukee, the Manhattan 
Life Insurance Company, and the Fidelity 
Mutual Life Association of Philadelphia. A 
man of Dr. Applegate's ability reflects credit 
on the town of his residence. 




Y^ll'ARRISON WILSON, an actor well 
known in various sections of the 
country, is now living in retire- 
ment in Vineland. He was born in Philadel- 
phia, June 4, 1835, son of James Sampson 
and Jane (Lemon) Wilson. His grandfather, 
James Sampson Wilson, Sr., was a native of 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

James .S. Wilson, Jr., was a native of Phil- 
adelphia, born on New Year's Day of 1800. 
He received a practical common-school educa- 
tion, after which he learned the trade of an 
edge-tool maker, and was employed as a jour- 
neyman in his native city up to 1837. That 
year he removed to Pittsburg, Pa., and entered 
the employ of Li])pincott & Co., edge-tool 
manufacturers, with whom he remained for 



340 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



several years. About 1850 he purchased a 
farm in what is now Montrose, Allegheny 
County, Pa. Here he worked at farming, and 
carried on a blacksmith shop until the out- 
break of the Civil War. He then enlisted in 
Company B, One Hundred and Si.xty-third 
Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, 
and was made Quartermaster of his company. 
In the spring of 1863 he was honorably dis- 
charged, after which he did not actively en- 
gage in any business. His death occurred on 
December 28, 1884. He was a prominent 
man in Montrose, and in turn served in nearly 
all the different offices within the gift of the 
town. He was a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. His wife, Jane, a daughter of 
James Lemon, became the mother of the fol- 
lowing children: William Thompson, Harri- 
son, Rebecca Jane, Mary, Clarissa, Margaret, 
Rachel Adeline, and James S. Rebecca Jane, 
deceased, was the wife of John Henderson, of 
Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, near Spring- 
dale; Mary is now Mrs. Jacob Beck, of IMtts- 
burg. Pa. ; Clarissa married Henry A. 
Vought, of Pittsburg; Margaret is the wife of 
Matthew Bourland, also of Pittsburg; Rachel 
Adeline is now deceased; and James S. lives 
near Springdale. The parents were members 
of the United Presbyterian cluirch. 

Harrison Wilson received his education in 
the district schools of Fairview and at Father 
Riley's Academy in Wilmington, Del. After 
completing in 1852 a three years' course at the 
academy, he remained at home for a short 
time. He then secured employment as a clerk 
in Pittsburg, and subsequently held a similar 



position on a river steamboat. His career as 
an actor began while he was employed in this 
last capacity. In the winter following his 
twenty-second birtjiday the steamer on which 
he worked was lying at Cleveland, Ohio. An 
amateur dramatic association of that city had 
planned to present a play called the "Idiot 
Witness," and had secured William R. 
Goodall, a well-known actor of that day, for 
the leading part. Some one was needed to 
play the part of Walter Arlington, and after 
considerable urging Mr. Wilson was prevailed 
upon to take it. He subsequently acquitted 
himself so well that Mr. Goodall became in- 
terested in him, and advised him to make a 
study of the actor's profession. Through this 
friend's influence Mr. Wilson secured a posi- 
tion in one of the city theatres, playing minor 
parts for two years. The third year he was 
regularly engaged for the role of "walking 
gentleman," and played in many of the prin- 
cipal theatres throughout the country. He 
was at one time the leading JLivenile and light 
comedy actor of St. Louis, and played such 
parts as those of Horatio and Laertes with a 
number of stars, including Forrest and Kean. 
In the spring of 1 870 he accepted an offer from 
George Wood to play character parts in the 
New York City Museum, where he remained 
for three years, having the privilege of spend- 
ing the summer seasons as he chose. Upon 
leaving there, he began to travel with Denman 
Thompson, who took the part of Joshua Whit- 
comb in the "Old Homestead," a play that 
was presented in the majority of the leading 
cities of the United States. Following that 






f ■ 







ZEBULON POLHAMUS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



343 



he took part in other dramas of a similar char- 
acter. In 1894 failing health led him to re- 
tire from the stage; and he has since lived 
quietly at his home in \'ineland, of which 
place he first became a resident in 1868. 

On September 15, 1862, Mr. Wilson en- 
listed in Company H, Eighteenth Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry; and from that time until 
October 11, 1863, he took part in every en- 
gagement in which his regiment shared. On 
the latter date he received a gunshot wound in 
his shoulder, and his leg was hurt by his 
horse, which fell on him. From these injuries 
he has never fully recovered. At that time 
he was taken prisoner by the Confederates, 
and he believes that he was confined for some 
time in every Southern prison where officers 
were kept between Richmond and Charleston, 
S.C. On March i, 1865, he was released and 
passed through the lines at Wilmington, N.C. 
He was promoted from the ranks to the posi- 
tion of Second Lieutenant in March, 1863; 
and on April 28, 1863, he received the com- 
mission of First Lieutenant. At the time of 
his discharge, October 31, 1865, he was com- 
manding Company H of the Third Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry. 

On January 23, 1S61, Mr. Wilson was 
joined in marriage with Miss Nancy L. 
Lemon, a daughter of Robert Lemon, of Pitts- 
burg, Pa. They have two children, namely: 
Jennie, the wife of Frank B. Cunningham, of 
Vineland ; and Elizabeth, who married Edgar 
H. Spencer, of Vineland. Mr. Wilson is a 
member of Lyon Post, No. 10, Grand Army of 
the Republic, of which he is a Past Com- 



mander, and of Lodge No. i. Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of New York City. 
He and Mrs. Wilson are attendants and sup- 
porters of the Presbyterian church of this 
city. 



4^* »» 




APTAIN ZEBULON POLHAMUS, 



of Leesburg, of whom a portrait is 
here presented, is the owner am! 
master of an oyster schooner, and a fruit 
grower on an extensive scale. He was born 
February 14, 1838, in Delmont, N.J., son of 
Zebulon and Mary (Chance) Polhamus. His 
grandfather, John Polhamus, a native of 
F"lushing, L. I., who was a wheelwright by 
trade, established the first carriage-making 
business in Delmont, where he subseciuently 
resided for the rest of his life. 

Zebulon Polhamus, also a native of Del- 
mont, born April 13, 1804, acquired his 
education in the common schools. At an 
early age he began to learn the wheelwright's 
trade in his father's shop, where he remained 
until he came of age. After his marriage he 
bought the carriage-making business and the 
farm which had been carried on by his 
brother, John Polhamus, and successfully con- 
ducted both until his death, which occurred 
April 19, 1839, when he was but thirty-five 
years old. His wife, Mary, whom he married 
March 25, 1832, was a daughter of John 
Chance. She bore him four children, of 
whom Embley and Zebulon attained maturity. 
The parents were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Captain Zebulon Polhamus attended the 



544 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



common schools of his native town in his boy- 
hood. He began earning his living upon an 
oyster boat. Naturally ambitious, he im- 
proved every opportunity afforded him for ad- 
vancement, and in due time became master of 
a vessel. While still a young man he had 
built "Lillie Dale," which was the first 
schooner-rigged vessel to engage in the oyster- 
fishing industry. He has since followed the 
business with success, keeping well up with 
the times in the way of improvements, and is 
to-day one of the best-known oystermen upon 
this coast. He owns a valuable piece of agri- 
cultural property in Leesburg, consisting of 
one hundred and thirty-one acres of fertile 
land, which is one of the very best fruit farms 
in this locality. His orchards contain sixteen 
hundred peach-trees, from four hundred to five 
hundred pear-trees, and one hundred and 
twenty choice apple-trees. Nine acres are de- 
voted to the cultivation of strawberries, in the 
handling of which he employs forty American 
pickers, who receive a half-cent more per bo.x 
than is paid to foreign pickers. He also 
plants four or five acres of sweet potatoes, cuts 
forty tons of hay annually, keeps twenty head 
of cattle and an average of one hundred hens, 
and constantly employs three farm assistants. 

On March iS, i860, Mr. Polhamus wedded 
Sarah Thompson, daugliter of Ezra Thompson, 
of Leesburg. Of the eleven children borne 
by her, eight grew to maturity, namely : Mary, 
now deceased, who became the wife of Somers 
Whilden; Benajah ; Zebulon (third); William 
H. ; Alfred T. ; Emma S. ; Newton Earl; 
and Lena. Mr. Polhamus is connected with 



the local lodge of Odd Fellows, is an honorary 
member of the Junior Order of United Amer- 
ican Mechanics of Leesburg, is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias of Dorchester, and was 
a charter member of a tribe of Red Men 
which formerly existed in that town. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, but takes no active 
part in public affairs. Both he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist lipiscopal 
church, of which he has been a Trustee for 
the past twenty-two years. 




LFRED HOLMES LUPTON, the 
oldest brick manufacturer in Cumber- 
land County, was born in Bridge- 
ton, N.J., January 12, 1857. His father, 
Benjamin Lupton, is also a native of Bridge- 
ton, and was educated in the common schools 
of this city. He is a farmer and market 
gardener, and was at one time a member and 
Director of the' West Side Glass Company. 
He married Harriet, daughter of James 
Coombs, of Shirley, and had seven children, 
five of whom are now living — Edward P., 
Stephen, George C, Frank, and Alfred II. 
Both parents were members of the First Pres- 
byterian Church, of which the father was an 
Elder. 

Alfred IL Lupton was educated in the 
public schools of Bridgeton, subsequently 
learning the brickmaker"s trade, at which he 
worked as journeyman during his minority. 
He finally bought out his employer, at which 
time the concern turned out about four hun- 
dred thousand bricks per year. By Mr. Lup- 



BIOGRAPHICAI, REVIEW 



345 



ton's persistent energy he has so developed the 
business that the annual output is now from 
two to three million bricks. 

Mr. Lupton is a member of Brearly Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., of Bridgeton ; and he formerly 
belonged to the Odd Fellows. On March 5, 
1884, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
A. Smith, daughter of David Smith, of Dela- 
ware. They have one child, Alfred H., Jr. 




ALTER S. GARRISON, a promi- 
nent farmer and stock raiser of 
Hopewell township, in which he has resided 
since his birth, February 21, 1864, is a de- 
scendant of one of the oldest families of Cum- 
berland County. He is a son of Powell H. 
and Priscilla (Davis) Garrison and grandson 
of Powell Garrison, one of the early residents 
of Cedarville, N.J. He was educated in the 
common schools of Shiloh, at Shiloh Academy, 
and at the South Jersey Institute at Bridge- 
ton, which he attended for two years winters. 
He then worked on the home farm until his 
father's death, after that event coming into 
possession of the property, which includes 
about sixty-four acres of well-improved land. 
Besides his own farm Mr. Garrison manages 
that of Mr. Tice, which contains one hundred 
acres, and is known as the Maplewood stock 
farm. Mr. Garrison does a large business in 
dairying, retailing the milk in the city of 
Bridgeton, and thus furnishing employment 
for several men and teams. In his herd of 
cows are fifteen registered Holsteins, the 
finest and largest herd in the southern part of 



the State, one of which is the registered bull, 
Duke Clothilde, fourth, whose sire, Duke Clo- 
thilde, and dam, Lady Artis, were imported 
by Smith & Powell Company, Syracuse, N.Y. 
Besides these he has several graded Jerseys. 
He also deals in New York stock, having reli- 
able buyers in that State, who make a spe- 
cialty of buying milch cows. In addition to 
his dairy he has twenty horses, including a 
handsome registered stallion; and four men 
find steady employment in the care of the 
horses alone. All departments of the farm 
are managed on strict business principles, and 
Mr. Garrison is meeting with well-deserved 
success. On February 18, 1885, he was 
united in marriage with Miss Fannie M. Tice, 
a daughter of William Tice. A son and 
daughter have blessed their union — William 
Powell and Clara Tice. 

In political affiliation Mr. Garrison is a 
Democrat. He served creditably on the Com- 
mittee of Appeals of Hopewell, but with this 
exception the demands of his business have 
made it impossible for him to accept official 
position. He and his wife are members of 
the Baptist Church of Roadstown, of which he 
is a Trustee. 



M 



AVID H. OLIVER, M.D.. is one 
of the most popular physicians of 
Bridgeton. He was born in Port 
Elizabeth, N.J., April 20, 1855, son of Joseph 
E. and Margaret (Burch) Oliver. Joseph E. 
Oliver was a native of Cape May County, born 
November 30, 1S14. Having received a com- 
mon-school education, he learned the trade of 



346 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



shoemaker. Shortly after finishing his ap- 
prenticeship, he started in business for him- 
self, and carried it on successfully for the 
remainder of his life. Being a very intelli- 
gent man, he supplied the deficiencies of his 
early schooling by self-education. In this he 
was so successful that he was deemed a suit- 
able person to -fill the office of Judge of the 
County Court. The last time he sat on the 
bench was the occasion on which Howard and 
Ogden were sentenced for murder. He was 
also a Justice of the Peace for many years. 
His wife, whom he married January 4, 1835, 
was a daughter of Thomas and Rachel Burch. 
They became the parents of ten children; 
namely, Josephine G. , Thomas E., Eliza L., 
Jane A., Emma T., Hosea F., Joseph C, 
George W., David H., and William D. The 
parents were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal churcli. The father died September 3, 
1865, at the age of fifty-one years. His wife, 
who survived him twenty-one years, expired 
September 4, 18S6, in her seventy-first year. 

David H. Oliver, M.D., received his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools of 
Port I'".lizal)eth and Bridgeton. (3n leaving 
school he was employed for several years 
successively in the Engineer Corps, the Medi- 
cal Department, the Cavalry Corps, and the 
Interior Department of the P'ederal govern- 
ment, during which he travelled extensively 
in the West. After this, vvitli the i>uri)ose of 
joining the medical profession, he for one 
year read medicine with Dr. Moore, of 
Bridgeton. Then, in 1885, he entered Jeffer- 
son College, Philadelphia, pursued the usual 



three years' course, and graduated in the class 
of 1888. Soon after he came to Bridgeton, 
where he has since resided, and where, with 
an excellent professional reputation, he has 
acquired a remunerative practice. 

Dr. Oliver is still a bachelor. He is Presi- 
dent of the County Medical Society and a 
valued member of the State Medical Society. 
On July I, 1894, he was appointed Censor of 
the Medico-Chirurgical College of Philadel- 
phia. Outside his professional connections 
he is Commander of 13ridgeton Council, 
Legion of the Red Cross. Dr. Oliver has 
well earned the measure of success he enjoys 
by close and sympathetic attention to his 
patients, and by giving to all the best at his 
command. 

fs^OHN McMAHAN, an enterprising 
farmer of Landis township, N.J., was 
born in Northumberland County, Penn- 
sylvania, January 7, 1823, son of Samuel and 
Jennie (Reed) McMahan. Of Scotch-Irish 
extraction, his ancestors have been American 
for several generations. The first representa- 
tive of the family in this country was John 
McMahan, a native of the north of Ireland, 
who crossed the Atlantic in the year 1744 or 

1745- 

James McMahan, who was born in the north 
of Ireland in 1744, and was brought to this 
country by his father, the emigrant, was the 
grandfather of the present John McMalian. 
He lived with his father in Huntingdon 
County, Pennsylvania, on the banks of the 
Juniata River, until 1768, when he took up 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



347 



laiKl for himself in Northumberland County. 
He fought in both the F"rench and Indian War 
and the War of Independence. In the former 
he served as Sergeant, and in the Revolution 
he rose from the rank of Captain to that of 
Major. He was injured at the massacre of 
Freyling's Fort. 

It is related of him that one evening in the 
time of the War of Independence, as he was 
going to bring in his cows from pasture, he 
was surprised and captured by an Indian and a 
white man disguised as an Indian. After 
striking him on the head with a gun, they 
bound his hands with hickory bark, and were 
leading him away with them, when he man- 
aged to escape and get back in safety to the 
stockade on the banks of the Chillisquaque 
Creek. This was not the only time James 
McMahan had a narrow escape from Indians. 
While staying at the house of a family named 
White, on one occasion, he was obliged to go 
in search of his horse, which had strayed 
away. Returning after a short absence, he 
found the house in flames, and the members of 
the family all dead, massacred by the Indians. 
As he was riding to the house, he was sur- 
rounded by the savages, who fired at him. 
Hemmed in and wounded, but one desperate 
chance for escape remained. Throwing him- 
self from his horse, he swung himself, by the 
aid of a small tree, down the bank of the 
Juniata near by. As the bank overhung, he 
was able to run quite a distance unseen by his 
pursuers. Coming to a favorable spot for his 
purpose, he hastily bound his wound with his 
handkerchief, climbed up the bank, and se- 



creted himself in a rye field until night, when 
he swam across the river. He got across in 
safety, and subsequently reached his friends 
without further adventure. Major McMahan 
died in 1823, aged seventy-nine years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Murray, 
bore him nine children, of whom Samuel was 
the eighth son and ninth child. 

Samuel McMahan, who was born in North- 
umberland County, Pennsylvania, in Septem- 
ber, 1779, received his education in a sub- 
scription school. He remained under the pa- 
ternal roof-tree all his lifetime, and died June 
II, 1854. On March 17, 1803, he was united 
in matrimony with Jennie Reed, daughter of 
William Reed, of Sunbury, Pa. She bore 
him eleven children, of whom nine attained 
maturity; namely, Polly, Jennie, Rebecca, 
James, Margaret, William Reed, Samuel, 
Eliza Ann, and John. A daughter, Sarah, 
died in infancy. Jennie became the wife of 
James Blair; Rebecca, the wife of Samuel 
Blair; and Margaret, the wife of John Griffin. 
Both parents were members of the Presby- 
terian church. 

John McMahan was educated in the schools 
of Chillisquaque, Pa. He remained on the 
homestead, assisting in its management, until 
he was forty years old. In the spring of 1 863 
he came to Vineland, and purchased his pres- 
ent farm of sixty acres. Until recently he 
was wholly engaged in fruit growing, making 
a specialty of grapes, strawberries, and black- 
berries; but for the past six or seven years he 
has raised sweet potatoes exclusively. 

On October 5, 1847, he married Miss Eliz- 



348 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



abeth D. Ilendrickson, daughter of Adam 
llcndrickson, of Chillisquaque. Seven chil- 
dren were born of this union; namely, James 
II., Willard C, Thomas S., Mary Elizabeth, 
Samuel A., Frank, and John F. Mary E. is 
now the wife of Wilmer Martin, of Atlantic 
City. The father and mother are members of 
the Vineland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Mc- 
Mahan, who was a Trustee of the church for 
twenty-five years, together with his wife and 
brother constitute the sole survivors of the 
original incorporators. He has also served 
the community as a member of the Board of 
Elections for several terms. Industrious, 
painstaking, and skilful at his calling, he is a 
typical man of the busy population that has 
earned for Vineland the reputation of a human 
beehive. 



fAMES MOORE TORRENS, glass 
blower, an industrious and highly es- 
teemed citizen of Millville, N.J., was 
born near Williamstown, this State, October 
14, 1845, son of Alexander and Margaret 
(Moore) Torrens. Mr. Torrens's paternal an- 
cestors for some generations were residents of 
County Antrim, Ireland, where his grand- 
father, Robert Torrens, was a prosperous 
farmer. lie married Mary Watt, and twelve 
children were born to them, ten of whom 
grew to maturity, namely: Martha; Mary, 
who became the wife of Adam Elliott; Eliz- 
abeth, wife of Alexander McKeygan and 
mother of the late Hon. William A. Mc- 
Keygan, M.C., who was an intimate friend 
of William J. Bryan, the Democratic nominee 



for President of the United States; Alex- 
ander, Mr. Torrens's father; Robert, who 
is no longer living; William Watt; Nancy 
Jane; James; Stuart; Margaret, who married 
Hugh Whittle; and two who died in infancy. 

Alexander Torrens was born in County An- 
trim, April 15, 1812. He acquired an or- 
dinary education in his native land, and re- 
sided with his parents upon the farm until 
reaching manhood, when he learned the trade 
of a stone mason. At twenty-four years of 
age he emigrated to the United States, set- 
tling in Williamstown, N.J., where he worked 
as a charcoal burner until 1850, when he came 
to Millville, and entered the employ of Whit- 
all, Tatum & Co., with whom he remained for 
some thirty-five years. In 1885 he retired 
from active labor. His first wife, whom he 
married January 21, 1836, was Margaret 
Moore, daughter of Archibald Moore, of 
County Antrim. By this union there were 
six children, of whom one died in infancy. 
The others were Robert; Alexander, Jr.; 
James M., the subject of this sketch; Mary 
Jane, who died at the age of two years; and 
Margaret Jane, who became the wife of Rob- 
ert McOuilkiii, and is no longer living. 
Alexander Torrens's first wife died in 1857; 
and on December 31, 1869, he wedded for 
his second wife, Matilda, daughter of Will- 
iam Blair, of Millville. Mr. and Mrs. Alex- 
ander Torrens are members of the Presby- 
terian church, of which he has been an Elder 
for many years. 

James Moore Torrens was educated in the 
public schools of Millville; and at the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



349 



sixteen he began life for himself by entering 
the employ of Whitall, Tatum & Co., for 
whom he worked for about two years. In 
1863 he commenced to serve an apprenticeship 
at the glass-blower's trade, becoming in due 
time an expert journeyman; and he has since 
continued to follow that occupation, being still 
in the employ of the company with whom he 
learned his trade. He is connected with 
Millville Lodge, No. 47, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and Millville Encampment, 
No. 27. 

Mr. Torrens and Esther Pyle, daughter of 
George W. Pyle, Sr., were married on Novem- 
ber g, 1867. They have two children, 
namely: Bella C, wife of Bruce Simmermen, 
of Camden, N.J.; and Lottie D. Mr. and 
Mrs. James M. Torrens arc members of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Church. 




lEV. CHARLES A. BREWSTER 
rector of Trinity Protestant Episco- 
pa\ Church of Vineland, N.J., was 
born in Columbia, Me., January 20, 1847. 
He is the son of John \V. A. and Caroline A. 
(Wilkin) Brewster, and comes of an ancient 
family of the "English landed gentry," being 
a lineal descendant of Elder William Brews- 
ter, who came to this country on the "May- 
flower"" in 1620, as the spiritual leader of the 
Pilgrim Fathers. Before leaving his native 
P2ngland, William Brewster had held from 
1594 to the close of September, 1607, the 
office of Postmaster, or, as it was called, Post, 
at Scrooby, where he occupied Scrooby Manor. 



His biographer, the Rev. Ashbel Steele, says, 
"Brewster must have had influence at court 
to be placed in this office," which "required 
the services of employees under him, and suit- 
able accommodations, livery, and attendant 
servants," the varied duties of the post involv- 
ing greater responsibilities and demanding 
greater capacities in those early times than at 
the present day. 

Charles Royal Brewster, son of a Dr. Brews- 
ter, of Connecticut, and grandfather of the 
Rev. Charles A. Brewster, was a native of 
Connecticut and a physician. He went to 
Buxton, Me., in early manhood, and there 
married and settled permanently. His wife 
was a daughter of the Rev. Paul Coffin, D.D. 
(See History of Buxton, Me.) His son, 
John W. A. Brewster, was born in Buxton, 
Me. When about twenty years of age he 
went to Boston, and engaged in trade as an 
importer, being so successful in business that 
he was able to retire at the age of thirty-five. 
He spent the rest of his life in Columbia, 
Me., where he had bought extensive tracts of 
land, and in Goshen, Orange County, N.Y. , 
the native place of his wife. Mrs. ]?rewster 
was a daughter of General James Wilkin, of 
Goshen, and, like her husband, was a member 
of a distinguished family. 

Her grandfather, who was one of the first 
settlers of Goshen, was a magistrate under the 
King. Her father. General James Wilkin, 
was one of^-the leading men of his day, serving 
successively as Speaker of the State legis- 
lature. President of the Senate, and a member 
of Congress. He was a Ruling Elder in the 



3.i" 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Presbyterian church for forty years. General 
Wilkin died at the age of eighty-three. His 
sons and grandsons also were men of ability 
and influence. One son, the Hon. Samuel J. 
Wilkin, was a prominent lawyer and advocate 
in the State of New York and a member of 
the State legislature and Senate. He was 
also a member of Congress, and was at one 
time candidate for Lieutenant Governor of 
New York. His two sons, Alexander and 
Westcott, took an active part in public affairs 
in Minnesota. Ale.xander, who was Secretary 
of the Territory, was an officer of the United 
States Army during the Mexican War, and 
was one of the first men to enlist at the com- 
mencement of the late Civil War. He was 
Captain of Company A, First Minnesota Reg- 
iment of Volunteer Infantry, was subsequently 
Colonel of the Ninth Regiment, and, while 
acting Brigadier-general, was killed. The 
Hon. Westcott Wilkin was for many years 
Judge of the Superior Court of Minnesota. 

Charles A. Brewster received his early and 
preparatory education in private schools in 
Goshen, N.Y., and IClizabeth, N.J. He en- 
tered Princeton College in August, 1864, and 
graduated with honors in 1S68, taking in reg- 
ular course the degrees of A.B. and A.M. 
Having decided to adopt the legal profession, 
he entered the Columbia College Law School 
in New York City, where he studied for a 
year, and then read Blackstone in the office of 
Thompson & Weeks, a leading law firm of 
Poughkeepsie. Admitted to the bar of the 
State of New York in June, 1870, he practised 
for six years, three years in Poughkeepsie and 



three years in New York City, in the mean 
time doing considerable work as a journalist 
and as a lecturer on literary subjects. In 
1876 he determined to enter the ministry; 
and, with that end in view, he spent one year 
in private study, travelling at the same time 
in Canada and the South. 

In the fall of 1877 he entered the Theologi- 
cal Seminary at Princeton; and, after complet- 
ing a three years' course, he was called to the 
Memorial Presbyterian Church of Newark, 
N.J., where he was ordained by the Presby- 
tery of Newark. This church was a mission 
when Mr. Brewster took charge of it; but 
within a year he developed it into an organ- 
ized and self-supporting parish, and it is now 
one of the most successful in that city. His 
pastorate covered three years. After two 
years of further study and extensive travel in 
Europe Mr. Brewster was called to the First 
Presbyterian Church of Cape May City, N.J., 
and installed as pastor by the Presbytery of 
West Jersey. There he labored successfully 
for about six years and a half, and then, as a 
result of deep study and research, entered the 
Protestant Episcopal church, receiving con- 
firmation in October, 1891. He was received 
by the Bishop and Standing Committee of the 
Diocese of New Jersey, as a candidate for 
Holy Orders and spent the winter of 1891 in 
Florida, engaged in missionary work as a lay 
reader under the Bishop of that State. Re- 
turning North in the spring of 1892, he was 
ordained Deacon in May by the Bishop of 
New Jersey. Called to the rectorship of 
Trinity Church, Vineland, he entered upon 



f'^ 




WILLIAM A. DAGGETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



353 



the duties of his office in September, 1S92, 
and was ordained to the priesthood in Decem- 
ber of the same year. A man of deep learn- 
ing, great executive ability, and magnetic per- 
sonality, Mr. Brewster invariably infuses new 
life into his charge; and many new members 
have been added to Trinity Parish since it has 
been under his direction. 

January 20, 1880, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss E. Gertrude Taylor, of 
Brookline, Mass., daughter of William Hart 
Taylor, one of the pioneers of Chicago. Mr. 
Taylor, who is now eighty-six years of age, 
was a leading man in Chicago when its popu- 
lation was little over three hundred, and was 
active in laying the foundations of the present 
great city. His daughter, Mrs. Brewster, was 
born in Chicago, but spent the greater part of 
her life before marriage in Brookline. She 
was a student at Vassar College during the 
first two years of its institution. Mr. and 
Mrs. Brewster lost one child in infancy, and 
have three living — Carrie Maud, Charles 
Bertram, and Gertrude Lucille. 




ILLIAM A. DAGGETT, the senior 
member of the firm of W. A. Dag- 
gett & Co. of Vineland, N.J., was born in 
Robbinslon, Washington County, Me., Au- 
gust 30, 1823. His father, Aaron Daggett, 
was born May 2, 1774 (the year that marks 
the passage of the Boston Port Bill), at 
Holmes's Hole, Martha's Vineyard, or, as it 
is now called. Vineyard Haven. 

Having finished his education, Aaron Dag- 



gett carried on the hardware business in New 
York City. Moving to Bangor, Me., he 
opened a grocery store, and afterward went to 
Deer Island. About 1820 he moved to Rob- 
binston. Me., and there bought land, erected 
the necessary buildings, and with the help of 
his boys made a fine farm. 15y trade he was a 
cabinet-maker; and this, with farming, he 
followed the rest of his life. For many years 
he was a Justice of the Peace. He served his 
country in the War of 181 2. He died Decem- 
ber 29, 1863, eighty-nine years of age. His 
wife was before marriage Miss Mary Mc- 
Laughlin, of Bangor, Me. Mr. and Mrs. 
Aaron Daggett had eight children; namely, 
Charles, Allen, George, Lavina, William, 
Elniira, Daniel, and one, the eighth, without 
name. The latter died with its mother, who 
was then but thirty -six years of age. 

At twenty-one years of age William A. 
Daggett, the subject of this biography, went 
to Shelburne, N. S., and there engaged in the 
lumber business two years. From there he 
removed to Mill's Village, Queens County, 
continuing the same business four years. 
Moving to Liverpool Milton, on the Mersey 
River, he ran a gang-mill nine years for 
Freeman Tupper; and at the same place he 
worked as a millwright for three years. He 
then went to Jordan River, Shelburne County, 
and ran a gang-mill in connection with doing 
millwright work three years. In October, 1864, 
he with his family removed to South Vine- 
land, N.J., bought land, built a house, and 
commenced farming, planting fruit-trees, etc. 

In 1869 W. A. Daggett secured a patent on 



354 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a baking-pan, making two improvements on 
the same in 1870 and still another in 1872, 
and securing patents on these improvements. 
The pan is now what is known as the Daggett 
roaster and baker. For several years, be- 
tween 1873 and 1880, he worked at carpenter- 
ing, and during that time secured several val- 
uable patents on other articles. He now has 
in his factory seventeen successful iron-work- 
ing machines of his own invention, con- 
structed especially for the use of the firm. 
These inventions have, no doubt, contributed 
largely to the business success of the firm. 

These bakers were manufactured on royalty 
until 1880, when Mr. W. A. Daggett, in com- 
pany with his son, Arthur C, commenced 
manufacturing in a small way, at first employ- 
ing but three or four men. Under their 
efficient management the business increased 
so as to require a working force of from ten 
to fifteen men, who turned out about six hun- 
dred double bakers a week, shipping them all 
over the United States. The firm built and 
now occupy a three-story brick building, con- 
taining thirteen thousand square feet of floor- 
ing. They are now beginning the manufact- 
ure of an improved coffee-mill, also a lamp 
stand. 

Apart from the business of the firm, in 
1895 A. C. Daggett commenced the manufact- 
ure of women's, misses', and chiUlren's fine 
shoes. W. F. Daggett, brother of A. C, has 
conducted a branch office in Chicago, 111., for 
the sale of goods manufactured by W. A. 
Daggett & Co., and has now opened a shoe 
store in Austin, 111. 



W. A. Daggett was married in Liverpool, 
N.S., September 5, 1846, to Miss Aimee M., 
daughter of Simeon and Aimee Minard Har- 
rington. Mr. and Mrs. Daggett have had 
eight children, seven of whom are living: 
James A. ; William Allen, who died an in- 
fant; Ellen M., wife of Elliott Dudley, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Sarah Louisa, wife of 
J. W. Adams, of Vineland, N.J. ; Augustus; 
Arthur C. ; William F. ; and Hattie H., who 
is a trained nurse. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. 
Daggett celebrated their golden wedding 
September 5, 1896. They are both members 
of the Baptist church. 

Arthur C. Daggett, junior member of the 
firm of W. A. Daggett & Co., was born in 
Liverpool, N.S., July 18, i860. In 1S64 he 
came with his parents to Vineland. After 
completing his education at the high school, 
he worked for a short time in a shoe factor}' 
and afterward in a retail shoe store in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., where he undoubtedly laid the 
foundation for future prosperity. On May 7, 
1888, he was married to Josephine, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dare, of V^ine- 
land, N.J. 

W. A. Daggett is President of the National 

Direct Legislation Reform Society (of \'ine- 

land, N.J.), whose purpose is to educate the 

people to the advantages of the initiative and 

j referendum, thus making it possible to obtain 

j just laws for the whole people. In 1890 

W. A. Daggett took an outing trip to Florida, 

j liking the climate so well that in 1891 he 

purchased land in Monte Vista, Lake County, 

had it cleared, and a grove of twelve hundred 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



355 



trees set out. At this time he, with his fam- 
ily, went to Florida to superintend the work. 
In 1893 he went from Florida to Chicago, at- 
tended the World's Fair a month, and then 
returned to Vineland. A. C. Daggett also 
has land in Monte Yista, Fla., adjoining 
W. A. Daggett's, and a grove of six hundred 
trees. Adjoining A. C. Daggett's, Miss 
Hattie Daggett has twenty acres, with a grove 
of three hundred trees. She is now having a 
sanatorium built for invalids. It is situated 
on high pine land, fronting a beautiful clear- 
water lake. 




ARDON GIFFORD, who is now liv- 
ing in retirement upon a farm in 
Landis township, N.J., was formerly 
a prosperous blacksmith and carriage builder 
in Vineland. He was born in Dartmouth, 
Mass., July 29, 1834, son of Leonard and Ann 
(White) Gifford. Leonard GifTord was also a 
native of Dartmouth. After receiving his ed- 
ucation in the district school, he remained at 
home until his father's death, at first helping 
on the farm, but afterward having full charge 
of it. His father, Samuel Gifford, who was a 
Quaker, followed the occupation of farmer, 
and was a large real estate owner. Upon los- 
ing his father, Leonard removed to Naushon 
Island, where he died two years afterward. 
He and his wife, Ann White Gifford, daugh- 
ter of William White, of Westport, Mass., had 
nine children; namely, Chester, William, 
Abraham, Hannah, Samuel, Cynthia, Alex- 
ander, Eliza, and Pardon. Cynthia became 
the wife of Solomon Howland ; and Hannah, 



the wife of Asher Chester. Eliza died at the 
age of twelve years. Both father and mother 
were members of the Baptist church. Leonard 
Gifford, who served the society as Deacon, 
was a devoted Christian worker and a most 
hospitable entertainer of Baptist preachers, 
who made his house their headquarters for the 
district. 

Pardon Gifford obtained his education in 
the district schools of the localities, where his 
parents resided during his boyhood. From 
the time he was eleven years old until he 
reached the age of nineteen, he earned his own 
living by working on farms. He then went 
to Bedford, Mass., where he served an appren- 
ticeship to a blacksmith, and after his time 
expired worked as a journeyman for seven 
months. He then entered into a partnership 
with D. Sherman, and did his part in carry- 
ing on a successful business until 1862, a 
period of eight years, under the firm name of 
Sherman & Gifford. In 1863, January 23, he 
came to Vineland with his family, and started 
a general blacksmith antl carriage building 
establishment, thereby becoming the pioneer 
blacksmith of the place. He was here ac- 
tively engaged in his calling for twenty-five 
years, doing an especially large business in 
the manufacture of hoes and axes, and becom- 
ing a leader in his particular line of industry. 

Having acquired by his unremitting toil a 
fortune ample enough to secure the future of 
himself and family, he sold out in 1888, and 
spent the following five years in travelling 
over the country for pleasure. His residence 
in Vineland, built in 1862 by Captain Post, 



3S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



of Connecticut, was the first dwelling erected 
in the city. The second was put up by Orin 
Peckhard, from Hamilton, N.J. Mr. Gifford 
bought his present place in 1891, since which 
time he has remodelled the house and barn on 
larger and improved plans, besides erecting 
new out-buildings and two cottages. Of the 
thirty-two acres of land, ten are devoted to 
the raising of fruit, and twenty are kept under 
grass. Mr. Gifford does this, not for the 
money returns, but wholly as an agreeable oc- 
cupation. He also keeps some doves, and his 
stock is of a select grade. The property does 
credit both to his taste and labor, for it is a 
beautiful seat in a district distinguished for 
its beautiful country homes. 

In January, 1S60, he was united in matri- 
mony with Miss Amanda Potter, daughter of 
Ichabod Potter, of VVestport, Mass. By this 
union he became the father of a son, P'rederick 
Potter. Mrs. Amanda Potter was cut off in 
her bloom three years after her happy wed- 
ding; and two years later, in 1865, Mr. Gif- 
ford contracted a second marriage with Miss 
Eliza Vail, daughter of Captain Jolin R. Vail, 
of Hartford, Conn. By this marriage he be- 
came the father of four children; namely, 
Walter, Nellie, Gertrude, and one other with 
whom they were early called to part. Nellie 
is now the wife of Mr. Stanley Searles, an es- 
teemed resident of .Stamford, Conn. lioth 
Mr. and Mrs. Gifford are members of the 
Methodist I'^piscopal church. Mr. Gifford 
was one of the four organizers of the society, 
was the first President of the Board of Trus- 
tees, and is the only one of the organizers of 



the first class now residing in \'ineland. 
During his connection with the church he has 
served in most of the offices to which laymen 
are eligible. 



^yENRY HAMPTON SPENCE, agent 
and superintendent of the Cadwal- 
ader estate, which in Heislerville 
alone comprises nearly five thousand acres, 
was born in this town, December 31, 1826. 
His parents were William and Sarah H. 
(Hampton) Spence. Mr. Spence is of Ger- 
man descent, and is of the third generation of 
his family born in New Jersey, his great- 
grandfather, a native of Germany, having been 
one of the early settlers in Burlington County. 
His grandfather, George Spence, who was 
born in that county in 1766, died in 1848. 
He married Deborah Denight, and reared 
the following children: Letitia, Catherine, 
George, William, and Elizabeth. 

William Spence, son of George, was born 
in Heislerville, and educated in the common 
schools. He lived on his father's farm until 
his marriage, when he established a home of 
his own; and for a number of years he sup- 
ported his family by farming on shares. He 
eventually purchased a farm, and spent his 
last years under the shadow of his own vine 
and fig-tree, working industriously to the very 
last. Mr. William Spence was highly re- 
spected in IIeisler\'ille. He served as Sur- 
veyor of the Highways for several years. His 
wife was a daughter of Henry Hampton, M.D., 
a well-known and esteemed physician of Lees- 
burg, N.J. Mr. and Mrs. William Spence 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



357 



were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They were the parents of eleven 
children, eight of whom attained maturity, 
namely: Sarah Ann, who married James Hol- 
lingshead; Edward P.; Henry Hampton; 
George; Isaac; John; Abigail, wife of Will- 
iam Major; and Clement T. 

Henry Hampton Spence, the subject of this 
sketch, received a common-school education 
in Leesburg. When quite small he went to 
live with his maternal grandfather. Dr. Hamp- 
ton, who had a farm, on which the boy learned 
to make himself useful; and as he grew older 
he assumed heavier duties until a large share 
of the farm work devolved upon him. When 
the time came for him to establish a home, 
he engaged in carpenter work, taking con- 
tracts for building, a business which he fol- 
lowed until after the war. He was then en^ 
gaged in farming on his own account until 
1S96, when he was appointed manager of the 
estate of John Cadwalader, of Philadelphia. 
This landed property comprises forty-eight 
hundred acres in Heislerville and about one 
thousand acres in other townships, and the 
management involves a great deal of care and 
responsibility. Mr. Spence also has a truck 
farm of his own, on which he raises some 
eight acres of strawberries, employing annu- 
ally twenty-one imported pickers. 

On September 12, 1846, he was united in 
marriage with Judith Stites, daughter of Rich- 
ard Stites, of Cape May. She was born De- 
cember 8, 1827, and died May 19, 1890. 
Mr. Spence was- a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. She was the mother of 



eight children, namely: Sarah H., born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1850, now wife of George Pritchet, 
of Millville, N.J.; P>anklin L., born June 
29, 1852, of Millville; Anne C, born Oc- 
tober 6, 1854, wife of John Robinson, of 
Leesburg; Judith N., born July 16, 1859, 
wife of Reuben Hoffman, of Millville; Clara 
T., born September 17, 1861, wifu of Anson 
Thompson; Theresa, born June 14, 1864, wife 
of Howard Sayre, of Millville; Elfrida, born 
September 3, 1866; and William, born July 
27, 1870. 

Mr. Spence has long occupied a position of 
prominence in Heislerville, taking an active 
part in affairs of public interest. He has 
served as Surveyor of Highways and Township 
Committee for twenty years, and has officiated 
for a number of years as Commissioner of Ap- 
peals. A man of sound judgment and con- 
siderable executive ability, well known in tlie 
town which has been his home for seventy 
years, he enjoys the esteem and confidence of 
the community. 



< * > » > 



TT^APTAIN LAFAYETTE HENDER- 
I J| SON, who is successfully engaged in 

^ ' the oyster business at I^eesburg, 

Cumberland County, N.J., was born in this 
town, January 31, 1853, his parents being La- 
fayette and Elizabeth (Chance) Henderson. 

His father was the son of Joseph Hender- 
son, and was also a native of Leesburg. He 
received his early intellectual training in the 
common schools of this town ; and when he 
was yet a mere lad he began to follow the 
water, first in a wood shallop, and later, from 



358 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



his twenty-third year, in a coasting-vessel. 
When he was twenty-eight years of age he was 
appointed to the captaincy of a vessel which 
was engaged in the carrying trade, principally 
between the ports of Boston and Philadelphia. 
On September 30, 1847, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth Chance, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Zadoc Chance. Into their 
home came successively five children, namely: 
Sarah, who is now the wife of Jeremiah Whil- 
don, of Delmont, N.J. ; Zadoc C. ; Lafayette; 
Elizabeth, who is now Mrs. Ichabod Whildon, 
of Delmont; and Lucy, who died at the age of 
twelve years. Mr. Lafayette Henderson, Sr., 
in political affiliation was numbered among 
the Democrats. His decease occurred Sep- 
tember 20, 1866, in his fortieth year. Mrs. 
Elizabeth C. Henderson has been for years as- 
sociated with the Methodist Episcopal Church 
of Leesburg. 

Her son, Lafayette Henderson, was edu- 
cated in the public schools of his native town; 
and after the completion of his course of study 
he began to follow the sea. He first sailed 
on a schooner engaged in carrying wood to 
Philadelphia and in transporting coal thence 
to Hoston, Marblehead, and intermediate 
points. After several years spent in such 
coasting trade he directed his attention to the 
oyster business, in which he has been success- 
fully occupied for twenty years. In 1877, 
wlicn he was only about twenty-four years of 
age, he became the captain of a vessel; and 
for the last twelve years he has owned a boat. 
On September 18, 1876, Mr. Henderson 
married Miss Elizabeth C. Langley, a daugh- 



ter of Mr. and Mrs. William Langley, of Del- 
mont, N.J. Mr. Langley was born in Salem 
County, New Jersey, on February 25, 1809; 
and he followed throughout life general hus- 
bandry, raising grain crops especially. He 
served his fellows in the capacity of Constable 
for the long period of twenty-five or thirty 
years, and for many years also as Overseer of 
the Poor. He wedded Miss Sarah Christian, 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaiah Christian, 
of East Creek, Cape May County, N.J., and 
they became the parents of four children, 
namely: Sabilla, who died at the age of si.\'- 
teen; William; Elizabeth C, who is now 
Mrs. Henderson; and George. Mr. and Mrs. 
Christian were both identified with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church of Eldora, Cape May 
County, N.J. Two children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Henderson; namely, Lucy and Will- 
iam L. 

Socially, Mr. Henderson has been asso- 
ciated with the Order of Knights of Pythias 
for over twenty years, being a member of Dor- 
chester Lodge, No. 17, of Dorchester, N.J. 
In political affiliation he has always been a 
stanch Democrat, ever supporting the ]irin- 
ciples and the candidates of that party. Re- 
ligiously, both he and his wife are in fellow- 
ship with the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Leesburg, of which the former is an honored 
Trustee. 



(JONATHAN LORE, a well-known farmer 
of Port Elizabeth, Cumberland County, 
N.J., was born here on June 2, 1845, 
the year which marks the beginning of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



359 



Mexican War. His parents were David and 
Hannah (Compton) Lore. Hezekiah Lore, 
the earliest known ancestor ' of the family, 
came across Maurice River, and was captured 
by the Manumuskin Indians. About 1750 he 
settled on the farm now occupied by Jonathan, 
his great-great-grandson, who is the subject of 
this biography. The barn, twenty-five feet 
by forty feet, built by Hezekiah Lore, is still 
standing; antl the house near by is one of the 
oldest in the township. 

Hezekiah's son David, first, married and 
had a son, Jonathan, first, a native of this 
town, who was extensively engaged in farm- 
ing. He served as Freeholder and as a mem- 
ber of the Township Committee, and was one 
of thirty-five appointed in Bridgeton, N.J., 
to see that the recommendations of the First 
Continental Congress, held at Philadelphia on 
September 5, 1774, be carried out; namely, 
that no goods which came from Great Britain 
or any of its dependencies be used after the 
next March. Me married Sarah S. Mason, of 
Dividing Creek; and they had seven children, 
only one of whom is now living, Ann Maria 
by name. Mr. Jonathan Lore and his wife, 
Sarah, the grandparents of the subject of this 
sketch, were highly respected members of the 
Baptist church. 

Their son, David Lore, second, was born on 
the old homestead, and acquired his education 
in the schools of his native town, where he re- 
mained until he attained his majority. Then, 
in company with his brother Jonathan, second, 
he opened a general merchandise store, which 
he managed during the rest of his life. The 



firm also engaged in cutting and sawing lum- 
ber, which they shipped to Philadelphia. 
David Lore, second, married Hannah, his 
brother Jonathan's widow, who was a daughter 
of James Compton, of Mauricetown. By this 
union there were five children — Jonathan, 
third, of Port Elizabeth; David, who died 
when he was young; Harry; Charles; and an- 
other David. The mother was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. The father died 
on July 7, 1853. 

Jonathan Lore, son of David and Hannah C. 
Lore, received his education in the schools of 
his native township, going subsequently to 
Greenwich to live on a farm. When he was 
about thirty years of age he returned to Port 
Elizabeth, and opened a general merchandise 
store, which he carried on successfully for 
about ten years. Mr. Lore then sold the plant, 
and came to the farm he now occupies, con- 
sisting of one hundred acres of tillable land 
and about fifty acres of timber. About three 
acres are devoted to the culture of strawber- 
ries, but the principal crops are corn and oats. 
He likewise cuts on an average from fifteen 
to twenty tons of hay. He has a dairy of 
twelve head of cattle and makes butter. He 
also keeps six horses and raises colts. 

In politics Mr. Lore is a Republican. In 
1 888 he was elected Collector of the township, 
which position he has held continuously for 
nearly nine years. Mr. Lore has also offici- 
ated at different times as a member of the 
Township Committee, serving in all about 
fourteen years. Fraternally, he is identified 
with the Maurice River Lodge, No. 17, 



360 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Knights of Pythias, and the Leesburg Coun- 
cil, lunior Order of United American Me- 
chanics. 

The maiden name of liis wife, to whom he 
was united in marriage on June 4, 1867, was 
Mary E. Murphy. Her father was Stephen 
Murphy. Mr. and Mrs. Lore are the parents 
of six children — Walter, Harry, Beulah, Jon- 
athan, Jr., Elizabeth, and David. They at- 
tend and financially aid the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which Mrs. Lore is a highly 
respected member. 




|LIJAH R. PAR\TN, who enjoys the 
distinction of being not only the old- 
est but also the leading insurance agent of 
Deerfield Street, New Jersey, was born here 
on March 8, 1844, son of Jeremiah and Anna 
M. (Riley) Parvin. 

The lineal representatives of the family for 
four generations back bore the Christian name 
of Jeremiah. They were among the early set- 
tlers of this section of New Jersey. Jeremiah 
Parvin, the father of Elijah R., was born in 
Cumberland County in 1802. He was a 
farmer by occupation and a prominent citizen. 
During two terms he represented Cumber- 
land County in the State legislature. Li 1848 
he was killed by the falling of a tree, he being 
then but forty-si.\ years of age. He was 
twice married, and by his first wife had three 
children. His second wife, who was before 
marriage Miss Anna M. Riley, was a daughter 
of Elijah D. and Maria Riley. Her father 
followed farming, and was one of the leading 



men of the town, his judgment being often re- 
lied upon in the settlement of important ques- 
tions. For a number of years he was a Justice 
of the Peace and conveyancer. He was a 
Ruling Elder of the Deerfield Street Presby- 
terian Church for over thirty years and a mem- 
ber over forty-five years. During the early 
history of the church he was one of its main 
supporters; and he assisted in the erection 
of the stone edifice, which stood within sight 
of his lifelong home. This second marriage of 
Jeremiah Parvin was blessed by the birth of 
four children, as follows: Alexander, of Okla- 
homa; Furman, of Salem; Cornelia, the wife 
of Daniel H. Padget ; and Elijah R. Their 
mother died on January 28, 1888, at seventy- 
eight years of age. Both parents were com- 
municants of the Deerfield Street Presby- 
terian Church for many years. 

Elijah R. Parvin, having completed his edu- 
cational course at the South Jersey Institute 
in Bridgeton, taught school for nineteen years 
at various places in Cumberland and Salem 
Counties. Owing to the loss of an eye in 
1859, he was disqualified for service in the 
Civil War; but his brothers Alexander and 
Furman served through that great conflict. 
Before he finally gave up teaching, Mr. Parvin 
took up the insurance business on a small 
scale; and he has since acquired a large clien- 
tage. It is now twenty-four years since he 
started in this line. For an equal length of 
time he has had charge of the old Deerfield 
Presbyterian Church, which is one of the old- 
est in this part of the country, its one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary having been celebrated 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



361 



in 18S7. On December 24, 1868, Mr. Parvin 
was married to Miss Addie C. Harker, a 
daughter of Elias Haynes Harker, a farmer of 
Hopewell. She was born on March 20, 1845. 
The first town office held by Mr. Parvin was 
that of Clerk, in which he served very faith- 
fully for ten years. Following that he held 
the office of Commissioner of Deeds up to 
about 1884, when he was elected Assessor, 
first for a term of five years and twice since 
for terms of three years each. He is a mem- 
ber of Cohansey Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Bridgeton, and also of the 
Brotherhood of the Union of Deerfield. Mr. 
and Mrs. Parvin attend and help to support 
the Presb)'tci ian church. 



<^»^> 



(JOSHUA C. ADAMS, who is engaged 
extensively in the culture and market- 
ing of cranberries at Vineland, Cum- 
berland County, N.J., was born at Martha 
Furnace, N.J., January 4, 1858, son of Zeph- 
aniah and Eleanor (Chambers) Adams. 

11 is father, whose birth occurred in iSoi at 
Jenkins Neck, N.J., enjoyed in childhood and 
youth the advantages of a common-school edu- 
cation; and for many years from the conclu- 
sion of his period of pupilage he followed the 
employment of an ore raiser, extracting iron 
ore from the meadows for use at the furnaces 
in the town. When a young man he pur- 
chased a farm of thirty acres, on which he was 
simultaneously engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits until 1850, when, disposing of it, he 
removed to Hillsboro, Ohio. He remained 



there only about a year, and mean time did 
not engage in any business. Returning then 
to the vicinity of his birth, he bought an es- 
tate located about three miles from his former 
home, on which he lived in retirement from 
the active duties of life until his decease. 

Mr. Zephaniah Adams was united in matri- 
mony with Miss Eleanor Chambers, the daugh- 
ter of Alexander Chambers, of Irish descent, 
and tiieir union was blessed in the birth of a 
large family of thirteen children, eleven of 
whom attained maturity, namely: Eliza, who 
is now deceased; Franklin B. ; Frederick; 
John W. ; Lydia, who is now the wife of Ed- 
ward Buzby, of Chatsworth, N.J. ; Hannah, 
who is now Mrs. Amos P. Cline; Theophilus 
H.; Mary J., now the wife of Ebenezer E. 
Adare, of Philadelphia; Joseph R.; Margaret 
E., who resides at Long Branch, N.J., as the 
wife of Theodore Howland; and Joshua C, of 
Vineland. In religious belief both Mr. and 
Mrs. Zephaniah Adams were Methodists, and 
were affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Jenkins Neck. He departed this 
life in 1858. His wife, Mrs. Eleanor C. 
Adams, is still living. 

Joshua C. Adams, with whose name tiiis 
biographical record begins, obtained his edu- 
cation in the common schools of Shamong, 
N.J. In 188 1 he entered the employment of 
the Central Railroad of New Jersey as station 
agent at Lakewood. After continuing in that 
capacity about a year he removed to Shamong 
(now Chatsworth), where he resided for about 
a decade, and whence he changed his residence 
in 1894 to V'ineland, his present home. 



362 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



While living at Shamong he jjurchased a cran- 
berry meadow about three hundred and fifty 
acres in extent, on which he is largely and 
successfully engaged in the cultivation of that 
fruit. The annual yield is from three thou- 
sand to five thousand bushels of cranberries, 
for which he finds a ready market in New 
York City and Philadelphia. 

Mr. Adams and Miss Emma J. Mcllvaine, 
the daughter of Joseph M. Mcllvaine, of 
Batsto, N.J., were married on August 28, 
1 88 1, and are the parents of five children; 
namely, Ada Virginia, Florence L., Eleanor, 
Carroll C, and Beatrice Eudora. Mr. and 
Mrs. Adams are Methodists in religious be- 
lief, and regularly attend the church of that 
persuasion in Vineland, to the support of 
which they are liberal contributors. 




lARLES KLINE LANDIS, Sr., of 
\'incland, is the founder of the charm- 
ing town in which he resides. At 
one time both the town and its founder had a 
world-wide celebrity. By its establishment 
he has been credited with having solved many 
problems of social science. However this 
may be, several of the principles put into ex- 
ecution by the settlement of Vineland were 
quickly adopted by other communities, and 
now find general acceptance in civilized coun- 
tries. Mr. Landis is the father and Vine- 
land was the cradle of "local option," so 
called, that has made such progress as a de- 
fence against the liquor evil. It also seems 
probable that he has finally answered the vital 



hygienic question of how best to dispose of a 
city's sewage, by utilizing it to make Vine- 
land the garden of the Middle States. 

Mr. Landis was born in Philadelphia, March 
16, 1833, son of Michael G. and Mary Lewis 
(Quinn) Landis. By each parent he comes of 
a long line of American ancestry, and on the 
father's side he is of Italian extraction. The 
original name was Landi, last borne in the six- 
teenth century by ancestors of his whom po- 
litical troubles caused to emigrate from Italy 
to Switzerland. Here they bought land, and 
in the course of their efforts to settle amicably 
among the people their name was German- 
ized to Landis. About the year 1600 John 
Landis, who had been converted to Protestant- 
ism, was found guilty of heresy by the Inqui- 
sition at Zurich, and, on refusing to recant, 
was beheaded. Thereupon his three sons, 
John, Felix, and Benjamin, came to America. 
They arrived in Pennsylvania, either at the 
same time of William Penn's coming or a 
little before, and bought land in Bucks and 
Lancaster Counties. The descendants of John 
Landis, who settled in Lancaster, number 
among the thousands to-day, and own a large 
part of the county; while the towns of Lan- 
disburg and Landisville perpetuate their name. 

John Landis of a later generation, grand- 
father of Charles K., the subject of this bio- 
graphical notice, who resided in Lancaster, 
Pa., was a merchant, land-owner, and farmer, 
a Free Mason of high rank, a magistrate, and 
a member of the German Lutheran church. 
He married a Miss Kline, whose ancestors 
came from Wiirtemberg, Germany, about the 




CHARLES KLINE LANDIS, Sr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



56s 



same time as did the Landis brothers and 
for a similar reason, being German Protes- 
tants. Their children born of this union 
were: Michael G., John, Israel, Edmund, 
Jesse, Mary, Amelia, Elliza, Matilda, and 
Ann. John, who went to Texas to join the 
rangers, was never heard of afterward, but is 
supposed to have been killed in the battle of 
San Jacinto. Edmund, a physician, went 
with his family to Chicago, where he was 
very successful. Jesse entered the legal pro- 
fession, was City Solicitor of Lancaster for 
some years, and left several sons, all of whom 
are prominent men. Israel had a large out- 
fitting and saddlery store in St. Joseph, Mo., 
in the early days of Western emigration, was 
very prosperous, and left several children. 
With regard to the rest: Mary died in early 
life; Eliza married a Mr. Landis in Califor- 
nia; Matilda married a Mr. Bunting in Cali- 
fornia; Amelia married Thomas Jeffries, of 
Lancaster; and Ann died in middle life. 

Michael G. Landis, the father of Charles 
K. , was a merchant in Lancaster and after- 
ward a railroad contractor in Pennsylvania and 
Georgia. In 1830, July 25, he married Miss 
Mary Lewis Ouinn, of Philadelphia, who was 
born June 14, 1808, daughter of William and 
Mary (White) Ouinn. Mr. Ouinn, who was 
a native of Chester County, Pennsylvania, re- 
moved to Philadelphia, where he was a mer- 
chant. His father was William Ouinn, Sr., 
of Chester County, who, while serving as a 
Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War, died of 
small -pox. Lieutenant Ouinn"s mother be- 
longed to a Quaker family named Coates, who 



were large property holders in Philadelphia. 
His father, who was also an officer, fought in 
both the French and Indian War and the War 
of Independence, and died of wounds received 
in the latter. 

The mother of Mrs. Mary Lewis Ouinn 
Landis was a daughter of Captain or Colonel 
White, of White Marsh, who served in the 
Revolutionary Army, and was wounded in the 
leg at the battle of Brandywine. Colonel 
White had four children — Aaron, Elizabeth, 
Rachel, and Mary. Aaron, when of age, went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, and married. One of his 
daughters became the wife of a Mr Smith, 
who then owned the Cincinnati Gazette ; and 
another daughter married a Mr. Henkel. 
Elizabeth married a Quaker named Isaac Wal- 
ton, who resided on the old York Road lead- 
ing out of Philadelphia. Rachel became the 
wife of Francis Sagee, a ship-builder. Mary, 
the mother of Mrs. Landis, bore her husband 
two sons and five girls. The boys, Charles 
and William Quinn, who wore brought up 
to follow mercantile life, died young. Of 
the girls, Mary, the wife of Michael G. 
Landis, was the eldest. Emily, the youngest, 
married William Baxter, a farmer and land- 
owner of Delaware County, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Landis's grandmother on the mother's 
side was a daughter of a family named Vogdes, 
who lived on a farm in Willis township, 
Chester County, and were land-owners. The 
Whites and the Quinns, who all came to the 
country about the same time that Penn did, 
were Quakers, but fighting Quakers, so many 
of them were soldiers in the Revolution. 



366 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Michael G. Landis and his wife had four 
children; namely, Mary, Charles Kline, 
Beulah, and Matilda Tyson. Mary, who mar- 
ried successively John Davis Bishop and ]5ab- 
bington Russell, died young; Beulah also 
married twice, her first husband having been 
James Whitney, of Philadelphia, and her 
second Dr. Howard Campbell, of that city; 
Matilda Tyson remained a spinster. The 
mother died February 14, 1896, at the home 
of her son, Charles K., in her eighty-eighth 
year. The father died in 1882, at the age of 
seventy-eight years. 

Charles Kline Landis lived with his parents 
for various periods of his early life in Phila- 
delphia, Macon, Ga., Atlanta, Ga., and Lan- 
caster, Pa., and was under the instruction of 
private tutors. At the age of fifteen he began 
to study law in the office of F. Carroll Brews- 
ter, afterward Judge Brewster. Admitted to 
the bar in October, 1852, he immediately 
opened an ofifice in Philadelphia, and entered 
on the practice of his profession. Soon after 
he organized five or six building loan associa- 
tions, all of which were successful, and natu- 
rally gave him charge of their legal business. 
At about the same time he joined what was 
called the Democratic Club of the Third 
Ward, Spring Garden, in Philadelphia, which, 
with needed notoriety, brought him some more 
business. In 1854, becoming interested 
through a client in several extensive real es- 
tate transactions, he discovered that he had 
an aptitude for that line of business, and 
thereafter gave it more attention than his legal 
work. 



Three years later, in company with Richard 
J. Byrnes, using the firm name of Landis & 
Byrnes, he founded the town of Hammonton, 
N.J. This enterprise a paper of Augusta, 
Me., where he had advertised it, denounced 
as a swindle. At once securing a hall in 
Augusta, Mr. Landis had it widely announced 
that on the night of a date named he would 
lecture there on Hammonton. When the 
night came, the hall was packed with people 
eager to hear him. His first words on this 
occasion were an invitation to the author of 
the newspaper criticism to come on the plat- 
form and make good his allegations respecting 
the Hammonton scheme. No one responding, 
he then refuted the charge of swindling, and 
followed with an account of the advantages the 
undertaking offered to settlers. He made so 
favorable an impression that a number of fam- 
ilies went to Hammonton. Plncouraged by 
this result, he afterward lectured in several 
parts of Maine and Massachusetts, and found 
that doing so was a most successful method of 
obtaining settlers. 

His experience with Hammonton made ob- 
vious to him what he could accomplish on a 
larger scale, and he conceived the idea of 
starting a settlement near the great seaboard 
markets of America. This was, in his own 
words, "to afford the widest and most certain 
scope for individual success, alike on account 
of the markets and of the opportunities for 
skilled labor in farming, gardening, and me- 
chanics." Having decided for himself that 
the project was feasible, he resolved to carry 
it into effect untrammelled by a partner. In 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



367 



1 86 1, being then but twenty-eight years old, 
he selected a tract of land containing about 
forty-eight square miles, situated in the wild- 
est part of New Jersey, on the line of a new 
railroad that was then doing a very little busi- 
ness. He obtained possession of twenty-two 
thousand acres of this land by purchase from 
Richard D. Wood, of Philadelphia. The rest 
he bought from other parties, making in all 
about thirty-two thousand acres. 

"It was in the centre of this place, upon a 
mile square of land," to quote his own words 
again, "that I proposed to build a city, which 
would be filled with manufactories, shops and 
stores for mercantile purposes, schools and 
halls for public recreation, and private resi- 
dences, and surround this mile square of city, 
as far as the boundaries of the land would 
reach, with farms, gardens, orchards, and vine- 
yards." So unpromising was the site, and so 
great were the obvious difficulties in the way, 
that some people seemed justified in character- 
izing the plan as the dream of a lunatic. 
Nevertheless, on August 8, 1861, in the high- 
est part of the centre of the tract, Mr. Landis 
himself cut down the first tree by way of start- 
ing the construction of an avenue ten and a 
half miles long and one hundred feet wide, 
that was soon after completed by a large force 
of workmen. He continued the work until 
at his own expense he had made two hundred 
and twenty miles of roads and twenty miles of 
ditches, besides building a railroad that con- 
nected his settlement directly with New York. 

By 1875 his dream was so far realized he 
was able to state in Frascrs (London) Maga- 



zine "that the settlement had twenty fine 
school-houses, ten churches, fifteen manufact- 
uring establishments, and four post-ofifices," 
and continued to say: "Out of seventy-seven 
townships in that State, by the census of 
1S69, Landis township (the entire settlement) 
ranked the fourth in the value of its agricult- 
ural productions. There are seventeen miles 
of railway upon the tract, embracing six rail- 
way stations. There is more fruit raised in 
Vineland than anywhere else in the United 
States upon the same amount of land. To 
drive through the place over the smooth and 
beautiful roads, lined with shade trees and 
bordered with green, and past her thousands 
of orchards and vineyards, is like driving 
through the loveliest of parks. . . . Her citi- 
zens are gathered together from the Far West, 
from the Middle and New England States, 
from Germany, France, England, Ireland, 
and Scotland, even from sunny Italy." It 
does not come within the scope of this sketch 
to describe Vineland as it is to-day; but it 
may be mentioned that the Italian colony, 
started in the township by Mr. Landis in 
1870, now occupies five thousand acres, and is 
composed of sober, industrious farmers, well 
skilled in the various branches of agriculture 
followed in this country as well as in Italy. 

Sea Isle City, Cape May County, was also 
founded by Mr. Landis. His attention was 
first drawn to Ludlam Island in 1879; and on 
inquiry into the matter he found that the 
island was owned in undivided interests by 
two families named Ludlam and Smith, num- 
bering about five hundred persons, scattered 



368 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



all over the country. This was discouraging; 
but on considering that, if it had been easy to 
buy the property, somebody else would have 
had it before then, he decided to make the at- 
tempt to get it. Employing five or six agents, 
he succeeded in purchasing the entire title 
within two years. He then organized the Sea 
Isle City Improvement Comjjany, and held the 
first sale at the offices of Thomas & Sons, 
Philadelphia, on May 2, 1881. The first rail- 
road connecting the island with the mainland 
was built in the following year. The place 
has now two railroads, and about three hun- 
dred buildings, with excellent prospects of 
future development. 

In 1874 Mr. Landis travelled for about ten 
months in Europe, visiting England, Ireland, 
Scotland, France, and Germany, mainly in the 
interests of Vineland. He went again to 
Europe in 1889, staying nine months, during 
which he made a study of the sea defences of 
Holland, and subsequently visited Germany, 
Italy, Sicily, Greece, and Egypt. He still 
owns or controls about five thousand acres of 
the Vineland tract, and about six hundred lots 
in Vineland. 

In 1868, October 14, he married Clara F. 
Meade, daughter of Captain Richard W. 
Meade, and niece of General George G. Meade. 
They had four children, as follows: Henry 
Meigs Landis, who died in infancy; Charles 
K. Landis, Jr., counsellor-at-law, who mar- 
ried Mary Rosenbaum, daughter of Robert A. 
Rosenbaum and grand-daughter of the former 
proprietor of Malaga, N.J. ; Richard Worsen 
Meade Landis, who is engaged in studying 



art; and James Montevert Landis, who is pur- 
suing a course in scientific and mechanical 
electricity. 

Mr. Charles R. Landis, Sr. , is a member of 
the Episcopal church. Before the Civil War 
he was a Democrat. Since then he has been 
a Republican. He is a member of Vineland 
Lodge, No. 69, A. F. & A. M., and of Eureka 
Chapter. When a young man in Philadel- 
phia, he belonged to the Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Although New Jersey is strewn with 
the beneficial results of his enterprises, and 
the world at large is indebted to him for some 
most useful ideas, Mr. Landis has always de- 
clined to be regarded as a philanthropist. He 
claims that in all his undertakings he has had 
no other motive than self-interest, which, he 
has always held, is best served by serving the 
best interests of others. The persons come 
rarely who put this utilitarian principle into 
practice as consistently as Mr. Landis has 
done. 




HEPPARD s. McAllister, of 

Millville, N.J., a dealer in house 
furnishings and fancy goods, was 
born at Jericho, Stoe Creek, Cumberland 
County, on November 5, 1865. He is a son 
of James B. McAllister, and is of Scottish de- 
scent. His grandfather, Joseph McAllister, 
followed in early manhood the occupation of 
farming at Lower Alloway Creek, later be- 
coming a carpenter of Salem, N.J. 

James B. McAllister, son of Joseph, was 
born at Lower Alloway Creek on November 2, 
1836, and had his home there for some years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



369 



Removing at length to Stoe Creek, he occu- 
pied himself with general farming; but in 
1867 he changed his residence to Bridgeton, 
and engaged in business until he became the 
victim of small-pox. The expense which he 
was compelled to incur in tiiat and in his suc- 
ceeding sickness, together with the state of his 
health, induced him to leave the city for the 
countr)'; and he removed on to a farm near 
Canton, and thence a little later to Ouinton, 
Salem County, where he established a shoe- 
repairing shop, in which business he is still 
engaged. He was united in marriage with 
Miss Elizabeth Shimp, of Lower Alloway 
Creek, Salem County, N.J., she being the 
daughter of Mr. Sheppard Shimp, one of the 
early farmers of that county. Mr. and Mrs. 
James B. McAllister had a family of five chil- 
dren, two of them attaining to maturity, 
namely: Mary, who is now the wife of Mr. 
Benjamin Stevenson, of Woodstown, N.J.; 
and Sheppard S. Mrs. Elizabeth S. McAllis- 
ter departed this life on October 27, 1895, in 
her fifty-fourth year. She was a member of 
the Baptist Church of Ouinton, to which her 
husband still belongs. 

Sheppard S. McAllister, the direct subject 
of this biography, attended the district school 
near Quinton until he was twelve years of age, 
and after that for a year and a half was a 
pupil in a school in Ouinton. He then be- 
came a clerk in a general store in Quinton, 
where he remained nine years, during which 
time he attended a collegiate institute for 
three months. Thence moving to Salem, he 
was employed in a grocery store for ten 



months, after which he entered into partner- 
ship with a Mr. Robinson, under the firm 
name of Robinson & McAllister, they becom- 
ing proprietors of a wall-paper and carpet 
store. Seventeen months later, disposing of 
his share of the stock and trade to Mr. Robin- 
son, he moved, on August i, uSgo, to Mill- 
ville, to establish a grocery business, locating 
at Second and Broad Streets. After success- 
fully managing that for ten months, he sold 
out to Mr. James L. Smith, with whom he 
continued as an employee a year and seven 
months, when, on February 4, 1893, he estab- 
lished himself in his present house-furnishing 
and variety store. This new trade he started 
in a small way, and has gradually increased 
till to-day he carries a very large quantity, as 
well as a fine quality, of goods, with every 
nook and corner well occupied, from the top to 
the bottom of his spacious store, which has a 
frontage of thirty-nine feet and a depth of 
forty-eight, and enjoying the reputation of 
carrying the largest stock of toys, together 
with general furnishing articles, of any dealer 
in the county. He is the leading man of his 
town to-day in his particular line of trade. 
Mr. McAllister also owns a fine double house 
in Millville, both tenements of which he 
rents. 

On October 3, 18S8, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Anna L. Erhardt, of Salem, 
N.J. Mrs. McAllister is a daughter of Paul 
Erhardt, a gunsmith of Salem, who was born 
in Tubingen, Wiirtemberg, Germany, in 1829. 
His father was born at the same place in 
1802, and was a locksmith. He died a few 



37° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



years ago. Paul Erhardt emigrated to this 
country in 1849, and in 1853 went to Salem, 
N.J., where in 1857 he started his present 
gun, ammunition, and locksmith business. 
He has been twice married, and has had six 
children, all of whom reached maturity. His 
present wife, Mary Stimer Erhardt, was born 
in Unterentfelden, Canton Argan, Switzer- 
land. Her father was from the same place, a 
blacksmith by trade, born in 1810. Her 
mother was born in 1S15, and is still living, 
residing with her son in Salem, N.J. Mr. 
and Mrs. McAllister have had three children; 
namely, Paul J., Helen, and Anna E. Mr. 
McAllister is a member of the North Baptist 
Church of Millville, of which he is a Trustee, 
and in the Sunday-school connected with 
which he is an honored teacher. He is a self- 
made man, very industrious and progressive, 
and is in the enjoyment of a well-deserved 
success. 

HOMAS H. VINTER, one of the 
founders of the First National Bank of 
Vineland, N.J., was born near Boston, Lin- 
colnshire, England, May g, 1S41, son of 
Thomas and Ann (I^aw) Vinter. His father, 
who was a farmer, came to the United States 
when Thomas M. was ten years of age, and 
started for the West. Stopping in Rochester, 
N.Y., he died there, leaving his little son 
alone in a strange country. The mother had 
remained in her native land, waiting until her 
husband should establish a home in America. 
Five or six years after the decease of his 
father, his mother married again, and came to 




this country, living in Buffalo, N.Y., where 
she died about the time of the Civil War in 
this country, leaving two daughters there — 
Charlotte V., now the wife of Peter Germain, 
of Snyder, Erie County, N.Y. , a suburb of 
Buffalo; and Mary V., wife of John Tripp, of 
Vineland, N.J. 

Thomas H. Vinter, after the death of his 
father, found a home with Oliver H. Day, 
who, when the boy had been with him about 
a year, moved to Suspension Bridge, N.Y. 
There the lad grew to manhood, working on 
Mr. Day's farm, and attending school with 
comparative regularity three months each 
winter. He intended to stay with Mr. Day 
until he should attain his majority; but the 
war broke out before he was of age, and, 
choosing Mr. Day his legal guardian, he ob- 
tained his consent, and enlisted in 1861 in 
Company F, Tenth New York Cavalry. His 
company was recruited at Niagara Falls, and 
joined the body of the regiment at Elmira, 
N.Y. , whence they started for Gettysburg, and 
moved on to Richmond with the Army of the 
Potomac. The young soldier took part in all 
the engagements of the First Brigade, Second 
Division, Cavalry Corps, up to the time of the 
end of their term of service, which covered 
two and a half years, being then discharged by 
reason of re-enlistment with his regiment as 
veteran for another three years, or during the 
war. His regiment was then given thirty 
days' furlough, and served until August, 
1865. At that time many of the beardless 
youths who had enlisted with no knowledge 
of military science, their only qualifications 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIF.W 



371 



being courage and an unflinching purpose, 
were looked upon as veterans, and were 
greeted with the plaudits of the nation as they 
assembled under the banners of peace. At 
the Grand Review in Washington the cavalry, 
to which Mr. \'inter belonged, headed the line 
of march, and were almost buried beneath the 
flowers showered upon them. The gallant 
soldiers bore away all they could carry, and 
the broad sweep of Pennsylvania Avenue was 
covered as by a carpet. Mr. Vinter passed 
through the war unscathed, suffering neither 
wound nor sickness, and remained a private by 
choice. 

When the army was disbanded he returned 
to his Niagara home and entered Eastman's 
Business College at Poughkeepsie. His 
course of study finished, he went to St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., then the terminus of all railroads 
West, and shortly after went up the Missouri 
River to Omaha. Arriving in that city, he 
bought a wagon and mules to travel across the 
plains, and induced an old comrade of his reg- 
iment, whom he met, to go with him. This 
was at the time of the Indian troubles, and 
most of the stage stations were burned. The 
two men travelling without escort ran great 
risk, but they reached Denver in safety. 
Tiiis beautiful city was at that time in em- 
bryo, and three thousand dollars vvould prob- 
ably have purcliased all the improvements 
there. Camping near Denver, the comrades 
spent a week hunting and fishing, and then 
moved on to Salt Lake City, taking the route 
through the Black Hills. They arrived at 
their destination in 1866, ant! heard Brigham 



Young preach on trade and other practical 
topics in connection, with dealing with the 
Gentiles. His hall was a brush house, the 
Tabernacle and other large public buildings 
of Salt Lake City being things of the future. 

Mr. \'inter intended to go to San Francisco; 
but, his companion desiring to go to Montana, 
they decided by lot, and turned to Virginia 
City, then the capital of Montana. In Mon- 
tana Mr. Vinter worked in the mines and at 
farm labor until the spring of 1867, when he 
obtained a position as clerk for B. D. Max- 
ham, a business man of Virginia City, who 
kept a large general store. A year later he 
became Mr. Ma.xham's partner; and soon the 
scope of their business was enlarged, the firm 
investing in municipal securities, at the same 
time wholesaling and retailing merchandise. 
The firm of Ma.xham & \'inter conducted a 
successful business in Montana for ten years, 
the last five of which Mr. Vinter was in per- 
sonal charge, Mr. Ma.xham having returned to 
the East and made his home in Vineland, 
N.J. At the end of that period they disposed 
of the general store, but still continued to 
deal in Western securities. 

Mr. Vinter visited Mr. Ma.xham's home in 
Vineland, arriving December 25, 1876, and it 
was his intention to return again to the West, 
after transacting certain business incident to 
the dissolution of their partnership; but, 
while stopping for a while visiting friends in 
Pennsylvania, he met his fate in the shape of 
a charming young lady, whom he married. 
The summer following his rjiarriage he trav- 
elled through the White Mountains and 



572 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



visited Saratoga, Martha's Vineyard, and other 
Eastern summer resorts. He then located in 
Vineland, and with Mr. Ma.xham started the 
First National Bank, Mr. Vinter being Cash- 
ier. The partners furnished most of the capi- 
tal, and had charge of the bank the first year. 
Since then Mr. Vinter has dealt largely in 
Western municipal securities. As a business 
man his judgment is considered unquestionable, 
and as a member of society he is very popular. 
July 27, 1877, he was married to Miss 
Emma D. Simpson, of Indiana, Pa., daughter 
of S. L. Simpson. She died August 5, 1883, 
eight days after the birth of a daughter, who 
was named Emma, in memory of her mother; 
and in 1887 Mr. Vinter was married to Miss 
Ella A. Packard, a native of Barnard, Vt. 
Mr. Vinter and his wife are members of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Vineland, of 
which he is a Trustee; and he was Treasurer 
of the society for seven years. He has a 
pleasant home at 929 Landis Avenue, where 
he has resided since 1878. 



■rf^ICHARU LOTT, a prominent busi- 
I ^Y ness man in Bridgeton, where he has 
V.-"^ been for a number of years engaged 
in general milling, was born on the 20th of 
F'cbruary, 1861. His father, also Richard by 
name, was a native of Salem County, New 
Jersey, born in Pitt's Grove on December 31, 
18 1 8. He was distinctively a self-made man, 
having had only the meagre advantages of the 
district schools as a child. At the age of nine 
years, upon the death of his father, he went to 



make his home with Ezekiel Rose, who owned 
the Rose Flour Mills, located at what is now 
known as Seeley, N.J. At the age of ten 
years he was placed in these mills to learn 
the trade of flour milling. He remained with 
Mr. Rose when that gentleman bought the 
Woodstown P'lour Mills, continuing in his 
employ until becoming of age. 

There is something as admirable as it is 
pathetic in the history of youth expended in 
breadwinning. The law of compensation is 
often more clearly manifested in such cases 
than elsewhere. What is lost of happy child- 
life and freedom is in later years made up to 
the youthful laborer by self-reliance, experi- 
ence, and strength. Soon after attaining his 
majority, Mr. Lott left the mills at Woodstown 
to seek his fortune in the then P'ar West; but, 
finding business very dull in milling, he was 
forced to look for employment in other fields, 
being successful in securing a position in a 
millstone factory in Cincinnati, Ohio. He 
subsequently migrated to Davenport, la., and 
worked at his trade in a flour-mill at Rocking- 
ham, about three miles below Davenport. 
Remaining in Rockingham about a year, he 
again returned to Woodstown, N.J., where he 
found employment at the old mill. 

In 1848 he was married to Ellen M. Bolton, 
the youngest daughter of Joseph 15olton, of 
Woodstown. Soon after their marriage he 
went to Glassboro, where he took charge of 
the Whitney Flour Mills. In 1850 he came 
to Bridgeton, N.J., and rented the mill prop- 
erty of Jonathan Elmer, known as Elmer's 
mills. In this undertaking he formed a part- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



373 



nership with Barzilla Smith. This connec- 
tion lasted for three years, when Mr. Lett 
bought his partner's interest; and until 1859 
he conducted the business alone. In the year 
1859 hs bought from the Stratton estate what 
is known as the Bridgeton Roller Flour Mills, 
and continued to do a general milling busi- 
ness there. In 1872 he took his son, L. Bol- 
ton Lott, into partnership with him, but in 
1880 again became sole proprietor. In 1S89 
was formed a new partnership, his youngest 
son, Richard Lott, and John T. Cornwell, be- 
coming members of the firm. This partner- 
ship was dissolved only by the death of the 
fatiier and senior member, which occurred in 
April, 1891. 

Mr. Lott was undoubtedly a man of strong 
characteristics with shrewd business tact, and 
possessed the gift of influencing those about 
him. Despite the fact of his scanty early 
educational opportunities, he occupied a 
high position in the community in which he 
lived. For many years he was a member of 
the Bridgeton Board of Education, and was 
Treasurer of the Board of Trade in that city. 
He was a member of Evening Star Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M. His acumen in financial 
matters was universally relied upon, and from 
1865 until his death he was a Director of the 
Cumberland National Bank. Of Mr. Lott's 
five children four are now living: Emma L., 
widow of Eon Robiquet Denis, of Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; L. Bolton Lott, of Bridgeton; 
William C. Lott, a physician of Philadelphia; 
and Richard Lott, whose name appears at the 
head of this sketch. 



Richard Lott, the last named, enjoyed the 
educational advantages that had been in so 
large a measure denied his father, the educa- 
tion he acquired in Bridgeton's public schools 
being supplemented by four years of instruc- 
tion and study in the South Jersey Institute. 
After leaving school he went into his father's 
mill as an apprentice. Having become some- 
what familiar with the working of the intri- 
cate milling machinery, he deemed it wise to 
further prepare himself for a business career 
by entering Bryant & Stratton's Commercial 
College in Philadelphia and taking a thorough 
course, embracing all the practical details of 
a business education. Upon returning to 
Bridgeton, 1880, he again entered the mill 
under the tutorshijj of his father, and contin- 
ued to work for him until the partnership was 
formed in 1889, as above mentioned, consist- 
ing of the elder Richard Lott, Richard Lott, 
the younger, and John T. Cornwell. At the 
death of Richard Lott, the father, in 1891, 
the subject of this sketch bought his interest, 
forming a partnership with John T. Cornwell, 
which continued until November, 1895. 
Richard Lott then bought Mr. CornwelPs in- 
terest, thereby becoming sole owner and pro- 
prietor of the Bridgeton Roller Flour Mills. 

Mr. Lott was married on P'ebruary 12, 1889, 
to Clara Wilson Jackson, daughter of Mr. 
Henry Jackson, of Brooklyn, N.Y. They 
have two children — Edith Jackson Lott and 
Alice Marie Lott. Mr. Lott is a Mason, be- 
longing to Brcarly Lodge, A. ¥. & A. M., of 
Bridgeton, N.J. In religious affiliation he is 
a Baptist. 



374 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



B 



AVID ROBBINS LAKE, a retired 
merchant and a fruit grower of Port 
Norris, was born in the village in 
which he now lives on the 31st of December, 
1 8 59. His parents were Samuel and Mary 
(Robbins) Lake, the former of whom was also 
a native of Port Norris, where he was born on 
September 3, 1826, and where he grew up. 

Samuel Lake must have possessed the force 
of authority as a sort of inherent faculty; for 
he was the captain of an oyster vessel when 
he was not more than fifteen or sixteen years 
old, beginning his career as a boatman before 
that time even. He was recognized as the 
most youthful commander in the service in 
that part of the country, and at an imusually 
early age became an oyster dealer. This was 
before oyster planting had become a regular 
industry, and the young man hail but little 
comjjctition to encounter. In a compara- 
tively short time he was the owner of three 
schooners and one sloop, all devoted to the 
oyster industry; and he eventually became 
the largest dealer in that most popular spe- 
cies of shell-fish in his generation and local- 
ity. He continued in this business until five 
or six years before his death, giving his per- 
sonal attention to the enterprise, frequently 
visiting his boats and looking after his men. 
He always lived in Port Norris with the 
exception of three years passed in Hridgeton, 
wiiile his children were at school. 

Mr. -Samuel Lake was first a Whig in [joli- 
tics and later on a Re]Hiblican. Hesides his 
oyster beds he owned cpiite a large amount of 
land in the vicinity of Port Norris, and was a 



man of wealth. He married Miss Mary Rob- 
bins, a daughter of Mr. David Robbins, a 
large farmer in this locality, whose name has 
descended to the subject of the present sketch, 
his grandson. Mrs. Lake, who was born in 
February, 1833, was the mother of four chil- 
dren, three of whom grew up to maturity: 
Daniel, who lived to the age of seventeen; 
Myra, who is now the wife of Theophilus 
Newcomb, a resident of Newport; David Rob- 
bins; Robert L. , of whom further notice will 
be found in another sketch in this volume. 
The parents have departed this life. 

These good old people were at first members 
of the Baptist Church at Dividing Creek; 
but, when the Baptist church was established 
in the old school-house at Robbinstown, they 
were among its primary organizers. Mr. Sam- 
uel Lake was an earnest and active supporter 
of the Baptist denomination in this locality; 
and it was greatly due to his efforts that the 
church structure, now occupied by the congre- 
gation to which he belongs, was built. .Such 
was his interest in the success of the deserv- 
ing attempt to establish a church here that he 
circulated the subscription papers in and aiiout 
Bridgcton, and received donations amounting 
to one thousand dollars, which was a great 
help, coming as it did from outside generos- 
ity. It was, however, hardly generosity so 
much as recognition, as he had for years, while 
he was in the oyster business, furnished the 
Bridgeton church fairs with his oysters free of 
charge; and now the grateful congregations 
returned his kindness with their hearty sup- 
port, financial as well as otherwise, for his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



375 



new church. Mr. Samuel Lake was at the 
time of his deatli one of the most highly re- 
spected and honored citizens of the place, 
not only because of his wisely and justly 
accumulated wealth, but also for his sterling 
integrity and general earnestness of character. 
David Robbins Lake, son of Samuel, re- 
ceived his early education in the common 
schools of Port Norris. Then he went with 
his parents to Bridgcton and attended the high 
school, thus completing his school education. 
After leaving the high school he went into 
the oyster industry with his father. With the 
sturdiness and pertinacity of character that 
early developed themselves in this young man, 
he started at the very bottom of the ladder to 
learn the business, in order to get a thorough 
hold of it. He continued in the oyster busi- 
ness with his father until 1883, when, at the 
age of twenty-four, he married Miss Abigail 
Hand. About that time he built a store on 
the corner of Market and Main Streets in the 
town of Port Norris. Here he intended to do 
business personally; but, owing to the poor 
health of his wife, he took her to Colorado, 
and they spent the winter in the vicinity of 
Denver and at Pueblo. They returned here in 
the spring of 1886, when she died, leaving no 
children. Mr. Lake sold out his store in Port 
Norris, and during the three years of his 
widowerhood was engaged in the oyster busi- 
ness again. After this period he returned to 
his old interest in the grocery trade, and went 
into his old store, where he continued success- 
fully engaged for over four years. In Decem- 
ber, 1S94, he sold out his interests in his 



grocery business, as the indoor life did not 
agree with his health. Being the owner of a 
very good tract of land amounting to about 
seventy acres, in and adjoining the town, he 
decided to cultivate a part of it especially for 
fruit-growing purposes; and he accordingly 
set out a large number of peach-trees and 
plum-trees, and devoted quite an acreage to 
the culture of blackberries and strawberries. 
Although very much taken up with this culti- 
vation of fruit, which he carried on so well, 
he still retained an interest in the work of 
raising and selling oysters for the city 
markets, a part of which business he conducts 
for his father-in-law, Aaron Campbell, of Port 
Norris. In fact, the oyster business in the 
season takes up the most of his time. 

In June, 1889, Mr. Lake married for his 
second wife Miss Carrie Campbell, the daugh- 
ter of Aaron Campbell. I\Irs. Lake was born 
in Newport, where she lived until her father 
removed to Port Norris. Mr. Campbell is an 
e.xtensive oyster dealer here. He came from 
one of the most prominent families in tlie 
vicinity. Mr. and Mrs. Lake have two little 
daughters — Mary H. and Myrta. 

A sturdy Republican voter and more or 
less interested in politics, Mr. Lake has never 
been an active worker in the party ranks. He 
is a member of the Knights of Pythias and of 
the Red Men, but spends more of his time at 
home than at the lodge. He and his family 
occupy the house which he built on the corner 
of Main and Market Streets, opposite the site 
of his old store. It is of very pleasing archi- 
tectural design, is supplied with running 



376 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



water and all modern conveniences, and situ- 
ated in the midst of a well-kept lawn, all to- 
sether one of the finest residences in Port 
Norris. 



^OHN SAUL DOWN, a contractor and 
builder of Vineland, N.J., was born in 
Franklin, Gloucester County, N.J., 
April 9, 1832, his parents being Thomas C. 
and Mary (Saul) Down. The father of 
Thomas C. Down was Samuel Down, who was 
born, as the youngest son of his parents, May 
4, 1769, and who followed the occupation of 
farming. He was joined in matrimony with 
Miss Rebecca Clark, whose birth was on Feb- 
ruary 21, 1770; and to them were born six 
children, two sons and four daughters. Sam- 
uel Down passed away from earth April 7, 
1826. 

Thomas C. Down was a native of Franklin, 
where his birth occurred on November 11, 
1812. He received his education in the com- 
mon schools, and passed his days as a farmer 
on the old homestead. He was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary Saul, the daughter 
of James Saul, of Franklin, and they became 
the hajjpy parents of eight children, si.\ of 
whom lived to maturity, namely: John Saul; 
]5enjamin; Martha, who is now the wife of 
Frederick Hinckley; Leonard; Susanna, the 
wife of Zephaniah Dare, of Vineland; and 
Rebecca, now Mrs. Harry Ilembley, whore- 
sides in l'hiladcl|ihia, I'a. Thomas C. Down 
served his town in several important capaci- 
ties; and he was identified with the social life 
of his native place, being a member of the 



Malaga Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He died at his old home in June, 
1887, his wife, Mrs. Mary S. Down, surviving 
him a little over five years, passing away July 
17, 1892, in her eighty-second year. Both 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

John Saul Down, the direct subject of this 
sketch, received his education in the common 
schools of Gloucester County, New Jersey, 
and remained at home on the farm until he at- 
tained his majority. He then learned the 
carpenter's trade, and worked as a journeyman 
for about two years. Removing then to W'ill- 
iamstown, N.J., he for two years acted as the 
foreman carpenter for the Bodine Brothers; 
and in 1865 he went to Millville, N.J., where 
he was employed for five years as foreman for 
E. & J. L. Wilson, contractors and builders. 
After their business was sold to D. A. Newtoir 
& Co., Mr. Down remained with the latter 
firm for two years in the same capacity. 
From Millville he removed to Malaga, N.J., 
and took charge of the Malaga Window Glass 
Works, remaining there four years. He then 
changed his residence to Atlantic City for the 
benefit of his family's health, and was in busi- 
ness there as a contractor and builder for five 
years. In 1888 he came to X'ineland, where 
he has been engaged ever since in the same 
pursuit. He has constructed many glass 
houses in the vicinity, among which may be 
named one at Malaga, two at Millville, and 
three in X'ineland; and in the last-named 
place he has also built a large number of fine 
residences. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



377 



On January 30, 1S5S, he was married to 
Miss Mary Ann Lashley, the daughter of 
Philip Lashley, of Franklin, N.J. Into their 
home have come two children, namely: Mil- 
lard A., who died March 12, 18S6, at the age 
of twenty-seven; and Harry, who was born 
June 5, 1865. ]\Ir. Down has been promi- 
nently before the public, and his citizenship 
has been put to the proof by his election to 
several important local offices. When he was 
a resident of Atlantic City he served in the 
City Council from 1S86 to 1888. In 1891 he 
was elected a member of the \'incland Borough 
Council for a term of three years; and he has 
served on the Finance Committee, has offici- 
ated as Chairman of the City Committee, and 
also in the same capacity on the Printing 
Committee, and is now serving as a chosen 
Freeholder of Cumberland County. He is 
well and favorably known in the social circles 
of his community, and is identified with the 
fraternity of Odd Fellows, being a member of 
the Millville Lodge, No. 47. In religious 
belief both he and his wife, Mrs. Down, are 
Methodists, being members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Vineland, of which he 
has been steward. 



iW^E 



OEN ERRICKSON, Jk., the success- 
VtlJ- ful proprietor of a general merchan- 
dise store in Heislerville, Cumberland County, 
N.J., a son of Goen and Alcena (Corson) 
Errickson, was born in Lcesburg, this county, 
on November 25, 1824. 

Goen Errickson, son of Samuel and Rachel 



(Corson) Errickson, was born in Heislerville 
in 1 78 1, and received his education in the 
common .schools. He served his country in 
the War of 18 12, being stationed at Staten 
Island. He was engaged in various lines of 
commercial entcri)rise until his death in 1845, 
at the age of sixty-four. He married Alcena, 
a daughter of John Corson, of Delmont, N.J., 
and they were the parents of nine children, 
namely: Deborah, wife of Jeremiah Weiser, 
of Port Elizabeth; Matilda, who married 
Washington Brown, of Camden; Elizabeth, 
who married Edward Lee; Samuel, a resident 
of Massena, la.; Margaret, now Mrs. William 
Shepard, of Port Elizabeth; Rachel, wife of 
Edward Grassman, of Port Elizabeth, N.J. ■; 
Goen, Jr.; Anna, who became Mrs. Thomas 
Mason; and Isaiah (deceased). 

Goen Errickson, Jr., after receiving a com- 
mon-school education, began a seafaring life 
while he was yet a young boy; and he con- 
tinued to brave the dangers of the ocean until 
1876. At the age of twenty-one he was pro- 
moted to the position of mate; and in 1864 he 
became captain of a coasting-vessel sailing to 
points between Virginia and Philadelphia, 
New Haven, New York, and Albany, proving 
himself to be an able mariner. During the 
centennial year he started the store which 
now (1896) engages his attention and yields 
e.xcellent financial results. Politically, Mr. 
Errickson has always affiliated with the Dem- 
ocratic party, but he has refused to be a can- 
didate for office. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of Maurice River Lodge, No. 17, Knights 
of Pythias. 



37S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On June 4, 1849, Mr. Errickson was united 
in marriage to Miss Elizabeth R., daughter of 
John Hollingshead, of Leesburg, N.J. Two 
children, daughters, Catherine and Alcena, 
are the fruit of this union. Catherine Errick- 
son married Isaac Co.\, and died leaving 
three children — Adelia, Julia, and Anna. 
Alcena Errickson, who married Leman Whil- 
den, has one child, Edward H. Mr. and Mrs. 
Errickson give their religious influence and 
material aid to the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which Mrs. Errickson is an efficient 
member. 




^ANFORD BACON, a retired ship- 
master and a general merchant of 
Dividing Creek, and of whom a por- 
trait is herewith presented, was born here, 
February 13, 1854, son of Theophilus and 
Hannah (Burt) Bacon. Mr. Bacon's grand- 
father, Charles ]?acon, who was a native of 
Massachusetts and a carpenter by trade, 
passed the greater part of his life in Maurice- 
town, N.J. Here he was a well-known 
builder in his day, and he ditl the carpenter 
work upon the covered bridge at Dividing 
Creek. 

Theophilus Bacon, Mr. Bacon's father, was 
born in Mauricetown, February 19, 1822. 
Having acquired such an education as the 
schools of his day afforded, he learned the car- 
penter's trade with his father. At the age of 
twenty-one he settled in Dividing Creek, 
where he became a contractor and builder, and 
erected many of the best buildings in the 
place, including the Methoiiist church and 



several of the prominent residences. He was 
highly respected, occupied a leading position 
in both society and business circles, and was 
connected with Ariel Lodge, Independent 
Order of Odd F"ellows, of Mauricetown. In 
public affairs he was actively interested; and 
he had served with ability as Township Clerk 
for several years when his death occurred, on 
September 13, 1S61. His wife, Hannah, 
whom he married December 3, 1845, was born 
in Dividing Creek, November 15, 1829, 
daughter of Noah Burt, a former well-known 
resident of this township. She became the 
mother of five children, of whom Alonzo T., 
Anna, Lucy, and Sanford are living. Anna 
is the wife of John C. Hand, of Port Norris. 
The mother is still living, and is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Sanford Bacon attended the public schools 
of this town until he was sixteen. For the 
succeeding two years he was employed as a 
farm assistant. He then shipped before the 
mast on board of a coasting-vessel. In i88i 
he became part owner and the master of the 
three-masted schooner "Addie B. Bacon." 
He was engaged in the coasting trade, princi- 
pally between Philadelphia and Charleston, 
S.C., carrying coal, lumber, anil phosphate. 
In the notable gale of 1888 his vessel was 
driven ashore at the Delaware breakwater, the 
only serious mishap he ever iiad. In 1892 he 
retired from the sea, and, settling in his na- 
tive town, bought his present general store, 
in which he makes a specialty of ship sup- 
plies. He also furnishes regularly about 
twenty oyster boats with provisions. 



r 




■55i<»- \ 



1? 




SANFORD BACON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



381 



On August 20, 1 88 1, Mr. Bacon was united 
in marriage to Almeda Pepper, daughter of 
Captain William H. and Emclinc (Studhams) 
Pepper, of Dividing Creek. Mrs. Bacon is 
the mother of two children, namely: Alma, 
born June 15, 1S82; and Lillian P., born 
March 8, 1892. Mr. Bacon is connected with 
Social Lodge, N.o. 168, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Good Litent ]-?eneficial So- 
ciety. In politics he takes no active interest 
beyond casting his vote for whom he thinks 
the best men. Mrs. Bacon is a member of the 
Baptist church, while he contributes liber- 
ally to both that and the Methodist church. 
Mr. Bacon has the sincere esteem and good 
will of his townsmen. 



■^gjmTNEZER PADGETT, the owner of a 
Jpl fine farm situated about a quarter of 
a mile from the Deerfield Street post-office, 
is one of the most enterprising stock raisers 
and dairymen of this town. He was born in 
the northern jjart of the town of Deerfield, 
July 31, 1852, son of Aaron and Sarah 
(Spence) Padgett and grandson of Aaron 
Padgett, Sr. The first representative of the 
family in this country came from lingland. 

Aaron Padgett, the father, was born in 
Hopewell in 1809, and grew to manhood in 
that town. On starting out in life for him- 
self he engaged in the stage business, conduct- 
ing two lines, one from Cape May to Bridge- 
ton and the other from Greenwich to Phila- 
delphia by way of Alloway. On the latter 
route one day was occupied in going to Phil- 



adelphia and the following day for the return 
trip. He carried passengers, express, and 
mail. The coaches were drawn by four 
horses, and every ten or twelve miles the 
horses were changed; and in this way the 
journey was accomplished with ease and speed. 
Mr. Padgett conducted the Philadelphia line 
for si.x years and the Cape May line for three 
years. On selling the last named, he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres in this towai, but subsequently sold it, 
and removed to S.toe Creek township. Later 
on he returned to Deerfield, and resided here 
until his death, which occurred in October, 
1887. His wife, whose name before marriage 
was Sarah Spence, was a daughter of John 
Spence, of Bricksboro, in which place she was 
born and grew to womanhood. Her father 
was extensively engaged in the shipping of 
wood to Philadelphia by boat. She died De- 
cember 5, 1890, leaving seven children — 
Cordelia, Edwin, David, John, Harrison, 
Ebenezer, and Eliza J. Cordelia became the 
wife of Jacob Richer, and is now a widow, re- 
siding with her brother, the subject of this 
sketch. Edwin served in the Civil War as a 
member of Company K, Twelfth New Jersey 
Volunteers (an account of this regiment may 
be found in the sketch of F. M. Riley), and 
died after his return from the war. David 
married Harriet Hitchner, and resides at Back 
Neck, N.J. He has three children — Anna 
H., A. Walter, and Howard B. John resides 
in Bridgeton. He married Anna M. Sharp, 
and has one child, Leander S. Harrison died 
when six years old. tlliza J. is unmarried. 



382 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



The parents were members of the Presby- 
terian Church of Deerfield, the father being 
an Elder therein. He was a Republican in 
politics. 

Ebenezer Padgett received a practical com- 
mon-school education, and continued to reside 
on the farm with his parents until his father's 
death. He then engaged in farming for him- 
self, and carried on a farm in the northern 
part of the town for five years, one in Jericho 
a year, and two in this town, before coming 
to his present place, which he rented for six 
years prior to 1895, when he purchased it. 
It contains one hundred and twenty-five acres 
of well-improved land, and is pleasantly and 
conveniently situated, being but a short dis- 
tance from the village. On the farm are a 
windmill and other modern conveniences for 
saving labor. Mr. Padgett is unmarried, his 
sister, Mrs. Richer, acting as his housekeeper. 
In politics he is a Republican. He is a mem- 
ber of Cohansey Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd l-'ellows, of Bridgeton, and is a commu- 
nicant of the Deerfield Presbyterian Church, 
in which he is an Elder and Trustee. 



Ji 



AVID HARLAND PURGE, a pros- 
perous farmer of Landis township, 
Cumberland County, N.J., was born 
in Brookline, N.H., January 16, 1840, son of 
Luther and Almira (Reed) Purge. His 
grandfather, David Purge, was a native of 
Ireland. David Purge was married to Petsey 
Mclntyre in 1796, February 16, and by this 
union was the father of six children; namely, 



Ebenezer, Luther, Rebecca, Marian, John, 
and Gardner. Marian became the wife of Al- 
fred Vickery, and Rebecca the wife of a Dr. 
Metcalf. 

Luther Purge, son of David, born in Prook- 
line, July 25, 1801, after receiving his educa- 
tion in the district school, learned the cooper's 
trade. Working at this was his chief occupa- 
tion throughout his life. His wife, Almira 
Reed, of Hollis, N.H., gave birth to the fol- 
lowing children: Luther, John, Charles, Har- 
riet, David Harland, and Almira. Harriet 
became the wife of Luke Paldwin, of Prook- 
line; and Almira was twice married, her first 
husband being Joseph Clariborn. The mother 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

David Harland Purge, the fourth son, was 
educated in the public schools of his native 
town. When arrived at the age of seventeen 
he went to Townsend, Mass., where he learned 
the same trade that his father followed. He 
had been three years in Townsend when the 
Civil War began; and he enlisted in Company 
C, Fourth New Hampshire Volunteer Infan- 
try. One of the first services rendered by the 
regiment was to help in the expedition that 
captured Hilton Head Islands. Subsequently 
it went to Fernandina, Jacksonville, and St. 
Augustine, Fla., and Peaufort, S.C. At 
Beaufort in February, 1863, Mr. Purge re- 
enlisted in the same company and regiment, 
after which he went home on a furlough of 
thirty days. Returning to his duty by way of 
Washington, D.C., he was sent from there to 
the Army of the James. After reaching his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



383 



regiment, it went to Cold Harbor as a part of 
the Eigliteenth Corps. Thence it went with 
General Butler to Petersburg, to Morehead 
City, and eventually to Raleigh, N. C. , stay- 
ing in Raleigh until August 28, 1865. The 
regiment then returned to Brookline, N. H., 
where Mr. Burge was mustered out in Septem- 
ber. Shortly after he came to Vineland, and 
bought his present farm of twenty-five acres. 
The cultivation of this land, which he devotes 
to raising sweet potatoes and fruit and to gen- 
eral farming, has been his principal occupa- 
tion since. 

On August 28, 1 86 1, he was united in mat- 
rimony with Miss Caroline M. Weld. Mrs. 
Burge is descended from ancestors who have 
been American for more than two and a half 
centuries. Her father is Moses F. Weld, born 
in Berkshire, Vt., February 8, 1803, who has 
followed the trade of cabinet-maker through- 
out his life, and who is still hale and hearty, 
with every faculty clear, at the age of ninety- 
three. Mrs. Burge is the only child of his 
marriage with Pamela Hazeltine. 

Mr. Moses F. Weld is of the seventh gen- 
eration in direct descent from Captain Joseph 
Weld, who was born in England in 1595, 
came to this country in 1633 or 1635, and set- 
tled in Roxbury, Mass., where he was a 
wealthy merchant and a man who rendered 
important services to the colony. His eldest 
son, John Weld, born October 28, 1623, came 
to New England in 1638, married December 
25, 1647, and had three sons and six daugh- 
ters. His son, Joseph Weld, second, of Rox- 
bury, Mass., born September 13, 1650, mar- 



ried twice, and was the father of thirteen chil- 
dren. John Weld, second, son of Joseph, 
second, was born August 19, i68g, and died 
January 11, 1764. He married on December 
3, 1712, Mehitable Child, by whom he had ten 
children, a son named Moses being the third 
in order of birth. This Moses, the first of 
the name, was born March 26, 1722, and died 
May 10, 1806. By his second marriage with 
Deborah Faulkner, July 11, 1764, he became 
the father of five children, namely: Timothy, 
born August 4, 1765; Eben, born January 21, 
1768, who died April 21, 1835; Chester, born 
in Sturbridge, Mass., August 27, 1769, who 
died May 21, 1820; Deborah, born October 
16, 1777, who died December 20, 1795; and 
Peleg, born July 7, 1780. Chester Weld, a 
farmer by occupation, third son of Moses, 
first, married Penninnah Comings, December 
14, 1800, and was the father of four children 
who reached maturity, namely: Moses F., 
father of Mrs. Burge, born as already stated; 
Newton, born December 23, 1804, who died 
August 20, 1891 ; Chester, Jr., born April 21, 
1807, who died February 9, 1864; Susan C, 
born August 28, 1809, who married Adna 
Tenney. 

Mr. Burge and his wife have two children 
living — Kathryn and Louis H. Kathryn 
Burge, who is the wife of Professor W. H. 
Hervey, of Wilberforce University, Ohio, is 
herself professor of cooking, catering, and 
diet for the sick. Louis H. is a student of 
Bucknell University, in the class of 1898. 
Both parents are members of the Methodist 
ICpiscopal church. Mrs. Burge has taught in 



384 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the Sunday-school for many years, and Mr. 
Burge also for a long time has been both 
steward and Sunday-school teacher. The 
latter has affiliation with Lyon Post, No. lo, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and is a member 
of Farmers' Alliance, grange, Fruit Growers' 
Union, and also of the Sweet Potato Growers' 
Union. 



rm. 



JCOKGE AVIS HARRIS, M.D., a 
\^J_ well-known physician of Bridgeton, 
was born February 18, 1S44, in Daretown, 
Salem County, son of Aaron D. and Mary 
(Avis) Harris. John Harris, his grand- 
father, was born in England, whence he came 
to South Jersey in Colonial times. 

Aaron D. Harris was a native of Lower 
Alloway Creek, Salem County, born August 
5, 181 I. He was a miller by trade, and at 
one time owned the i)lace in Salem County 
formerly known as Fries Mill, near Friesburg, 
at the head of Cohansey Creek. Previous to 
that he purchased a farm near Aldine, Upper 
Alloway Creek, and for a numlier of years was 
profitably engaged in general farming. His 
marriage with Miss Mary Avis took place on 
February 20, 1 836, the ceremony being per- 
formed by the Rev. Edward Stout. She was 
born November 8, 181 1, daughter of George 
Avis. Her father, who came of Swedish an- 
cestors, was profitably engaged in farming. 
She bore her husband twelve children, four of 
whom are living, namely: William S., now 
at Aldine, N.J. ; Mary Elizabeth, the wife of 
David Williams; George Avis, the subject of 
this sketch; and David, a miller of Stoc 



Creek township. The father was a stanch Re- 
publican. He died on March 6, 1886, and 
the mother on January i, 1881. Both parents 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which the father was an officer. 

George Avis Harris, M.D., obtained his 
early education in the common schools of 
Friesburg. He subsequently took a course at 
Shiloh Academy, which at that time, under 
Oscar W. Whitford, was one of the leading 
institutions of learning in the southern part of 
New Jersey. In 1863 Mr. Harris enlisted in 
Company K, Twelfth New Jersey Regiment. 
He spent almost two years in active service, 
and at the battle of Chancellorsville received 
a gunshot wound in his left shoulder and 
chest. He was discharged for disability in 
May, 1S65. After the war Mr. Harris was 
engaged in teaching at different places in 
Cumberland, Salem, and Gloucester Counties. 
He then took up the study of medicine at 
Palatine, N.J., and graduated from the Penn- 
sylvania Eclectic Medical College in 1873. 
In addition to liis course of medical study. Dr. 
Harris has had tlie advantages of a hosiiital 
training, having been in attendance at Point 
Lookout Hospital, Maryland, and at the State 
Hospital in Newark, N.J. He makes a spe- 
cialty of tumors and cancerous diseases, and 
has had as many as half a dozen such cases on 
hand at one time. In his treatment of these 
maladies he has met with extraordinary sue-, 
cess having cured many difficult cases after 
other practitioners had pronounced them incur- 
able, without the aid of the knife and without 
causing pain to the patient. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



385 



On December 22, 1887, Dr. Harris was 
married to Miss Caroline W. Kampf, a daugh- 
ter of Frederick Kampf, of Bridgeton, this 
county, who is of German origin. They have 
one son, Ralph Avis. In his political views 
Dr. Harris is a Republican, but is not an 
aspirant to official honors. He and Mrs. 
Harris are communicants of the Methodist 
Protestant church. Their home is at 303 
North Laurel Street, where he also has his 
office. 



fHOMAS BRIGGS ROSS, Township 
Clerk of Landis, N.J., was born in 
Providence, R.I., August 28, 1837, son of 
Sanford and Lydia (Yeaw) Ross. He is a 
stanch veteran of the Grand Army, having 
had a notable career as a citizen soldier of the 
Republic; and it seems that he comes natu- 
rally by his military virtues, for his paternal 
grandfather served in the Revolutionary army, 
and his father was active in the Dorr War in 
Rhode Island. 

Sanford Ross was born in 181 5 in Provi- 
dence, R.I., and spent his boyhood days there. 
During his active manhood he for a number 
of years conducted a large comb manufactory 
in Leominster, Mass. His last days were 
spent in Vineland, N.J., with his son, 
Thomas Briggs, at whose home he died in 
1 891. At the time of the Dorr Rebellion he 
was Major of a regiment in the city of Provi- 
dence, and he was always afterward called 
Major Ross. His wife was a native of Scitu- 
ate, R. I., daughter of Welcome T. Yeaw, a 
large land-owner of that town. She died in 



Vineland in 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Sanford 
Ross were zealous and conscientious members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. They 
were the parents of eleven children, two of 
whom are living: Thomas Briggs, the subject 
of this sketch; and Edward A., of Leomin- 
ster, Mass. 

Thomas Briggs Ross received a good educa- 
tion, taking a course of study at the Leomin- 
ster High School. Shortly after leaving 
school he went to sea, shipping at New Bed- 
ford as a sailor on the old whale ship "Arab," 
under command of Captain Edward Grinnell. 
He was on this ship two years, cruising from 
the Arctic to the Southern Ocean, and, being 
taken ill with inflammatory rheumatism, was 
put ashore at Helo, a small island some three 
hundred miles south of Honolulu. When he 
recovered his health he shipped from Honolulu 
on a large clipper for a trip around the world, 
and visited Hong-Kong, China, and Bombay. 
Freights being very low, the ship remained in 
port si.\ months, waiting for a rise in prices, 
and then took a cargo for Germany, sailing 
around the Cape of Good Hope. It took one 
hundred and twenty-si.\ days to make the jour- 
ney, and they were in port two months in 
Germany. The ship was there loaded with 
a cargo for New York, and Mr. Ross eventu- 
ally reached home after an absence of four 
years. 

A few months after his return the Southern 
Rebellion broke out; and the sailor became a 
soldier, enlisting in Company A, Fifteenth 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. After 
drilling for a while at Worcester, the regi- 



386 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ment went South, stopping first at Arlington 
Heights and moving thence to Baltimore. 
They were soon incorjDorated in the Army of 
the Potomac, and took part in the disastrous 
eng